Learn more about CCRLS
Reading recommendations from Novelist
Online learning resources
Cover image for Library lion
Format:
Title:
Library lion
ISBN:
9780763622626

9781430102878
Edition:
1st ed.
Publication:
Cambridge, Mass. : Candlewick Press, ©2006.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 30 cm
Summary:
A lion starts visiting the local library but runs into trouble as he tries to both obey the rules and help his librarian friend.
Program Information:
AR 2.8 .5.

Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.8 0.5 108319.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.3 2 Quiz: 39325 Guided reading level: K.

Accelerated Reader Grades K-4 2.8 0.5 Quiz 108319 English fiction, vocabulary quiz available, audio quiz available for beginning readers.
Added Author:
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
Searching...
E KNUDSEN
Searching...
Searching...
+ PRESCHOOL - KNUDSEN
Searching...
Searching...
J PICTURE BOOK - KNUDSEN
Searching...
Searching...
J PICTURE BOOK - KNUDSEN
Searching...
Searching...
E/K KNU
Searching...
Searching...
KNUDSEN
Searching...
Searching...
KNUDSEN
Searching...
Searching...
KNUDSEN
Searching...
Searching...
KNUDSEN
Searching...
Searching...
J Pink (Knudsen)
Searching...
Searching...
JP Knu
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

An affectionate storybook tribute to that truly wonderful place: the library.

Miss Merriweather, the head librarian, is very particular about rules in the library. No running allowed. And you must be quiet. But when a lion comes to the library one day, no one is sure what to do. There aren't any rules about lions in the library. And, as it turns out, this lion seems very well suited to library visiting. His big feet are quiet on the library floor. He makes a comfy backrest for the children at story hour. And he never roars in the library, at least not anymore. But when something terrible happens, the lion quickly comes to the rescue in the only way he knows how. Michelle Knudsen's disarming story, illustrated by the matchless Kevin Hawkes in an expressive timeless style, will win over even the most ardent of rule keepers.


Author Notes

Michelle Knudsen has worked in libraries in New York City and Ithaca, New York. She is the author of more than forty books, among them Marilyn's Monster, illustrated by Matt Phelan; Big Mean Mike, illustrated by Scott Magoon; and Argus, illustrated by Andréa Wesson. Michelle Knudsen lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Kevin Hawkes is the illustrator of more than forty books for children, including The Three Mouths of Little Tom Drum by Nancy Willard; Weslandia and Sidewalk Circus by Paul Fleischman; and Handel, Who Knew What He Liked and Me, All Alone, at the End of the World by M. T. Anderson. Kevin Hawkes lives in southern Maine.


Reviews 4

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-In Michelle Knudsen's delightful picture book (Candlewick, 2006), Lion walks into the library one day and decides to stay for storytime. The librarian says that he may remain there and help maintain the library provided he obeys the rules and doesn't roar. When the librarian falls from a stool and is injured, the only way Lion can get help for her is to roar. Realizing that he has broken the rules, he leaves the library. Happily, he's fetched back and once again becomes a favored feature of the little library. Christine Marshall provides a beautifully modulated reading of this charming book, giving each character a distinct voice. Less successful are the sound effects that are very faint even when the volume is turned up high. Track one features page-turn signals. Be sure to have the book available so listeners can peruse Kevin Hawkes's wonderful acrylic-and-pencil illustrations that are integral to the telling. A fine choice for storytimes.-B. Allison Gray, Palmdale City Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

The library's no place for a real live lion. But what if it was a book-loving beast that followed all the library rules, enforced by head librarian Miss Merriweather? Well, that's a different story the fun, fantastical tale in Knudsen's entertaining picture book. Library patrons and staff are perplexed and a bit frightened when a lion arrives in the local library, checking out the collection, napping in the children's corner and making himself at home for story hour. But Miss Merriweather doesn't see any reason to expel this mane attraction if he abides by her rules (e.g., "No running!"; "If you cannot be quiet, you will have to leave [the library]"). Soon the furry fellow befriends nearly everyone in the place, and even becomes Miss Merriweather's helpful assistant. One day, Miss Merriweather is in trouble. Lassie-like, the lion gets her some help, and then banishes himself from the place for breaking the rules (he unquietly roars in order to get the attention of one of the librarian's colleagues). Happily, this heroic literary lion doesn't stay away for long. Knudsen's gentle tale of a revered yet welcoming community destination will ring true for many readers. Hawkes's (Weslandia) evocative, soft-hued acrylic-and-pencil illustrations have a timeless feel, depicting a cozy book-filled haven that any story fan would love to visit, rules and all. Ages 4-7. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Kirkus Review

Knudsen and Hawkes pick a perfect setting to express the idea that breaking rules can sometimes be a good thing. When a lion wanders into a small town public library the Head Librarian, Miss Merriweather, brushes off the protestations of her realistically officious colleague Mr. McBee and allows it to stay--so long as it keeps quiet, doesn't run and makes itself useful cleaning books and licking envelopes while waiting for storytime to begin. Anxious-looking patrons of all ages quickly become accepting ones in Hawkes's soft toned watercolors, and if Miss Merriweather's hair and dress seem a bit stereotypical, occasional CRT monitors balance glimpses of rubber date stamps and a card catalog in his gracious, old style interiors. When Miss Merriweather takes a fall, the lion roars to attract help, then slinks out in shame--but McBee redeems himself by bustling out into the rain to inform the offender that Exceptions to the Rules are sometimes allowed. Consider this a less prescriptive alternative to Eric A. Kimmel's I Took My Frog to the Library (1990), illustrated by Blanche Sims--and it doesn't hurt that the maned visitor is as huge and friendly looking as the one in James Daugherty's classic Andy and the Lion. (Picture book. 6-8) Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 2. This story's appealing premise is clear in the first sentence: "One day, a lion came to the library." There's the expected uproar as the lion pads through the stacks, but librarian Miss Merriweather only asks: "Is he breaking any rules?" The lion is not, and so he is allowed to stay. He makes himself useful and enjoys story hour until Miss Merriweather falls and breaks her arm. The lion roars for help, but his noise prompts a scolding from an uptight, oblivious staff member. The story falters a bit as it explores messages about rules and exceptions in a way that feels both purposeful and a bit convoluted. The warm friendships will easily draw interest, though, as will the handsome, nostalgic pencil-and-acrylic illustrations. Children will easily see themselves in the wild lion, which yearns to explore and enjoy the library but worries about the constraining rules. A fine partner for other library tales, such as Judy Sierra's Wild about Books0 (2004) and Lauren Child's But Excuse Me That Is My Book0 (2006). --Gillian Engberg Copyright 2006 Booklist