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Cover image for I am invited to a party!
Format:
Title:
I am invited to a party!
Author:
ISBN:
9781423106876

9781428764880

9781448743537

9781406314694

9780605165410
Edition:
First edition.
Publication:
New York : Hyperion Books for Children, 2007.
Physical Description:
56 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm
Series title(s):
Summary:
Attending her first party, Piggie follows "party expert" Gerald the elephant's advice on what to wear, with surprising results.
Reading Level:
Ages 4-8.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader Grades K-4 0.7 0.5 Quiz 154567 English fiction, audio quiz available for beginning readers.

Accelerated Reader AR LG 0.7 0.5 154567.
Holds:

Available:*

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JER WILLEMS
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J LEVEL 1 - WILLEMS
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1-2 WILLEMS
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Gerald is careful. Piggie is not.
Piggie cannot help smiling. Gerald can.
Gerald worries so that Piggie does not have to.

Gerald and Piggie are best friends.

In I Am Invited to a Party! Piggie is invited to her first party. She doesn't know what to wear, though, so she asks her best friend Elephant for help. Elephant's advice is odd to say the least, so Piggie will try on all sorts of zany outfits before finally arriving at the party for a hilarious surprise.


Author Notes

Mo Willems was born on February 11, 1968. After graduating from New York University's Tisch School for the Arts, he spent a year traveling around the world drawing a cartoon every day, which were published in the book You Can Never Find a Rickshaw When it Monsoons. For nine seasons, he worked as a writer and animator for PBS' Sesame Street, where he received 6 Emmy Awards for his writing. During this time, he also served as a weekly commentator for BBC Radio and created two animated series, Nickelodeon's The Off-Beats and Cartoon Network's Sheep in the Big City.

While working as head writer for Cartoon Network's Codename: Kids Next Door, he began writing and drawing books for children. He received three Caldecott Honor Awards for Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! in 2004; Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale in 2005; and Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity in 2008. He also created the Elephant and Piggie series for Easy Readers, which were awarded the Theodor Seuss Geisel Medal in 2008 and 2009.

His drawings, wire sculptures, and ceramics have been exhibited in numerous galleries and museums across the nation. Occasionally he serves as the Radio Cartoonist for NPR's All Things Considered. He voices and produces animated cartoons based on his books with Weston Woods studios. The animated Knuffle Bunny was awarded Best Film during the New York International Children's Film Festival in 2008 and received the Andrew Carnegie Medal in 2007. His title Happy Pig Day made Publisher's Weekly Best Seller List for 2011. In 2012 his title Goldilocks and The Three Dinosaurs made The New York Times Best Seller List. In 2013 his titles: That is Not a Good Idea!, Let's Go for a Drive! and I'm a Frog! made the New York Times Best Seller List. In 2014 The Pigeons Need a Bath! and Waiting Is Not Easy! made the New York Times Best Seller List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-Beginning readers familiar with Willems's books will recognize his distinctive humor and illustrative style in these stories. When Piggie receives her first invitation to a party, she asks Gerald to join her and relies on his advice-because he "knows" parties-in order to prepare for the big event. The elephant, however, has a tendency to overanalyze, so he prepares them both for any contingency-a fancy/pool/costume party. Piggie's expressive features show her questions about their attire, but the friends set off bedecked in flippers, masks, top hat, pearl earrings, cowboy hat, and evening dress. Imagine her surprise when they find all the other guests as lavishly overdressed as they are. In the second title, Gerald learns that there are worse things than a bird on your head, namely, two love birds, a nest, and three hatchlings. With the help of Piggie, he is finally able to ask them to move, but, as the final page reveals, they have become her problem. Both books use speech bubbles-gray ones for Gerald, pink for Piggie-to tell the entire story. This feature is a nice touch that facilitates paired/choral readings. The conversation between the friends flows smoothly and allows beginning readers to practice expression as they read. These appealing titles will tickle the funny bones of children and are sure to become favorites.-Maura Bresnahan, High Plain Elementary School, Andover, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Horn Book Review

Mo Willems There Is a Bird on Your Head!; illus. by the author (Preschool, Primary)It helps to have a best friend when you run into trouble, whether it's the what-to-wear-to-a-party kind or the wildlife-on-your-head variety. Like the first two entries in this beginning reader series (My Friend Is Sad and Today I Will Fly!, rev. 5/07), each of these books features a simple story told entirely through speech balloons and Willems's emotive pig and elephant characters. The animated illustrations will help new readers decode tone and meaning while the spare dialogue enhances the pictures' slapstick humor. High-spirited Piggie has never been to a party; when she receives her first invitation, neurotic Gerald takes charge of their attire. "I know parties," he claims, but Piggie and young readers may have doubts about that when Gerald insists they dress for "a fancy pool costume party." In the end, Gerald proves to be savvier than he and Piggie look. In the second book, two "love birds" make a nest on Gerald's head. Cause enough for panic, but when their three eggs hatch (in record gestation time), hysteria ensues. Luckily, Piggie has a good head on her shoulders. The minimalism of both the text and the uncluttered pictures focuses readers' attention and moves the stories forward. Party on, Elephant & Piggie! From HORN BOOK, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Elephant and Piggie return in two more adventures that will deliver guffaws to even the most beginning reader. As in Today I Will Fly and My Friend Is Sad (March 2007), the text appears exclusively in speech balloons, the dialogue perfectly complemented and enhanced by clear cartoon illustrations that show a master of body language and pacing at the top of his game. In I Am Invited to a Party! Piggie, a novice at parties, asks Gerald the Elephant for advice: "I know parties," he says sagely. The two celebrate the invitation and prepare in ever more absurd fashion--it may be a "fancy pool costume party," after all, and "WE MUST BE READY!" The end defies all prediction in a goodhearted, highly satisfying twist that will have readers giggling with delight. In There Is a Bird on Your Head! (ISBN: 978-1-4231-0686-9), Piggie provides narration to an ever-more-frantic Gerald as two birds alight, nest and hatch their brood on his head. Both are perfectly pitched to their audience, who are too often given the dreariest of stuff to cut their reading teeth on. This silliness is sublime. (Early reader. 4-8) Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


New York Review of Books Review

UNLESS you've been living in a cave (and maybe even then), you've probably heard that "On the Road" turned 50 last month. But Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassady weren't the only literary outlaws of 1957, or even the most influential: in March of that year, children got their first look at "The Cat in the Hat," and the world of Dick and Jane has never been the same. The spirit of today's most popular picture books - sassy, silly, playful, irreverent - shows that, half a century later, we're still living in the house that Seuss built. Mo Willems is supremely comfortable there. Willems, for all you cave-dwellers, is the author-illustrator of "Knuffle Bunny" and the Pigeon series - "Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!" is still a favorite with my 4-year-old son - and in those books he displayed an uncanny knack for speaking to children and their parents at the same time. In "Knuffle Bunny," a preverbal toddler tries to make her father understand that she's lost a beloved toy, while in the Pigeon books kids get a chance to lay down the law for once, as a manic bird begs and wheedles for favors that would make the Cat in the Hat proud. The stories unfold mostly in dialogue, accompanied by the kind of doodle-like sketches you might see if Saul Steinberg had ever illustrated a borscht belt comedy routine. Now Willems has created an early-reader series, starring an elephant named Gerald and a pig named Piggie. The first two books in the series appeared this spring, but Willems works quickly, and here come the next two already: simple stories that develop the pairs' inexplicable friendship and confirm their essential natures. "Gerald is careful," the back covers tell us. "Piggie is not. Piggie cannot help smiling. Gerald can. Gerald worries so that Piggie does not have to." Be that as it may, it turns out that the careful, frowning, worrying elephant is the one who knows a little something about partying. That's the gag, anyway, in "I Am Invited to a Party!" When Piggie receives an invitation in the mail, she worries she won't know the right way to behave. "Will you go with me?" she asks Gerald. "I have never been to a party." The elephant reassures her: "I will go with you. I fenow parties." Over the course of the book, as the friends prepare for an ever more elaborate (and ever more unlikely) bash, Piggie's skepticism mounts. "A fancy pool costume party?" she asks, crossing her gloved arms and squinting through swim goggles. Gerald replies with a bellow: "We must be ready!!!" It's a cute concept, and an impressively economical one, managing in the space of a joke to tap into children's social anxieties, dress-up fetishes and love of parties - all with a simple, repeated vocabulary of about 50 words that makes it effective for beginning readers. But it's still just a joke. I have a similar complaint about the other new Elephant & Piggie book, which also relies on a visual punch line and is pretty much summed up by its title: "There Is a Bird on Your Head!" These are cheerful, charming little stories, and Willems is a genuinely funny guy, but in the early going this series lacks the depth of its peer group - the fablelike whimsy of Arnold Lobel's "Frog and Toad" books, the wry complexity of Russell Hoban's "Frances" stories. One of the lessons of the Cat in the Hat's total world domination was that character counts, and in his earlier books Willems proved he had absorbed that lesson. But it says something about the Elephant & Piggie books, I think, that what my son most looks forward to in them is trying to find the Pigeon hidden in the endpapers. Gregory Cowles is an editor at the Book Review.