Learn more about CCRLS
Reading recommendations from Novelist
Online learning resources
Cover image for The horse and his boy
Format:
Title:
The horse and his boy
ISBN:
9780060234881

9780060234898

9780064405010

9780329096731

9780064471060

9780812424300

9781424204540

9780064409407

9780060764876

9781442051294

9780590254779

9780064471091

9780439861366
Edition:
1st HarperCollins ed.
Publication Information:
New York : HarperCollins, 1994.
Physical Description:
224 pages : illustrations map ; 24 cm.
Number in series:
bk. 3.
Contents:
How Shasta set out on his travels -- Wayside adventure -- Gates of Tashbaan -- Shasta falls in with the Narnians -- Prince Corin -- Shasta among the tombs -- Aravis in Tashbaan -- In the house of the Tisroc -- Across the desert -- Hermit of the Southern March -- Unwelcome fellow traveler -- Shasta in Narnia -- Fight at Anvard -- How Bree became a wiser horse -- Rabadash the ridiculous.
Summary:
A boy and a talking horse share an adventurous and dangerous journey to Narnia to warn of invading barbarians.
Reading Level:
Middle School.

970 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader 5.8.

Reading Counts! 5.8.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 5.80 11 quiz: 5347.
Added Author:
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
Searching...
Lewis
Searching...
Searching...
Lewis
Searching...
Searching...
J FICTION LEWIS
Searching...
Searching...
J Lewis, C.
Searching...
Searching...
J Lewis, C.
Searching...
Searching...
JF LEWIS 3
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

A beautiful hardcover edition of The Horse and His Boy, book three in the classic fantasy series, The Chronicles of Narnia. The full color jacket features art by three time Caldecott-winning artist David Wiesner and interior black-and-white illustrations by the series' original illustrator, Pauline Baynes.

On a desperate journey, two runaways meet and join forces. Though they are only looking to escape their harsh and narrow lives, they soon find themselves at the center of a terrible battle. It is a battle that will decide their fate and the fate of Narnia itself.

The Horse and His Boy is the third book in C. S. Lewis's classic fantasy series, which has captivated readers of all ages with magical lands and unforgettable characters for over sixty years. This is a novel that stands on its own, but if you would like to journey back to Narnia, read Prince Caspian, the fourth book in The Chronicles of Narnia.


Author Notes

C. S. (Clive Staples) Lewis, "Jack" to his intimates, was born on November 29, 1898 in Belfast, Ireland. His mother died when he was 10 years old and his lawyer father allowed Lewis and his brother Warren extensive freedom. The pair were extremely close and they took full advantage of this freedom, learning on their own and frequently enjoying games of make-believe.

These early activities led to Lewis's lifelong attraction to fantasy and mythology, often reflected in his writing. He enjoyed writing about, and reading, literature of the past, publishing such works as the award-winning The Allegory of Love (1936), about the period of history known as the Middle Ages.

Although at one time Lewis considered himself an atheist, he soon became fascinated with religion. He is probably best known for his books for young adults, such as his Chronicles of Narnia series. This fantasy series, as well as such works as The Screwtape Letters (a collection of letters written by the devil), is typical of the author's interest in mixing religion and mythology, evident in both his fictional works and nonfiction articles.

Lewis served with the Somerset Light Infantry in World War I; for nearly 30 years he served as Fellow and tutor of Magdalen College at Oxford University. Later, he became Professor of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge University.

C.S. Lewis married late in life, in 1957, and his wife, writer Joy Davidman, died of cancer in 1960. He remained at Cambridge until his death on November 22, 1963.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-British narrator Alex Jennings does a smashing job with C. S. Lewis' delightful classic (HarperCollins Children's, 1994), the third story in the Narnia series. The tale begins with a poor slave boy named Shasta escaping from his adopted fisherman father who plans to sell him to a brutish stranger. A dignified talking war horse named Bree helps Shasta flee. Jennings plays Shasta with refreshing gentleness-listeners get a sense of the boy's sensitivity and fear as he embarks on the adventure of his life. The talented narrator plays Bree with the right amount of dignity and haughtiness. This horse amuses with his witty observations about human behavior, and sense of equine superiority. The horse and his boy hope to travel north to Narnia, and encounter numerous adventures and strange characters, all beautifully portrayed by Jennings. The most memorable supporting characters are another escaped child, a tough girl named Aravis, and her talking mare called Hwin. Jennings brings these two adventure seekers to life with his crystal clear narration. Thanks to his skills as a storyteller, the action moves rapidly from one exciting episode to the next. Evocative music plays at the beginning and end of each side of the tape. This presentation will enchant young listeners and encourage them to read the other titles in the series. It is helpful for students to have read The Magician's Nephew and The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe before enjoying this, but The Horse and the Boy stands alone as enthralling, self-contained entertainment.-Brian E. Wilson, Evanston Public Library, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal Review

This is an all-cast dramatization of the third book in Lewis's "Narnia" series. Those who have read all seven books will be better able to put this performance in context, but the uninitiated will enjoy this adventure tale in which, once again, intrepid children outwit nefarious grown-ups. Shasta is a young boy living in Calormene with a cruel man who claims to be his father. One night he overhears his "father" offering to sell him as a slave, so Shasta makes a break and sets out for the North. He meets Bree, a talking horse who becomes his companion. On their way they encounter Aravis, a high-born girl escaping an arranged marriage, and her talking horse. Despite their differences the children and horses learn to work together to reach the freedom they long for. In the meantime, they uncover a Calormene plot to conquer Narnia. The performances are energetic, and the characters easily distinguishable. This recording should not replace the book but rather should serve as an introduction to it. For family listening.ÄNann Blaine Hilyard, Lake Villa Dist. Lib., IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

1 How Shasta Set Out On His Travelsp. 3
2 A Wayside Adventurep. 19
3 At the Gates of Tashbaanp. 36
4 Shasta Falls In With the Narniansp. 51
5 Prince Corinp. 67
6 Shasta Among the Tombsp. 82
7 Aravis in Tashbaanp. 94
8 In the House of the Tisrocp. 109
9 Across the Desertp. 123
10 The Hermit of the Southern Marchp. 138
11 The Unwelcome Fellow Travelerp. 153
12 Shasta in Narniap. 167
13 The Fight at Anvardp. 182
14 How Bree Became a Wiser Horsep. 197
15 Rabadash the Ridiculousp. 211