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Cover image for Olivia- and the missing toy
Format:
Title:
Olivia- and the missing toy
ISBN:
9780689852916

9781416971375
Edition:
1st ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, ©2003.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Series title(s):
General Note:
"An Anne Schwartz Book."
Summary:
When her best toy mysteriously disappears, Olivia the feisty pig is determined to find out who is responsible.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader 2.0.

Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.0 0.5 71137.

Reading Counts RC K-2 1.9 1 Quiz: 34234 Guided reading level: J.

Reading Counts K-2 1.9 1.0 Quiz: 34234.

Developmental Reading Assessment 16 0.0 0.0.

Guided Reading Level J 0.0 0.0.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
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E FALCONER
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+ PRESCHOOL - FALCONER
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E FALCONER
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E/K OLI
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Falconer
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Falconer
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FALCONER
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E FALCONER
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FALCONER
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JP Olivia
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JP Olivia
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JP FALCONER
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E FALCONER
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JP Fal
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JP Fal
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Olivia has one toy that she loves more than anything. She feeds him, dresses him and takes him everywhere. So when he disappears, Olivia is FURIOUS!
She looks under the rug, under the sofa, under the cat. She shouts at Ian and baby William, she cries, she stomps...all to no avail. Then, one dark and stormy night, Olivia hears a noise...Clutching a candelabra, she creeps bravely into her bedroom, and sees a huge menacing shadow on the wall. Who is this monster, and what's that hanging from his jaws?
All is resolved peacefully in this entertaining story starring our favorite pig and her favorite toy.


Author Notes

Ian Falconer was born in Ridgefield, Connecticut on August 25, 1959. He studied art history at New York University and painting at Parsons School of Design and Otis Art Institute. He is a writer and artist who has illustrated many covers of The New Yorker magazine. He has also designed sets and costumes for the New York City Ballet, the San Francisco Opera, and the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden.

Olivia, his first children's picture book, received many awards including the Caldecott Honor in 2001. He has published several more picture books about Olivia including Olivia Saves the Circus, Olivia Forms a Band, Olivia Helps with Christmas, and Olivia Goes to Venice. He also illustrated Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk: A Modest Bestiary by author David Sedaris.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 5

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-Olivia is back, the indomitable individualist now coaxing her mother to make her a new soccer uniform in red, not the "really unattractive green" of the rest of the team. During the sewing session, Olivia's stuffed animal disappears and the fearless piglet must solve the mystery. She eventually tracks it down, but it is now in pieces, courtesy of the dog. Olivia's tears are surprisingly easily diverted by her father's glib promise from behind the newspaper to replace it with "the very best toy in the whole world," but the independent protagonist resews it herself and even improves on the original. Once again, the illustrations are stylish and witty, now extended by the addition of green to Falconer's trademark charcoal-and-gouache black, white, and red palette. The inclusion of photographic reproductions (the sphinx in a dream and Martha Graham on the bedroom wall) adds a nice contrast, and the endpapers show a comic strip of the little pig trying to get her toy to sit up. The changes in the size of the typeface to indicate volume of speech as Olivia interrogates her little brothers, and as her distress escalates, are hilarious. But the plot meanders a little, and it seems as though Falconer is letting style overtake story. Olivia is in danger of starting to appear more like a bratty bully than the charming nonconformist we know and love. Still, her many fans will enjoy this latest adventure of the piglet turned detective.-Jane Barrer, Washington Square Village Creative Steps, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

The porcine star who burst onto the children's books stage in black and white-plus her favorite color, red-is back! Here Falconer adds green to his palette and mystery to the plot for this third adventure featuring the incomparable Olivia. However, "green is not Olivia's color." So she entreats her mother to make a red soccer jersey to replace her team's green one. "But then you'll look different from everyone else on the team," says her mother. "That's the point," retorts the heroine in an oversize font. While her mother sews, Olivia's beloved green-and-red toy (who makes a comical cameo appearance in a wordless vignette on the endpapers) disappears with the turn of a page. (A clue appears in the lower right-hand corner of the illustration, where the toy is last seen.) It won't give away the fun to say that Perry-the spotted, panting pooch introduced in Olivia and who bears a certain resemblance to the sidekicks in the "Madame Olivia and her Trained Dogs" act in Olivia Saves the Circus-plays a bigger role in this episode. Once again Falconer nails common three-year-old parlance and posture. As Olivia shouts, "Where's my toy? It was right there on the bed. I just put it there. I remember exactly. That's my best toy. I need it!" the audience assumes the viewpoint of her mother, staring down into the protagonist's gaping mouth. Though it hardly seems possible, Falconer's visual and verbal narrative talents continue to grow. And so will Olivia's devotees. Ages 3-7. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Horn Book Review

(Preschool, Primary) In the third book starring the precocious, independent-minded piglet, Olivia loses her favorite stuffed toy and discovers, in a mock-horrific climax on ""a dark and stormy night,"" that the dog has chewed it to pieces. Jules Feiffer was funnier with the same theme (I Lost My Bear!, rev. 3/98), and Falconer pads the slender plot with some more of Olivia's characteristic mugging--as in an extraneous bit about Olivia's ugly green soccer uniform. As ever, the drawing is superb, and even if green isn't Olivia's favorite color, its accenting presence in the pictures here gives young viewers something to scout for amidst Olivia's signature red and black. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.


Kirkus Review

The line-master is back . . . in perfect form. When Olivia's beloved stuffed toy disappears, the hunt proceeds in typical fashion as she falsely accuses her brothers and searches her house on a "dark and stormy night." She discovers that her dog has chewed the toy to bits. Never one to hold a grudge, she repairs the toy and forgives the offending pooch, who at book's end lies cuddled beside her in bed. This contains elements Falconer's readers love: endpapers that add a cunning fillip (Olivia's relationship with her toy), velvety monochromatic palette with accents of red and (in this entry) green, incisive characterization rendered with minimal line (the subtlest change in mother's expressions), photographic homage to a feminist icon (Martha Graham), adroit gatefold (revealing canine criminal), happy ending, and above all the ironic contrast established between subtle nuance and Olivia's over-the-top personality. Containing more full-bleed illustrations and less white space, it may not seem as elegantly designed. Yet what it sacrifices in design it gains in a more fully developed plot. The heightened atmosphere and melodrama suit Olivia just perfectly. (Picture book. 3+) Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

PreS-Gr.1. Olivia (2001), the first book about the little piglet, was heavy on charm and light on story. The second, Olivia Saves the Circus (2002), went a bit overboard with its story of this every child's exaggerating. This book gets everything right; the story is simple yet compelling, and Falconer's art is as imaginative and inventive as ever. When the story begins, Olivia is mostly concerned with her soccer uniform. It's green, and she doesn't like it. Mother works on making a new one in Olivia's signature red, but by the time she's finished, Olivia's attention is focused elsewhere: her toy kitty is missing. Olivia looks everywhere, and she fiercely interrogates her brothers. It's only after the lights go out during a dark and stormy night that she finds the real culprit. A marvelous foldout reveals the monster that captured her best toy. As the most successful picture books do, this works on several levels: it's great for young listeners, who will respond to the action and the art, and for adults, who will smile with recognition at lively Olivia. --Ilene Cooper Copyright 2003 Booklist