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Cover image for Christmas in the barn
Format:
Title:
Christmas in the barn
ISBN:
9780690192711

9780690192728
Publication:
New York : Thomas Y. Crowell [1952]
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 19 x 21 cm
Summary:
Lyrical text relates the birth of a child in a barn among the animals, with illustrations which depict the barn and people of a twentieth-century farm.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
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E BROWN
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+ PRESCHOOL - BROWN
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On Order

Summary

Summary

What child is this Who is born here Where the oxen Stomp and peer . . . When Christmas in the Barn was first published in 1952, it demonstrated all of Margaret Wise Brown's mastery at skillfully fashioning a truly childlike interpretation of the Nativity story. For this larger, full-color edition, Caldecott Honor artist Diane Goode has created a new tableau of visitors to the barn that will delight generations of new readers.


Summary

What child is this Who is born here Where the oxen Stomp and peer . . . When Christmas in the Barn was first published in 1952, it demonstrated all of Margaret Wise Brown's mastery at skillfully fashioning a truly childlike interpretation of the Nativity story. For this larger, full-color edition, Caldecott Honor artist Diane Goode has created a new tableau of visitors to the barn that will delight generations of new readers.


Author Notes

Margaret Wise Brown was born on May 10, 1910 in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, New York, to Robert Brown, a Vice President at American Manufacturing Company and Maud Brown, a housewife. She attended school in Lausanne, Switzerland for three years, before attending Dana Hall in Wellesley, Massachusetts for two years. In 1928, she began taking classes at Hollis College in Virginia.

In 1935, Brown began working at the Bank Street Cooperative School for student teachers. Two years later, her writing career took off with the publication of "When the Wind Blows." Over the course of fourteen years, Brown wrote over one hundred picture books for children. Some of her best known titles include Goodnight Moon, Big Red Barn and Runaway Bunny.

Margaret Wise Brown died on November 13, 1952 of an embolism following an operation in Nice, France.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Margaret Wise Brown was born on May 10, 1910 in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, New York, to Robert Brown, a Vice President at American Manufacturing Company and Maud Brown, a housewife. She attended school in Lausanne, Switzerland for three years, before attending Dana Hall in Wellesley, Massachusetts for two years. In 1928, she began taking classes at Hollis College in Virginia.

In 1935, Brown began working at the Bank Street Cooperative School for student teachers. Two years later, her writing career took off with the publication of "When the Wind Blows." Over the course of fourteen years, Brown wrote over one hundred picture books for children. Some of her best known titles include Goodnight Moon, Big Red Barn and Runaway Bunny.

Margaret Wise Brown died on November 13, 1952 of an embolism following an operation in Nice, France.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 10

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Originally published in 1952, with expertly crafted woodcuts by Barbara Cooney, then reissued in 2004 in a larger, full-color edition featuring bunny-strewn ink and watercolor art by Diane Goode, Brown's tender, lyrical account of the Nativity has been reissued once again, this time with illustrations by the late Dewdney of "Llama, Llama" fame. Using oil paint, pastel, pencil, and marker, the artist discards the two previous wintry depictions, providing a truer sense of place with appropriately spare flora set in a vast desert. The earthy pigments of the scenery and the animals are offset by a richly bright blue sky and colorful garments worn by Mary and the wise men. The animals are rendered with childlike accuracy and just a hint of cartoonish whimsy. The humans are a bit more realistic and in varying skin tones, leaving the ethnicity of the holy family open to interpretation. Multiple tableaus offer myriad details but are never too busy. They expand the succinct text, giving a quiet sense of grandeur while at the same time making readers feel a part of the events. VERDICT A lovely book for a new generation of readers.-Linda Israelson, Los Angeles Public Library © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

A rough-hewn barn of stone and wood, nestled in a field dotted with sheep and palm trees, sets the scene for this newly illustrated version of Brown's cozy 1952 story of Jesus's birth. The late Dewdney's canvas-textured, mixed-media artwork is well-matched to Brown's spare, rhyming text, which incorporates phrases from hymns and the Bible ("Away in a manger, no crib for his bed"; "Because there was no room in the inn") as it introduces a cast of animal onlookers ("The little mice rustled in the sweet dry grass/ Near the lambs and the kine and the ox and the ass"). The rugged landscape and lantern-lit barn are depicted at sunset, night, and daybreak from a variety of perspectives, the warm palette and forceful brushstrokes conveying the story's hushed refrain: "And there they were all safe and warm/ All together in that ancient barn." Ages 4-8. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

First published in 1952, Brown's simple rhyming couplets tell the Nativity story as a baby is welcomed by a barn full of animals. Dewdney's new illustrations for this edition, created using oil paint, pastel, pencil, and marker, are more blurry than gauzy, with a muddy contrast between light and dark colors on many of the double-page spreads. (c) Copyright 2017. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Browns Nativity story, first published in 1952, is updated with new art from the illustrator of the popular Llama Llama series.The poetic, simple text follows Joseph and Mary as they are shown into the barn, where the animals wait. After the baby is born, the shepherds and wise men arrive, and an overhead perspective shows the whole cast of characters surrounding the newborn, all safe and warm. Dewdneys striking, mixed-media paintings have a loose, post-impressionistic flavor, with some areas showing her brush strokes or the texture of the canvas surface. She employs a variety of perspectives and sometimes shows characters as dark, incomplete silhouettes. The faces of the animal characters have the most personality, while the faces of the humans are less distinct and sometimes even blurry. Two of the wise men have dark skin; the other people have light skin. Browns short, rhyming text is accessible and satisfying, with clever inclusions of well-known phrases from traditional Christmas carols, and her characteristic mastery of rhyme, rhythm, and repetition is on full display. Not all of her word pairs are exact rhymes, but they work nonetheless. One page includes the rhyming word pair grass/ass, which may require some explanation, as well as the unfamiliar word kine, an archaic plural for cows. Despite these minor quibbles, a new edition of any of Browns work is a gift worth celebrating. (Picture book/religion. 2-6) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 2. In the 1952 edition of this Christmas picture book, illustrated by Barbara Cooney, color spreads alternate with black-and-white ones. Here Goode provides all new illustrations in full color. The text, in verse, relates a simple, rustic version of the nativity story, telling of an unnamed man and woman who find shelter among the farm animals in a barn, where their baby is born. Goode sets the action in snowy New England with a big red barn for shelter, and depicts the local shepherds as wise men. The warmth and grace of the understated verse are reflected in the moving ink drawings, glowing with gentle color washes. A pleasing new interpretation that brings the story closer to its young audience. --Carolyn Phelan Copyright 2004 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Originally published in 1952, with expertly crafted woodcuts by Barbara Cooney, then reissued in 2004 in a larger, full-color edition featuring bunny-strewn ink and watercolor art by Diane Goode, Brown's tender, lyrical account of the Nativity has been reissued once again, this time with illustrations by the late Dewdney of "Llama, Llama" fame. Using oil paint, pastel, pencil, and marker, the artist discards the two previous wintry depictions, providing a truer sense of place with appropriately spare flora set in a vast desert. The earthy pigments of the scenery and the animals are offset by a richly bright blue sky and colorful garments worn by Mary and the wise men. The animals are rendered with childlike accuracy and just a hint of cartoonish whimsy. The humans are a bit more realistic and in varying skin tones, leaving the ethnicity of the holy family open to interpretation. Multiple tableaus offer myriad details but are never too busy. They expand the succinct text, giving a quiet sense of grandeur while at the same time making readers feel a part of the events. VERDICT A lovely book for a new generation of readers.-Linda Israelson, Los Angeles Public Library © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

A rough-hewn barn of stone and wood, nestled in a field dotted with sheep and palm trees, sets the scene for this newly illustrated version of Brown's cozy 1952 story of Jesus's birth. The late Dewdney's canvas-textured, mixed-media artwork is well-matched to Brown's spare, rhyming text, which incorporates phrases from hymns and the Bible ("Away in a manger, no crib for his bed"; "Because there was no room in the inn") as it introduces a cast of animal onlookers ("The little mice rustled in the sweet dry grass/ Near the lambs and the kine and the ox and the ass"). The rugged landscape and lantern-lit barn are depicted at sunset, night, and daybreak from a variety of perspectives, the warm palette and forceful brushstrokes conveying the story's hushed refrain: "And there they were all safe and warm/ All together in that ancient barn." Ages 4-8. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

First published in 1952, Brown's simple rhyming couplets tell the Nativity story as a baby is welcomed by a barn full of animals. Dewdney's new illustrations for this edition, created using oil paint, pastel, pencil, and marker, are more blurry than gauzy, with a muddy contrast between light and dark colors on many of the double-page spreads. (c) Copyright 2017. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Browns Nativity story, first published in 1952, is updated with new art from the illustrator of the popular Llama Llama series.The poetic, simple text follows Joseph and Mary as they are shown into the barn, where the animals wait. After the baby is born, the shepherds and wise men arrive, and an overhead perspective shows the whole cast of characters surrounding the newborn, all safe and warm. Dewdneys striking, mixed-media paintings have a loose, post-impressionistic flavor, with some areas showing her brush strokes or the texture of the canvas surface. She employs a variety of perspectives and sometimes shows characters as dark, incomplete silhouettes. The faces of the animal characters have the most personality, while the faces of the humans are less distinct and sometimes even blurry. Two of the wise men have dark skin; the other people have light skin. Browns short, rhyming text is accessible and satisfying, with clever inclusions of well-known phrases from traditional Christmas carols, and her characteristic mastery of rhyme, rhythm, and repetition is on full display. Not all of her word pairs are exact rhymes, but they work nonetheless. One page includes the rhyming word pair grass/ass, which may require some explanation, as well as the unfamiliar word kine, an archaic plural for cows. Despite these minor quibbles, a new edition of any of Browns work is a gift worth celebrating. (Picture book/religion. 2-6) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 2. In the 1952 edition of this Christmas picture book, illustrated by Barbara Cooney, color spreads alternate with black-and-white ones. Here Goode provides all new illustrations in full color. The text, in verse, relates a simple, rustic version of the nativity story, telling of an unnamed man and woman who find shelter among the farm animals in a barn, where their baby is born. Goode sets the action in snowy New England with a big red barn for shelter, and depicts the local shepherds as wise men. The warmth and grace of the understated verse are reflected in the moving ink drawings, glowing with gentle color washes. A pleasing new interpretation that brings the story closer to its young audience. --Carolyn Phelan Copyright 2004 Booklist