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Cover image for The girl who played with fire
Format:
Title:
The girl who played with fire
Uniform Title:
Flickan som lekte med elden. English
ISBN:
9780739384176

9781415964361
Publication Information:
New York : Random House, ℗2009.
Physical Description:
15 audio discs (18.5 hr.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Number in series:
bk. 2.
General Note:
Unabridged.

Compact discs.
Summary:
Mikael Blomkvist, crusading journalist and publisher of the magazine Millennium, has decided to publish a story exposing an extensive sex trafficking operation between Eastern Europe and Sweden, implicating well-known and highly placed members of Swedish society, business, and government. But he has no idea just how explosive the story will be until, on the eve of publication, the two investigating reporters are murdered. And even more shocking for Blomkvist: the fingerprints found on the murder weapon belong to Lisbeth Salander--the troubled, wise-beyond-her-years genius hacker who came to his aid in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.
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CD FIC LARSSON
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CD - LARSSON
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FICTION - LARSSON
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Larsson, S.
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CD FIC LARSSON
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FICTION LARSSON
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CD FICTION Larsson
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CD LARSSON
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LARSSON Stieg
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CD Larsson, S.
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LARSSON
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Mikael Blomkvist, crusading journalist and publisher of the magazine Millennium, has decided to run a story that will expose an extensive sex trafficking operation between Eastern Europe and Sweden, implicating well-known and highly placed members of Swedish society, business, and government.

But he has no idea just how explosive the story will be until, on the eve of publication, the two investigating reporters are murdered. And even more shocking for Blomkvist: the fingerprints found on the murder weapon belong to Lisbeth Salander--the troubled, wise-beyond-her-years genius hacker who came to his aid in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, and who now becomes the focus and fierce heart of The Girl Who Played with Fire.

As Blomkvist, alone in his belief in Salander's innocence, plunges into an investigation of the slayings, Salander herself is drawn into a murderous hunt in which she is the prey, and which compels her to revisit her dark past in an effort to settle with it once and for all.


Author Notes

Prior to his sudden death of a heart attack in November 2004, Stieg Larsson finished three detective novels in his Millenium series.

Before his career as a writer, Stieg Larsson was mostly known for his struggle against racism and right-wing extremism. In the middle of the 1980s he helped start the anti-violence project "Stop the Racism". This was followed by the founding of the Expo foundation in 1995. In 1999 he was appointed the chief editor of Expo, a magazine published by the organization.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

Fans of intelligent page-turners will be more than satisfied by Larsson's second thriller, even though itÅfalls short of the high standard set by its predecessor, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, which introduced crusading journalist Mikael Blomkvist and punk hacker savant Lisbeth Salander. A few weeks before Dag Svensson, a freelance journalist, plans to publish a story that exposes important people involved in Sweden's sex trafficking business based on research conducted by his girlfriend, Mia Johansson, a criminologist and gender studies scholar, the couple are shot to death in their Stockholm apartment. Salander, who has a history of violent tendencies, becomes the prime suspect after the police find her fingerprints on the murder weapon. While Blomkvist strives to clear Salander of the crime, some far-fetched twists help ensure her survival. Powerful prose and intriguing lead characters will carry most readers along. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

*Starred Review* In our review of the late Larsson's first novel, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2008), we commented that the charismatic computer hacker Lisbeth Salander stole the show from her costar, journalist Mikail Blomkvist. In the second of Larsson's three novels, Salander and Blomkvist return, but this time the focus is mainly on Salander, and thank God for that! She is one of the most compelling characters to strut the crime-fiction stage in years, and it's a great shame that she will have such a short run. This time the plot begins, as did the previous book, with investigative journalism: Millennium, the magazine Blomkvist publishes, is about to do a story exposing the Swedish sex-trafficking trade when the authors of the story are both murdered, and Salander's fingerprints are found on the gun. Larsson jumps between Blomkvist's attempts to investigate the murder (and, he hopes, prove Salander's innocence) and Salander's own efforts to tie the killings to her past. It is that backstory that drives the novel: a ward of the state after being institutionalized as a teenager, following the day when All the Evil occurred, Salander has fought through a lifetime of abuse, familial and institutional, surviving through iron will and piercing intelligence. Whether those qualities will see her through yet again remains in doubt, even beyond the last page of this suspenseful, remarkably moving novel. Salander is one of those characters who come along only rarely in fiction: a complete original, larger than life yet firmly grounded in realistic detail, utterly independent yet at her core a wounded and frightened child. This is the best Scandinavian novel to be published in the U.S. since Smilla's Sense of Snow.--Ott, Bill Copyright 2009 Booklist


New York Review of Books Review

If you're among the legions who devoured "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo," you can turn immediately to Page 125 of THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE (Knopf, $25.95), Stieg Larsson's feverish sequel to his 2008 best seller. There you'll discover the fresh perils in store for Larsson's extraordinary heroine, Lisbeth Salander, a freakishly gifted savant whose horrific childhood has imprinted her with a lust for revenge. Not that the first 124 pages of this thriller aren't fun. In bringing us up to snuff on the global wanderings of his heroine - a computer hacker with a photographic memory and formidable mathematical skills who is on her way to solving Fermat's last theorem - Larsson tosses in everything from a hurricane in Grenada to a shopping spree in Sweden. But unless you take a voyeur's intense interest in which tattoo Salander had removed or how her breast implants turned out, it's more gratifying when the plot finally kicks in. This happens after Mia Johansson completes her doctoral dissertation on the sex trafficking of women from Russia and Eastern Europe - and Millennium, the crusading magazine published by Salander's former lover, Mikael Blomkvist, moves ahead with plans for a journalistic treatment of the subject, written by Mia's research partner, Dag Svensson. In his eagerness to get behind "the toughest exposé of trafficking that's ever been published in Sweden," Blomkvist promises that names will be named, not realizing that Salander's politically powerful enemies are among them. This draws her into the picture and, through a perverse twist, makes her the chief suspect when Mia and Dag are murdered. For all the complications of the melodramatic story, which advances at a brisk, violently cinematic clip in Reg Keeland's translation, it's clear where Larsson's strongest interests lie - in his heroine and the ill-concealed attitudes she brings out in men. "Salander," he explains, "was the woman who hated men who hate women." If the sadistic men in pursuit of this doll-like creature represent the suppressed fear and loathing of a dominant male culture under threat, then Salander surely stands for the female life force, the enraged and implacable avenger of victims of that culture. They never last very long, those anonymous joggers and dog-walkers whose only purpose in a crime story is to trip over the body in the woods. Unless, of course, they figure in a novel by Karin Fossum, who makes it her business - and the business of her uncommonly sensitive Norwegian detective, Inspector Konrad Sejer - to scrutinize in great depth and detail every person touched by a murder. In THE WATER'S EDGE (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $25), Kristine and Reinhardt Ris discover the abused corpse of 7-year-old Jonas August Lowe when they're out walking in the woods. Being a kind and gentle person, Kristine is appalled. But her bullying husband is so fascinated by the savage crime that he intrudes on the police investigation, revealing his own secret urges and destroying his marriage. And they aren't even the central characters. Fossum takes an insightful, mostly sympathetic view of everyone in the novel, including a disarming sex offender who does his best to help the police understand the mind of a pedophile-helpful advice when a second boy goes missing. And while this happens to be an exceptionally fine story, Fossum's real narrative appeal, readily apparent in Charlotte Barslund's translation, rests on her ability to see the humanity in even the most wretched soul. Who wants to catch a thief when he's as endearing as Martin Railsback, the oddball hero of Matthew Dicks's first novel, SOMETHING MISSING (Broadway, $14)? Martin is, after all, prone to rob people of items they'll never miss (a bar of soap, a few sticks of butter, the odd diamond) as a way of getting to know them. Despite his obsessive-compulsive work ethic, Martin manages to get himself in trouble over a toothbrush - but not before we've decided to let him in next time he calls. Robert Rivers, the rogue in Steven M. Thomas's CRIMINAL KARMA (Ballantine, $25), is also charming, but in a more conventional way. Although he has no compunctions about stealing pricey items - like the pink diamond necklace he's after here - Rivers has his moral code. ("I knew I was a bad guy, and tried to be as nice about it as I could.") So when the socialite who owns the necklace falls under the spell of a charismatic but possibly crooked guru, Rivers comes to the lady's aid. An energetic writer when describing the roughneck aspects of his hero's profession, Thomas also manages lyrical love notes to his Venice Beach setting. Margaret Maron can make anyone homesick for North Carolina - even if you come from Connecticut Deborah Knott, the quick-on-the-drawl judge who stands by her home state in this dependable series, takes a working vacation in SAND SHARKS (Grand Central, $24.99) to attend a conference in Wrightsville Beach for the state's 300 District Court judges. Between her personal contacts and her nose for professional gossip, Deborah has the assembled company sized up before dessert. But after the murder of a colleague so corrupt he's considered "a judicial disaster," she rethinks her assumptions. Even as she warily eyeballs her fellow judges, Deborah finds time to mull over the sorry fact that "minor sexual misconduct" is more likely to get you censured - or even killed - than "major judicial malfeasance." Stieg Larsson's heroine is a freakishly gifted savant whose horrific childhood has inspired a lust for revenge.


Library Journal Review

Lisbeth Salander, the antisocial but brilliant computer hacker who helped journalist Mikael Blomkvist uncover a serial killer on a remote Swedish island in Larsson's acclaimed The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, takes center stage in this second volume of his "Millenium" trilogy. Opening 18 months after the events of the first book, the novel finds our heroine lounging by the pool at a Caribbean hotel, reading a math textbook, and watching a woman who may be a victim of domestic abuse, while in Sweden, Blomkvist, bewildered by Salander's abrupt disappearance from his life, is set to publish a magazine exposé on the sex trade. Impatient readers may chafe at this seemingly irrelevant prolog, but like the mathematical puzzles Salander enjoys solving, there is a logic to the clues that Larsson carefully drops--integral to understanding his protagonist as we gradually learn her back story. The main plot takes off with the murders of Salander's legal guardian and the two writers of the article, and her fingerprints are found on the gun used in the killings. VERDICT Although the pace slows when the police investigation takes precedence and Salander briefly disappears from the action, we are well-rewarded in the exciting final section when she finally confronts her dark past. This is complex and compelling storytelling at its best, propelled by one of the most fascinating characters in recent crime fiction. Eager fans will placing library holds for the final volume, The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest, scheduled for a 2010 U. S. publication. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 4/1/09; see also the Q&A with Knopf editor in chief Sonny Mehta and executive director of publicity Paul Bogaards on p. 60.--Ed.]--Wilda Williams, Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.