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Cover image for Cinder
Format:
Title:
Cinder
ISBN:
9780312641894

9781250007209

9780141340135

9781451792638

9780606286336

9781410446077

9780605529564
Edition:
1st ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Feiwel and Friends, 2012.
Physical Description:
390 pages ; 22 cm.
Series title(s):
Number in series:
bk. 1.
Summary:
As plague ravages the overcrowded Earth, observed by a ruthless lunar people, Cinder, a gifted mechanic and cyborg, becomes involved with handsome Prince Kai and must uncover secrets about her past in order to protect the world in this futuristic take on the Cinderella story.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader Middle Grades Plus 5.8 14.0 Quiz: 148727.

Reading Counts 6-8 5.2 21.0 Quiz: 57470.

Accelerated Reader AR MG+ 5.8 14.0 148727.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
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T MEYER
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T MEYER
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YA FICTION - MEYER
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YA FICTION - MEYER
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YA FICTION - MEYER
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YA MEYER
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FICTION - MEYER
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TEEN MEYER, M. LUNAR BOOK 1
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SF MEY
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YA FIC MEYER 2012
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YA MEYER
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YA FICTION MEYER
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TEEN Meyer, M.
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TEEN Meyer, M.
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TEEN Meyer, M.
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TEEN Meyer, M.
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YA MEYER
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TEEN FICTION Meyer, M.
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YA MEYER
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Meyer
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Meyer
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On Order

Summary

Summary

The #1 New York Times Bestselling Series!

Humans and androids crowd the raucous streets of New Beijing. A deadly plague ravages the population. From space, a ruthless lunar people watch, waiting to make their move. No one knows that Earth's fate hinges on one girl. . . .

Cinder, a gifted mechanic, is a cyborg. She's a second-class citizen with a mysterious past, reviled by her stepmother and blamed for her stepsister's illness. But when her life becomes intertwined with the handsome Prince Kai's, she suddenly finds herself at the center of an intergalactic struggle, and a forbidden attraction. Caught between duty and freedom, loyalty and betrayal, she must uncover secrets about her past in order to protect her world's future.

Marissa Meyer on Cinder , writing, and leading men
Which of your characters is most like you?
I wish I could say that I'm clever and mechanically-minded like Cinder, but no--I can't fix anything. I'm much more like Cress, who makes a brief cameo in Cinder and then takes a more starring role in the third book. She's a romantic and a daydreamer and maybe a little on the naïve side--things that could be said about me too--although she does find courage when it's needed most. I think we'd all like to believe we'd have that same inner strength if we ever needed it.
Where do you write?
I have a home office that I've decorated with vintage fairy tale treasures that I've collected (my favorite is a Cinderella cookie jar from the forties) and NaNoWriMo posters, but sometimes writing there starts to feel too much like work. On those days I'll write in bed or take my laptop out for coffee or lunch.
If you were stranded on a desert island, which character from Cinder would you want with you?
Cinder, definitely! She has an internet connection in her brain, complete with the ability to send and receive comms (which are similar to e-mails). We'd just have enough time to enjoy some fresh coconut before we were rescued.
The next book in the Lunar Chronicles is called Scarlet , and is about Little Red Riding Hood. What is appealing to you most about this character as you work on the book?
Scarlet is awesome--she's very independent, a bit temperamental, and has an outspokenness that tends to get her in trouble sometimes. She was raised by her grandmother, an ex-military pilot who now owns a small farm in southern France, who not only taught Scarlet how to fly a spaceship and shoot a gun, but also to have a healthy respect and appreciation for nature. I guess that's a lot of things that appeal to me about her, but she's been a really fun character to write! (The two leading men in Scarlet, Wolf and Captain Thorne, aren't half bad either.)


Author Notes

Marissa Meyer received a bachelor's degree in creative writing and children's literature from Pacific Lutheran University and a master's degree in publishing from Pace University. After graduation, she worked as an editor in Seattle before becoming a freelance typesetter and proofreader. Under the penname Alicia Blade, she wrote over forty Sailor Moon fanfics and a novelette entitled The Phantom of Linkshire Manor, which was published in the gothic romance anthology Bound in Skin.

Meyer is the author of The Lunar Chronicles. In 2015 she made The New York Times Best Seller List with her titles Cress and Fairest which are books 3 and 3.5 of the Lunar Chronilces. Marissa's novel, Heartless, made The New York Times Best Seller List in 2016.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 5

School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-The Earth of the future is beset by a plague and under threat of invasion by the Lunar people, residents of the moon. Teenage cyborg, Linh Cinder, is despised by her stepmother and forced to work as a mechanic to provide an income for her guardian and stepsisters. Cinder is the best mechanic in New Beijing and her skills are sought by Prince Kai to fix his personal android and recover the important data the machine possesses. Her life is irrevocably altered when her younger stepsister contracts the deadly letumosis and Cinder is sent by her stepmother as a "volunteer" for plague research, a fate no other cyborg has survived. Yet survive she does, and the implications of her unique physiology will have far-reaching consequences for the commonwealth and, possibly, the planet. Marissa Meyer's debut novel (Feiwel & Friends, 2012), the first in a planned quartet, presents a retelling of Cinderella with all the recognizable elements woven into this original, futuristic story. Narrator Rebecca Soler captures the determination and independence that make Cinder a compelling character despite the predictability of her true identity. Though not without flaws, the story will keep listeners engaged and awaiting the subsequent titles-Amanda Raklovits, Champaign Public Library, IL (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

First in the Lunar Chronicles series, this futuristic twist on Cinderella retains just enough of the original that readers will enjoy spotting the subtle similarities. But debut author Meyer's brilliance is in sending the story into an entirely new, utterly thrilling dimension. Cinder is a talented teenage mechanic and cyborg-part human, part robot-who has been living in New Beijing with a demanding adoptive mother and two stepsisters, ever since her late stepfather took Cinder in after a hovercraft accident. Several events abruptly turn Cinder's world upside down: a chance meeting with the handsome Prince Kai has her heart racing; a plague pandemic threatens her beloved sister Peony; Cinder learns she is immune to the plague; and the evil Lunar Queen Levana arrives on Earth, scheming to marry Kai. Though foreshadowing early on makes it fairly clear where the story is headed, it unfolds with the magic of a fairy tale and the breakneck excitement of dystopian fiction. Meyer's far-future Earth is richly imagined, full of prejudice and intrigue, characters easy to get invested in, and hints of what might await in future books. Ages 12-up. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

Sci-fi meets fairy tale in this futuristic Cinderella story blending androids, hovercrafts, and netscreens with royalty, a ball, and an evil stepmother. With no memory of her life before becoming a cyborg, teenage Linh Cinder lives with her guardian stepmother and two stepsisters after her adoptive stepfather's death. She's treated as subhuman and forced to earn the family's living as a mechanic, but her life changes after an encounter with New Beijing's Prince Kai. Kai and Cinder are drawn to each other, even as she hides her cyborg identity and feelings from him, believing they can never be together. Soon Cinder is involved in finding a cure for a plague that's decimating Earth's population and also helping in Kai's search for the missing heir to the Lunar throne, who (unlike the current, brutal Lunar queen) he hopes will be sympathetic to Earth's plight. Debut author Meyer ingeniously incorporates key elements of the fairy tale into this first series entry. Early foreshadowing makes the cliffhanger ending involving Cinder's true identity rather predictable, but the novel is full of enough twists and turns, complex characters, and detailed world-building to redeem itself. While nearly the entire Cinderella story plays itself out here, Cinder's unfinished journey, together with Meyer's vivid sci-fi world, will leave readers anticipating the next installment. cynthia k. ritter From HORN BOOK, Copyright The Horn Book, used with permission.


Kirkus Review

(Science fiction/fairy tale. 12-15)]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

There's a lot of moving parts in this fresh spin on Cinderella, the first in a four-book series. First, we've moved from a fairy-tale kingdom to a post-World War IV future in New Beijing. Plagued by her stepmother and shunned by society for being a cyborg, Cinder keeps her head down as the city's best mechanic until she catches the eye of the dashing Prince Kai. He's got matters of state to worry about, though, including an incurable plague and the ever-present threat of war from the moon-people, known as Lunars. The over-the-top, spiteful cruelty that dogs the heroine from all sides is a little too cartoonish to take seriously when retrofitted from fairy tale to science fiction, and it's best not to ponder things like why such a technologically advanced civilization would get into such a tizzy about a fancy-dress ball. Still, readers will enjoy lining up the touchstones from the old favorite, and Meyer brings a good deal of charm and cleverness to this entertaining, swiftly paced read.--Chipman, Ian Copyright 2010 Booklist