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Cover image for Replica. Lyra ; Replica. Gemma
Format:
Title:
Replica. Lyra ; Replica. Gemma
Other title(s):
Lyra

Gemma
ISBN:
9780062394163

9780062394170
Edition:
First edition.
Publication:
New York, NY : Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, [2016]
Physical Description:
236 pages, 284 pages ; 22 cm
Series title(s):
Number in series:
1.
General Note:
Titles from separate title pages; works issued back-to-back and inverted.
Contents:
Replica. Lyra -- Replica. Gemma.
Summary:
"Replica is a "flip book" that contains two narratives in one, and it is the first in a duology. Turn the book one way and read Lyra's story; turn the book over and upside down and read Gemma's story ... Lyra's story begins in the Haven Institute, a building tucked away on a private island off the coast of Florida that from a distance looks serene and even beautiful. But up close the locked doors, military guards, and biohazard suits tell a different story. In truth, Haven is a clandestine research facility where thousands of replicas, or human models, are born, raised, and observed. When a surprise attack is launched on Haven, two of its young experimental subjects--Lyra, or 24, and the boy known only as 72--manage to escape. Gemma has been in and out of hospitals for as long as she can remember. A lonely teen, her life is circumscribed by home, school, and her best friend, April. But after she is nearly abducted by a stranger claiming to know her, Gemma starts to investigate her family's past and discovers her father's mysterious connection to the secretive Haven research facility. Hungry for answers, she travels to Florida, only to stumble upon two replicas and a completely new set of questions"--Publisher's website.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 6 9 185223. English.

Accelerated Reader AR 5.8 10.0 185222.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
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T OLIVER, L
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TEEN OLIVER, L.
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Oliver
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YA FIC OLIVER 2016
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TEEN Oliver, L.
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Oliver, Lauren
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Oliver
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On Order

Summary

Summary

From Lauren Oliver, New York Times bestselling author of Before I Fall and the Delirium trilogy, comes an epic, masterful novel that explores issues of individuality, identity, and humanity.

Lyra's story begins in the Haven Institute, a building tucked away on a private island off the coast of Florida that from a distance looks serene and even beautiful. But up close the locked doors, military guards, and biohazard suits tell a different story. In truth, Haven is a clandestine research facility where thousands of replicas, or human models, are born, raised, and observed. When a surprise attack is launched on Haven, two of its young experimental subjects--Lyra, or 24, and the boy known only as 72--manage to escape.

Gemma has been in and out of hospitals for as long as she can remember. A lonely teen, her life is circumscribed by home, school, and her best friend, April. But after she is nearly abducted by a stranger claiming to know her, Gemma starts to investigate her family's past and discovers her father's mysterious connection to the secretive Haven research facility. Hungry for answers, she travels to Florida, only to stumble upon two replicas and a completely new set of questions.

While the stories of Lyra and Gemma mirror each other, each contains breathtaking revelations critically important to the other story. Turn the book one way and read Lyra's story; turn the book over and upside down and read Gemma's story. The two distinct parts of this novel combine to produce an unforgettable experience for its two young heroines--and its reader.


Author Notes

Lauren Oliver (born Laura Schechter) was born in New York City in 1982. She received degrees in philosophy and literature from the University of Chicago in 2004. She graduated the MFA program at NYU in 2008. She worked briefly as an editorial assistant and an assistant editor at Razorbill, a division of Penguin Books. She left to become a full-time writer in 2009. Her first novel, Before I Fall, was published in 2010. Her other works include Delirium, Liesl and Po, and Pandemonium. Her title's Panic, Vanishing Girls and The Shrunken Head made The New York Times Best Seller List. She made the Hollywood Reporter's '25 Most Powerful Authors' 2016 list, entering at number 23.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up-This unusual piece of fiction will be a winner among teens. Written as a "flip book," the volume has two novels in one. Readers will experience the story from two different characters' perspectives. Sixteen-year-old Gemma has always been sickly and alone most of her life. Her existence changes in a hurry when she is followed and questioned about what she knows about Haven, a secret research facility to which her father seems to have a connection. Eventually, she starts to investigate and travels to Florida, where she finds two replicas who are actually clones who have escaped from the facility. Turning the book over, readers get the story from the viewpoint of Lyra, who is one of the clones. Each point of view can be read in its entirety one at a time or in alternating chapters. Oliver has managed to create different tempos and moods in each tale, which allows readers to better understand the characters. Young adults will enjoy this unique reading experience. While the narrative is accessible to middle and high school readers, occasional strong language will make it a choice for older teens. VERDICT Reading this book in alternating chapters as an ebook could prove challenging, so libraries will want to have this hit available to teens in a print format.-Karen Alexander, Lake Fenton High School, Linden, MI © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Oliver (Vanishing Girls) sacrifices substance for style in a novel told from two perspectives: flipping the book allows readers to read the full story from the point of view of the two main characters, Lyra and Gemma. Lyra, a replica (clone) at the Haven Institute research facility, and Gemma, a loner who has spent her life in and out of hospitals due to various medical troubles, have surprisingly similar stories-both live in relative captivity. When Haven is destroyed, Lyra escapes and crosses paths with Gemma. Gemma, the daughter of one of the men who initially funded Haven, decides to help Lyra and another replica, 72; in the process, she slowly begins to discover the mysterious mandate of the Haven Institute. This ambitious project requires patience during some of the more repetitive parts of these interlocking stories, even as Oliver explores thought-provoking ethical and existential terrain. The pieces of Oliver's story all fit together, but the novelty of the storytelling approach doesn't quite compensate for a less-than-compelling plot. Ages 14-up. Agent: Stephen Barbara, Inkwell Management. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

Teens take on scientific conspiracies in this Orphan Black-esque bioethics thriller told twice: readers are invited to start at either end of the volume, reading one girls story or the other to the end, or to alternate back and forth. The only home Lyra has ever known is a bioresearch facility called Haven. Lyra is a replica (or clone) who isnt supposed to have a name at all -- shes called 24. For her whole life she has watched the clones around her become sick while doctors try to figure out what makes clones less viable than regular humans. Gemma is an overprotected rich girl who has grown up in and out of hospitals. Both Gemma and Lyra find themselves with a sudden opportunity to escape their prisonlike homes, and they are unexpectedly thrown together when Gemma discovers that her father has a connection to Haven. As in any good thriller, shadowy men in black, car chases, and startling discoveries follow. A major twist in circumstance happens nearly at the end of the events; neither heroine knows the full story, but readers can piece it together after reading both parts. With Olivers clever crafting, readers will be clamoring for the next book in the projected series. sarah hannah gmez (c) Copyright 2016. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Two girls from very different backgrounds find autonomy, strength, and identity as they fight against corporate greed and medical corruption.Gemma was born to rich and powerful parents. Lyra was made in a lab. Both white girls have spent their lives protected behind walls: Gemma, under her parents watchful eyes, and Lyra, under the care of nurses at the Haven Institute. The latter has always known shes a replica, a clone created by doctors from human stem cells. The heavily guarded Haven Institutes activities are shrouded in mystery and speculation, and when an explosion destroys the facility, both girls carefully formed worlds topple in the aftermath. Events unfold quicklynbsp;as Gemma and Lyra learn theyre not who they thought they were, that the truth goes much deeper than either ever thought. The dual narrative is presented as two books in one; its up to readers to decide how to proceed: read each girls story separately or in alternating chapters. There are very few characters of color: Caelum, another replica and key secondary character, is described as mixed race; Gemmas Latina best friend has two high-powered moms. Deep-rooted racial and ethnic inequality is hinted at in the birthers, the dark-skinned women who carry and give birth to replicated babies and dont speak English. Gemmas fatness is a source of embarrassment, but, unusually, she grows emotionally without losing weight. A reading experience not to be missedor forgotten. (Science fiction. 15 up) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Oliver revives a standard dystopian story of human clones and government conspiracies with a high-concept premise in this near-future sf novel, the first in a planned duology. Two girls' narratives are bound together in this flip book, which readers must literally turn over to get from one protagonist's story to the other. Lyra is #24 of thousands of experimental subjects at Haven, a clandestine research facility. Gemma is a self-conscious teen with controlling parents, a dismal social life, and a history of health problems. The two meet on the night protesters bomb Haven, and they begin working together to discover Haven's secrets and how their lives are inextricably entwined. Lyra's story has intensity and a distinctive voice, and her depiction of life in Haven is chilling; Gemma's is a more conventional teen mystery. How the two stories intersect is clever, as is how the structure mirrors the themes of identity formation and individuality, but both feel slight and lack a satisfying resolution. The unique format will draw in readers, though, and strong writing will keep them hooked. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Oliver's dystopian Delirium trilogy achieved best-seller status, and she's been gaining steam ever since. Teens will line up for this one.--Hutley, Krista Copyright 2016 Booklist


New York Review of Books Review

Half of "Replica" is told from the perspective of a suburban teenager named Gemma. Flip the book over, and you get a version of the same events through the eyes of a teenage girl named Lyra. That format might have been clunky or hokey, but Oliver ("Vanishing Girls") makes it work. Lyra's story starts at the Haven Institute, a research facility off the Florida coast where she and other "replicas," or clones, have been produced. After a bomb destroys Haven, Lyra, along with 72, a male replica, must escape. On the mainland, Lyra's regimented existence is suddenly uncertain. What experiments had the doctors been conducting on her? Why did touching 72 make her feel so strange? How did the girl who saved them not know she herself was a replica? That girl is Gemma, whose story is the more suspenseful. Self-conscious and privileged, Gemma has her own questions: Why did her father leave his pharmaceutical company? What did her memories of a statue of a "kneeling god" mean? "Replica" has awkward passages. ("Lying gave her a sticky feeling in her chest, like she'd accidentally inhaled a condom.") But others make you stop and ponder. "Wasn't it better to get it over with at once, to let the pain in, to let it take you?" Gemma wonders. "Wasn't it better than these years of puncture wounds and paper cuts, these chafing lies and half-truths, that left you rubbed raw and exposed?" The unfinished feel of the endings invites you to keep contemplating: What makes a human human?