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Cover image for None braver : U.S. Air Force pararescuemen in the War on Terrorism
Format:
Title:
None braver : U.S. Air Force pararescuemen in the War on Terrorism
ISBN:
9780451209832
Publication Information:
New York : New American Library, ©2003.
Physical Description:
xxi, 296 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Contents:
Prologue: The Worst Day of His Life -- "Hey, We Got Company" -- JDAMned -- Boyz 'N the HAS -- Murphy Never Rests -- "Holy Shit, Ditka Just Crashed" -- The Most Righteous Mission -- Free-falling to a Minefield -- Evil in the Valley -- Recon by Casualty -- KIA -- "We Weren't Getting Shot at That Bad" -- "I Regret to Inform You ..." -- Epilogue: Where Are They Now?
Summary:
An inside look at the Air Force's pararescue operations in Afghanistan chronicles the exploits of the 71st Rescue Squadron.
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Library
Call Number
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958.1046 HIRSH
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On Order

Summary

Summary

From award-winning journalist and combat veteran Michael Hirsh comes the thrilling inside story of the Air Force's pararescue operations in Afghanistan. The first journalist to be embedded with an Air Force combat unit in the war on terrorism, Hirsh flew from Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, with the 71st Rescue Squadron to their expeditionary headquarters at a secret location in Central Asia. Unparalleled access to the pararescue jumpers-or PJs-as well as to the courageous men and women who fly them where they have to go, often under enemy fire, allowed Michael Hirsh to uncover incredible stories of courage. Among them: the drama of a plane crash at 10,000 feet in the Hindu Kush mountains, where PJs climb with hundred-pound packs through chest-deep snow to rescue the crew...the tension of an unprecedented nighttime combat parachute jump into the middle of an Afghan minefield...the heartbreak during Operation Anaconda, when seven American fighting men die, including the first PJ killed in combat since Vietnam.


Author Notes

Michael Hirsh is a Vietnam combat veteran, a broadcast journalist, and a George Foster Peabody Award-winning documentary filmmaker


Reviews 3

Publisher's Weekly Review

A cross between Green Berets and 911 paramedics, Air Force pararescuemen-PJs for short-parachute or helicopter in, sometimes under fire, to treat and evacuate sick or wounded soldiers. Narrowly specialized, highly trained and bound by the credo "That Others May Live," PJs are the embodiment of the hyper-professionalism and leave-no-comrade-behind ethos of today's military. This gung-ho and often gripping account celebrates their exploits in the war in Afghanistan. Investigative reporter Hirsh loves to shoot the breeze with PJs while they regale him with anecdotes, brag about their maniacal training regimen and disparage other commando units, especially the Navy SEALs ("We don't think the world revolves around us," says one PJ. "Whereas the SEALs do"). Sometimes Hirsch lets his subjects go on too long, giving readers an all too vivid impression of a torpid day at the base. But when the action starts, he depicts their harrowing adventures with verve and insight, writing in a laconic, acronym-heavy military-ese that aptly conveys the cool-headed grit with which soldiers cope with the chaos of combat ("[Captain] Self began to sense that the shrapnel wound in his right thigh was going to cause mobility problems as the day wore on"). A Vietnam vet himself, Hirsh retains a certain scorn for the brass, especially when they evince a lack of faith in the PJ's ability to get the job done. Full of special-ops procedural, you-are-there detail, and moments of real pathos as soldiers confront the horrors of war, this book will delight military buffs. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.


Booklist Review

\rtf1\ansi\deff0\deflang1033\viewkind4\uc1d\f0\fs24 Medics in paratrooper gear, "PJs" are the air force's elite search-and-rescue personnel, ready in peacetime to save civilians (as recounted inack Brehm's That Others Might Live0 2000) titled after the PJ credo) and in war to save soldiers. Several missions in the latter category are covered in Hirsh's account, drawn from his interviews of pararescuemen mobilized for the war on the 9/11 terrorists in Afghanistan. Few details are left out in Hirsh's chronicle, which is dense with the minutiae of equipment, the specs of planes and helicopters, and at the crux of the matter, the medical status of the PJs' charges injured in the war zone. This detailed style might overwhelm casual readers of military affairs, but for those well acquainted with them, and with special operations in particular, Hirsh's approach captures the flavor of active duty life and the inner commitment to selflessness of the men it profiles: several PJs died on the exceedingly hazardous missions Hirsh reconstructs. In libraries where special-ops titles circulate, Hirsh's title merits consideration. 0 --Gilbert Taylor Copyright 2003 Booklist


Library Journal Review

In this 2004 work, newly available in audio, journalist and Vietnam combat veteran Hirsh (editor, Newsweek; Capital Offense) shares stories of triumph and heartbreak from pararescue jumpers, known as PJs, in Afghanistan. PJs undertake dangerous air-based rescue missions including going behind enemy lines to save fallen military brothers and sisters. Hirsch captures the essence of the PJs' creed-die so others may live-by detailing everything from procedural Special Ops information to the personal accounts of those involved in tragic circumstances. These gripping stories include helicopter crashes into the Hindu Kush mountains, nighttime parachute drops into mine fields to save allies, and somber descriptions of losing fellow soldiers. Seasoned narrator Corey Snow delivers a methodical approach to the content, and listeners will be easily fooled into assuming Hirsh narrated this work himself. VERDICT Best for nonfiction military fans. ["Sometimes Hirsch lets his subjects go on too long, giving readers an all too vivid impression of a torpid day at the base. But when the action starts, he depicts their harrowing adventures with verve and insight, writing in a laconic, acronym-heavy military-ese that aptly conveys the cool-headed grit with which soldiers cope with the chaos of combat," read the review of the NAL hc, LJ 10/1/03.]-Sean Kennedy, Cleveland Marshall Coll. Law Lib. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. xiii
Prologue: The Worst Day of His Lifep. 1
Chapter 1 "Hey, We Got Company"p. 5
Chapter 2 JDAMnedp. 34
Chapter 3 Boyz 'N the HASp. 52
Chapter 4 Murphy Never Restsp. 82
Chapter 5 "Holy Shit, Ditka Just Crashed"p. 107
Chapter 6 The Most Righteous Missionp. 125
Chapter 7 Free-falling to a Minefieldp. 156
Chapter 8 Evil in the Valleyp. 175
Chapter 9 Recon by Casualtyp. 198
Chapter 10 KIAp. 218
Chapter 11 "We Weren't Getting Shot at That Bad"p. 239
Chapter 12 "I Regret to Inform You..."p. 260
Epilogue: Where Are They Now?p. 275
In Memoriamp. 287
Indexp. 289