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Cover image for The fox in the library
Format:
Title:
The fox in the library
Uniform Title:
Pippilothek??? English
ISBN:
9780735841505
Publication:
New York : North-South, 2013.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 25 cm
General Note:
Translation of: Pippilothek??? Eine Bibliothek wirkt Wunder.

Originally published in German in 2011.
Summary:
When Fox chases Mouse into the library, Mouse offers Fox a book so that he will get new ideas -- like wanting to eat chickens instead of mice. But when the chicken-eating, fox-hunting farmer walks into the library, Fox and Chicken think fast and come up with a surprising solution that just might save them both.
Reading Level:
004-008.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
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E PAULI
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Fox didn't come to the library to read a book--he came to catch a mouse! But Mouse offers the fox a book, Fox gets all sorts of creative new ideas. Like eating chickens! Until Chicken points out that chicken bones are dangerous. But then all the animals must band together when the chicken eating, hating-Farmer walks into the library. AGES: 4 to 8 AUTHOR: Lorenz Pauli is a children's book author. His work has appeared on radio plays and in theater projects. He is married and has two children. Kathrin Scharer was born in Basel. She has illustrated more than a dozen picture books and non-fiction books for young children, for some of which she has also written the text. She was nominated for the German Youth Literature Prize in 2010. SELLING POINTS: * The adorable antics of Fox should be of interest to all booklovers...librarians, booksellers, and parents! * Books about books and libraries (such as Library Lion) have a built in appeal. Colour illustrations


Author Notes

Lorenz Pauli is a children's book author. His work has appeared on radio plays and in theater projects. In 2003 he received honorable mention for the Austraian State Prize for Poetry for Children.  He is married and has two children.   Kathrin Schärer was born in Basel. She has illustrated more than a dozen picture books and non-fiction books for young children, for some of which she has also written the text. She was nominated for the German Youth Literature Prize in 2010.


Reviews 4

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-A fox chases a clever mouse into a library. Fox has never been in one before, which allows Mouse to teach him a little bit about the mysterious building while distracting him from his previous intention. Fox is intrigued by the idea of reading and borrowing books, leaving immediately with a volume about a farmer and chickens. Mouse tries to show him that borrowing books is a privilege, but Fox does what he wants, and he leaves without getting a library card. He returns with a chicken in his mouth, wanting to research the dangers of chicken bones. After some more confusing escapades, including a scene in which Mouse begins to practice magic tricks, Fox and Chicken become friends and begin reading together. The tale suffers from choppy dialogue and a meandering plot. The loose, soft illustrations are dark and lackluster, and the pages with black text on red background are difficult to read.-Jasmine L. Precopio, Fox Chapel Area School District, Pittsburgh, PA (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Horn Book Review

The action begins when Mouse smells a fox and is chased into the library. From fiction to nonfiction to audiobooks, clever Mouse distracts Fox by educating it on library rules and resources. It's no surprise when Fox chooses knowledge and adventure over mealtime. Hastily rendered illustrations are expressive and provide some minimal humor but fail to rescue this slight, contrived German import. (c) Copyright 2014. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Picture-book stories that feature the library are bound to have an instant audience, but unfortunately, in this case, the tale doesn't stack up. A mouse is enjoying some peace and quiet until a fox chases her into the library. Scheherazade-like, Mouse distracts the fox from eating her by demonstrating all of the resources of the library. (Unfortunately for the local poultry, the first book she reads to him is about a fox chasing chickens.) Returning the next night, Fox asks Mouse to read a story to him since he can't read; Mouse is busy learning to be a magician, so she suggests he look for the book on a CD. He returns again with a chicken clenched in his jaws. She has told him that chicken bones are bad for him, and he has come to the library to confirm this; Mouse suggests an encyclopedia. When the nowlibrary-crazy Fox takes out a stack of books all at one time, Mouse cautions him that he can only take 10. From the appealing cover to the exaggerated ending, it's the delightful, colored-pencil illustrations that will attract readers. The storyline is well-intentioned, using the animal characters as an obvious contrivance to highlight the things libraries offer. However, both the device and the writing are belabored and do not serve the theme well. Moreover, the riff on the "fox in the henhouse" lays a narrative egg. Better picture-book invitations and initiations to the library are available, so skip this one. (Picture book. 5-8)]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

When Fox chases Mouse into the library to fill his belly, he doesn't expect to instead fill his noggin with new knowledge or to befriend a chicken! Among the stacks, a cast of clever animals use distraction tactics to avoid becoming Fox's dinner. They deliver library facts, share magic tricks, and spout knowledge: Chicken bones are bad for foxes. In the end, Fox may not have found his ideal snack, but he does discover a curiosity for books. The text feels purposeful at times, but the sly humor is reminiscent of Jon Klassen's I Want My Hat Back (2011), while the full-spread illustrations are filled with motion and will keep young listeners anticipating each page turn. An entertaining introduction to library etiquette for young children, this title will partner well with Tad Hills' How Rocket Learned to Read (2010), which also celebrates the excitement of learning.--Miller, Annie Copyright 2010 Booklist