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Cover image for Pride and prejudice : an annotated edition
Format:
Title:
Pride and prejudice : an annotated edition
ISBN:
9780674049161
Publication Information:
Cambridge, Mass. : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2010.
Physical Description:
442 pages : illustrations (some color), color map ; 25 cm
General Note:
The text of this edition is essentially that of the first edition (1813).
Contents:
Pride and Prejudice: An Annotated Edition -- Volume One (Chapters 1-23) -- Volume Two (Chapters 1-19) -- Volume Three (Chapters 1-19) -- Further reading.
Summary:
The text of Jane Austen's classic tale is accompanied by an introduction to the author's life and work and explanatory notes discussing the novel's historical context, language, characters, and themes.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
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823.7 Austen 2010
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OVERSIZE Austen, J.
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823.7 AUSTEN
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Along with the plays of William Shakespeare and the works of Charles Dickens, Jane Austen 's novels are among the most beloved books of Western literature. Pride and Prejudice (1813) was in Austen's lifetime her most popular novel, and it was the author's personal favorite. Adapted many times to the screen and stage, and the inspiration for numerous imitations, it remains today her most widely read book. Now, in this beautifully illustrated and annotated edition, distinguished scholar Patricia Meyer Spacks instructs the reader in a larger appreciation of the novel's enduring pleasures and provides analysis of Darcy, Elizabeth Bennet, Lady Catherine, and all the characters who inhabit the world of Pride and Prejudice .

This edition will be treasured by specialists and first-time readers, and especially by devoted Austen fans who think of themselves as Friends of Jane. In her Introduction, Spacks considers Austen's life and career, the continuing appeal of Pride and Prejudice , and its power as a stimulus for fantasy (Maureen Dowd, writing in The New York Times , can hold forth at length on Obama as a Darcy-figure, knowing full well her readers will "understand that she wished to suggest glamour and sexiness"). Her Introduction also explores the value and art of literary annotation. In her running commentary on the novel, she provides notes on literary and historical contexts, allusions, and language likely to cause difficulty to modern readers. She offers interpretation and analysis, always with the wisdom, humor, and light touch of an experienced and sensitive teacher.


Author Notes

Jane Austen's life is striking for the contrast between the great works she wrote in secret and the outward appearance of being quite dull and ordinary. Austen was born in the small English town of Steventon in Hampshire, and educated at home by her clergyman father. She was deeply devoted to her family. For a short time, the Austens lived in the resort city of Bath, but when her father died, they returned to Steventon, where Austen lived until her death at the age of 41.

Austen was drawn to literature early, she began writing novels that satirized both the writers and the manners of the 1790's. Her sharp sense of humor and keen eye for the ridiculous in human behavior gave her works lasting appeal. She is at her best in such books as Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1816), in which she examines and often ridicules the behavior of small groups of middle-class characters. Austen relies heavily on conversations among her characters to reveal their personalities, and at times her novels read almost like plays. Several of them have, in fact, been made into films. She is considered to be one of the most beloved British authors.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up-Set in a time in which women were at the mercy of the arrangements made for them by their families, this story of the romantic courtship of Darcy and Elizabeth will resonate with readers. Though this adaptation conveys the language of the time and the story is true to form, the artwork lacks a certain appeal. There are some instances where characters are indiscernible and lack definition. However, the flow of the story is easy to follow, making it a good resource for students who find Austen difficult to decipher. Pairing this version with Nancy Butler's Pride & Prejudice (Marvel, 2009) would make a great lesson on comparing and contrasting revisions and adaptations. Students interested in Austen may read this title of their own accord, but others will need to be led to it.-Mariela Siegert, Westfield Middle School, Bloomingdale, IL (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Collagist Fabe adds flair to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice with 39 original illustrations that accompany the unabridged text. Fabe's collages overlay bright, watercolor-washed scenes with retro cut-paper figures and objects sampled from fashion magazines from the 1930s to the '50s. Accompanying each tableau is a quote from the Pride and Prejudice passage that inspired it. Like Austen's book, Fabe's work explores arcane customs of beauty and courtship, pageantry and social artifice: in one collage, a housewife holds a tray of drinks while a man sits happily with a sandwich in hand in the distance. While tinged with irony and more than a dash of social commentary, the collages nevertheless have a spirit of glee and evidence deep reverence for the novel. As Fabe describes in a preface, Austen "was a little bit mean-the way real people are mean-so there are both heroes and nincompoops. Family is both beloved and annoying. That is Austen's genius, her ability to describe people in all their frailty and humor." This is a sweet and visually appealing homage. (BookLife) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

Austen is the hot property of the entertainment world with new feature film versions of Persuasion and Sense and Sensibility on the silver screen and Pride and Prejudice hitting the TV airwaves on PBS. Such high visibility will inevitably draw renewed interest in the original source materials. These new Modern Library editions offer quality hardcovers at affordable prices. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.