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Cover image for My dog, Bob
Format:
Title:
My dog, Bob
ISBN:
9780823433865

9780823444700
Edition:
First edition.
Publication:
New York : Holiday House, [2015]
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Summary:
"Like all dogs, Bob likes breakfast, takes rides in the family car and digs for bones. He's just like any other dog--except for a few quirks"-- Provided by publisher.
Program Information:
Reading Counts K-2 1.5 1.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
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E TORREY
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+ PRESCHOOL - TORREY
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J PICTURE BOOK - TORREY
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Torrey
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TORREY
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TORREY
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JP Tor
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JP Tor
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Like all dogs, Bob likes breakfast, riding in the family car, and digging for bones. But unlike other dogs, Bob cooks breakfast for himself and his family, drives the family car and digs for dinosaur bones with a paleontologist. When the girl next door challenges Bob's owner to a contest to see whose dog is best, Bob doesn't sit, fetch or speak on command. Bob loses. "I'm sorry," Bob says as the girl and her dog march off in triumph. But to make up for his deficiencies, Bob makes pizza for the family.
Readers will enjoy the wry humor that is underscored by an ironic text and understated illustrations.


Author Notes

Richard Torrey has written and illustrated several books for young people, including Moe Is Best, an I Like to Read® book. He lives in New York State.


Reviews 5

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Bob is an amazing dog. He can cook breakfast, drive a car, play golf, and dig for dinosaur bones. When neighbor Mimi comes over singing the praises of her dog Truffles, Jeff has to agree that Bob can't hold a candle to Truffles when it comes to fetching a stick, sitting, and barking. So it goes that Mimi believes that her dog is the best, but in the end it is Jeff and his family who are enjoying a delicious pizza made by Bob. This humorous story is great for beginning readers. The bright cartoon illustrations follow the text perfectly and will catch the eye of any child. VERDICT A fun addition to any collection.-Betsy Davison, Cortland Free Library, NY © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

An unnamed boy introduces his floppy-eared dog, Bob, whose talents include cooking, playing golf, and driving a car-not to mention talking. When a neighbor, Mimi-who looks a little bit like Charles Schulz's Sally Brown, but acts like Lucy Van Pelt-claims that her queenly poodle is the better dog, Bob doesn't exactly rise to the occasion. "We win!" gloats Mimi, after her dog shows off tricks like fetching and sitting. Torrey leaves no question who the real winners are, wrapping up his story with Bob back in the kitchen preparing dinner for the whole family: "Pizza for all!" Subtle visual humor, especially regarding Bob's exceptional skills, makes this lighthearted story a winner. Ages 4-8. Agent: Ronnie Ann Herman, Herman Agency. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

Bob's young owner knows that his pet is special: "Like many dogs, Bob loves to ride in the car...especially when he's driving." But a young neighbor, unaware of Bob's exceptionalism, insists that her dog is superior because Bob can't do "dog" things like catch a stick. Like the text, the illustrations are clean and economical, leaving room for the humor to percolate. (c) Copyright 2016. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

A little boy narrates a story about his dog, Bob, who can do amazing things around the house but can't accomplish standard dog tricks. Bob is an unassuming sort, just a midsize, white dog with floppy ears and a big nose. His talents, however, are undeniable, as he can cook breakfast, drive the family to work and school, play golf, and help an archaeologist excavate a dinosaur bone. His family accepts all these stellar qualities as normal for Bob. But when the narrator meets a snobbish little girl in the park, her equally snobbish poodle shows off some standard dog tricks that Bob can't handle, such as fetching a stick and sitting on command. The snooty little girl declares her dog the winner of her self-styled contest and flounces off in search of someone else to impress. Bob apologizes for his shortcomings, the boy gives him a pat, and they head home to get something to eathomemade pizza made by the talented dog. Though the story is short and understated, its gentle, ironic humor and quiet acceptance of individual strengths sends a powerful message. Not everyone has the same abilities, and sometimes one who is less than successful on the playground may be a star at home in the family constellation. Cartoon-style illustrations in watercolor and oil pencil use simple shapes and uncluttered backgrounds to effectively complement the restrained feeling of the succinct text. Quiet and clever, just like Bob. (Picture book. 3-7) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

*Starred Review* In this amusing picture book, a little boy introduces his amiable pet. Like all dogs, Bob loves breakfast, the boy says, adding, Sometimes he makes it himself. An illustration shows the aproned dog standing at the kitchen counter, cracking an egg into a bowl and saying, Eggs for Jeff. Pancakes for Mom and Dad. Ham for me. Similarly, this dog enjoys riding in the family car, but he really prefers driving. His idea of fun with a ball is playing golf. Unlike other dogs, he won't fetch sticks or respond to commands such as sit or speak, but even when a neighbor gloats about her dog's apparent superiority, the boy reassures Bob that it's okay. The child narrator makes short statements in a matter-of-fact voice, while speech balloons carry conversations and other remarks. The words and pictures have different roles to play, and their juxtaposition creates the story's understated but very accessible humor. Simply drawn in oil pencil and brightened with watercolors, Torrey's expressive, cartoonlike illustrations contribute greatly to the book's tone, combining wit with affection. Whether Bob's feats are seen as real or imagined, this charmer of a picture book, reminiscent of Norman Bridwell's original Clifford the Big Red Dog (1973), is great fun for reading aloud.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2015 Booklist