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Cover image for Celebrate America : in poetry and art
Format:
Title:
Celebrate America : in poetry and art
ISBN:
9781562826642

9781562826659
Edition:
First edition.
Publication:
New York : Hyperion Books for Children, [1994]
Physical Description:
96 pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm
General Note:
"Published in association with the National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution."
Contents:
A place of eagles -- Remember the sky you were born under -- A great pulse beating -- Lift every voice -- Timeless is the wheel.
Summary:
A collection of American poetry that celebrates over 200 years of American life and history as illustrated by fine art from the collection of the National Museum of American Art.
Added Author:
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Library
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YA 811.008 CELEBRATE
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J 811.008 CELEBRATE
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811.008 CELEBRATE
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On Order

Summary

Summary

A collection of American poetry that celebrates over 200 years of American life and history as illustrated by fine art from the collection of the National Museum of American Art.


Summary

A collection of American poetry that celebrates over 200 years of American life and history as illustrated by fine art from the collection of the National Museum of American Art.


Reviews 8

School Library Journal Review

Gr 6 Up-This anthology of about 50 poems and reproductions of art works is a metaphor for the collective attributes that constitute this nation and demonstrates the constructive possibilities of pluralism. Short poems by both well-known poets like Langston Hughes, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Eve Merriam as well as many less-familiar writers are grouped in five sections with rather poetic headings: ``A Place of Eagles''; ``Remember the Sky You Were Born Under''; ``A Great Pulse Beating''; ``Lift Every Voice''; and ``Timeless Is the Wheel.'' They tell about the Japanese relocation of World War II; life on the Mexican border; a Mississippi African American. They also describe a baseball game, traffic in a city, a corn harvest, and assorted historical events. Each piece focuses on a quality of our lives in a positive, even celebratory fashion. The artwork is matched with the poems in ways that are mutually complementary rather than merely illustrative. Helen Lundeberg's painting of pioneer women adds solid substance to Margaret Walker's ``Lineage'' about her grandmothers. William Johnson's ``Jitterbugs 1'' gives visual vitality to Langston Hughes's ``Juke Box Love Song.'' Not that poetry needs any visual analog, nor do pictures demand verbal amplification. But this collection offers ideas about our nation and its varied peoples in a tandem, collaborative fashion that honors both forms of communication. Browsing through this cleanly designed book can be both aesthetically rewarding and also thought-provoking. It surely lives up to its title.-Kenneth Marantz, Art Education Department, Ohio State University, Columbus (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Diverse artwork from the Smithsonian's National Museum of American Art accompanies the work of such American poets as Emily Dickinson and Langston Hughes. Ages 10-up. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Horn Book Review

Paintings, sculpture, drawings, and photographs from the National Museum of American Art illustrate a compilation that captures the kaleidescope of two hundred years of American experiences. Poets include Langston Hughes, Gloria Anzald£a, Maya Angelou, and e. e. cummings; artists include Winslow Homer, Elizabeth Catlett, Jacob Lawrence, and Malcah Zeldis. A vibrant illustration of America's diversity, even as it serves to strengthen common bonds. From HORN BOOK 1994, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 4-7. Purists may dislike illustrated poetry books, but even those taking a firm stance might be swayed by this thoughtfully conceived volume with paintings, sculpture, drawings, and photographs from the National Museum of American Art at the Smithsonian. With diversity as her cornerstone, editor Panzer has divided the book into five sections: the country's landscape, its melting pot makeup, city and rural life, American history, and American pastimes. There's a terrific cross-section of writers and illustrators--Maya Angelou, Robert Frost, Winslow Homer, Thomas Hart Benton--and there is special pleasure in the pairings. Antler's poem "Raising My Hand" ("How often I knew the answer / And the teacher (knowing I knew) / Called on others I knew") gets an extra dimension when it is illustrated by Allan Roahn Crite's painting School's Out, in which schoolgirls, mostly African American, walk, skip, argue, and run past their traditional red brick school. How many girls, both white and of color, have had the feeling of their waving hands being invisible in the classroom? May Swenson's "Analysis of Baseball" ("Ball hates / to take bat's / bait. Ball flirts, bat's late") is fun to read on its own, but there's also lots to see in Morris Kantor's eye-catching painting Baseball at Night. Poetry weaves its web through images, but even with pictures nearby, those images, that crystalline use of language, remain. The art has its own role. Pictures can bring children to the poetry, give a face to it, or be a parallel focus. Combined, the art and words are exhilaratingly more than the sum of their parts. (Reviewed November 15, 1994)1562826646Ilene Cooper


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6 Up-This anthology of about 50 poems and reproductions of art works is a metaphor for the collective attributes that constitute this nation and demonstrates the constructive possibilities of pluralism. Short poems by both well-known poets like Langston Hughes, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Eve Merriam as well as many less-familiar writers are grouped in five sections with rather poetic headings: ``A Place of Eagles''; ``Remember the Sky You Were Born Under''; ``A Great Pulse Beating''; ``Lift Every Voice''; and ``Timeless Is the Wheel.'' They tell about the Japanese relocation of World War II; life on the Mexican border; a Mississippi African American. They also describe a baseball game, traffic in a city, a corn harvest, and assorted historical events. Each piece focuses on a quality of our lives in a positive, even celebratory fashion. The artwork is matched with the poems in ways that are mutually complementary rather than merely illustrative. Helen Lundeberg's painting of pioneer women adds solid substance to Margaret Walker's ``Lineage'' about her grandmothers. William Johnson's ``Jitterbugs 1'' gives visual vitality to Langston Hughes's ``Juke Box Love Song.'' Not that poetry needs any visual analog, nor do pictures demand verbal amplification. But this collection offers ideas about our nation and its varied peoples in a tandem, collaborative fashion that honors both forms of communication. Browsing through this cleanly designed book can be both aesthetically rewarding and also thought-provoking. It surely lives up to its title.-Kenneth Marantz, Art Education Department, Ohio State University, Columbus (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Diverse artwork from the Smithsonian's National Museum of American Art accompanies the work of such American poets as Emily Dickinson and Langston Hughes. Ages 10-up. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Horn Book Review

Paintings, sculpture, drawings, and photographs from the National Museum of American Art illustrate a compilation that captures the kaleidescope of two hundred years of American experiences. Poets include Langston Hughes, Gloria Anzald£a, Maya Angelou, and e. e. cummings; artists include Winslow Homer, Elizabeth Catlett, Jacob Lawrence, and Malcah Zeldis. A vibrant illustration of America's diversity, even as it serves to strengthen common bonds. From HORN BOOK 1994, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 4-7. Purists may dislike illustrated poetry books, but even those taking a firm stance might be swayed by this thoughtfully conceived volume with paintings, sculpture, drawings, and photographs from the National Museum of American Art at the Smithsonian. With diversity as her cornerstone, editor Panzer has divided the book into five sections: the country's landscape, its melting pot makeup, city and rural life, American history, and American pastimes. There's a terrific cross-section of writers and illustrators--Maya Angelou, Robert Frost, Winslow Homer, Thomas Hart Benton--and there is special pleasure in the pairings. Antler's poem "Raising My Hand" ("How often I knew the answer / And the teacher (knowing I knew) / Called on others I knew") gets an extra dimension when it is illustrated by Allan Roahn Crite's painting School's Out, in which schoolgirls, mostly African American, walk, skip, argue, and run past their traditional red brick school. How many girls, both white and of color, have had the feeling of their waving hands being invisible in the classroom? May Swenson's "Analysis of Baseball" ("Ball hates / to take bat's / bait. Ball flirts, bat's late") is fun to read on its own, but there's also lots to see in Morris Kantor's eye-catching painting Baseball at Night. Poetry weaves its web through images, but even with pictures nearby, those images, that crystalline use of language, remain. The art has its own role. Pictures can bring children to the poetry, give a face to it, or be a parallel focus. Combined, the art and words are exhilaratingly more than the sum of their parts. (Reviewed November 15, 1994)1562826646Ilene Cooper