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Cover image for The communist manifesto
Format:
Title:
The communist manifesto
ISBN:
9780671499525

9780671678814
Publication Information:
New York : Washington Square Press, [©1964]
Physical Description:
143 pages ; 18 cm
Contents:
The Communist Manifesto -- Bourgeois and Proletarians -- Socialist and communist literature.
Summary:
The Communist Manifesto was written in 1848 as an inflammatory outcry against capitalist exploitation of the working class. The Manifesto calls upon workers of the world to unite and revolt against their oppressors, to abolish private property and free enterprise, and to form a kind of workers' community in which everyone would have an equal share.
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333.79 MAR
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Summary

Summary

This Norton Critical Edition offers a complete historical and philosophical introduction to Marx's Manifesto of the Communist Party.


Summary

The most influential call-to-arms ever written, with a characteristically elegant and acute introduction by the distinguished historian Eric Hobsbawm, asserting the pertinence of the Manifesto today.


Author Notes

Karl Heinrich Marx, one of the fathers of communism, was born on May 5, 1818 in Trier, Germany. He was educated at a variety of German colleges, including the University of Jena.

He was an editor of socialist periodicals and a key figure in the Working Man's Association. Marx co-wrote his best-known work, "The Communist Manifesto" (1848), with his friend, Friedrich Engels. Marx's most important work, however, may be "Das Kapital" (1867), an analysis of the economics of capitalism.

He died on March 14, 1883 in London, England.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Karl Heinrich Marx, one of the fathers of communism, was born on May 5, 1818 in Trier, Germany. He was educated at a variety of German colleges, including the University of Jena.

He was an editor of socialist periodicals and a key figure in the Working Man's Association. Marx co-wrote his best-known work, "The Communist Manifesto" (1848), with his friend, Friedrich Engels. Marx's most important work, however, may be "Das Kapital" (1867), an analysis of the economics of capitalism.

He died on March 14, 1883 in London, England.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Choice Review

The Communist Manifesto is one of the most famous works of political theory, and also one of the most often reprinted. In the past 20 years alone, at least four scholarly editions of the Manifesto have appeared (Norton, Penguin, Signet, and Verso). Isaac (Indiana Univ., Bloomington) gives readers one more, prompting a question: why? This volume offers two distinctive contributions. First, it contains not only the main text (in the standard Moore translation), but also several "early drafts" penned by Engels and the many prefaces to the different language editions. Second, this volume, part of the "Rethinking the Western Tradition" series, focuses not on situating the Manifesto in its historical context but rather on the reception and relevance of the text from 1848 to the present. Five essays by leading scholars in different fields engage with it as a work of political theory (Isaac), social theory (Saskia Sassen), and moral philosophy (Steven Lukes), and consider its historical reception and influence (Stephen Eric Bronner and Vladimir Tismaneanu). Isaac's and Lukes's essays are excellent, yet the volume's audience is ambiguous--some essays speak to the general reader, others to the specialist. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate and research collections. J. Church University of Houston


Library Journal Review

This year's crop of Penguin "Great Ideas" volumes offers another eclectic dozen works that shaped society from the ancient Greeks to the 20th century. The books are fairly no frills, but the price isn't bad. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

The Communist Manifesto is one of the most famous works of political theory, and also one of the most often reprinted. In the past 20 years alone, at least four scholarly editions of the Manifesto have appeared (Norton, Penguin, Signet, and Verso). Isaac (Indiana Univ., Bloomington) gives readers one more, prompting a question: why? This volume offers two distinctive contributions. First, it contains not only the main text (in the standard Moore translation), but also several "early drafts" penned by Engels and the many prefaces to the different language editions. Second, this volume, part of the "Rethinking the Western Tradition" series, focuses not on situating the Manifesto in its historical context but rather on the reception and relevance of the text from 1848 to the present. Five essays by leading scholars in different fields engage with it as a work of political theory (Isaac), social theory (Saskia Sassen), and moral philosophy (Steven Lukes), and consider its historical reception and influence (Stephen Eric Bronner and Vladimir Tismaneanu). Isaac's and Lukes's essays are excellent, yet the volume's audience is ambiguous--some essays speak to the general reader, others to the specialist. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate and research collections. J. Church University of Houston


Library Journal Review

This year's crop of Penguin "Great Ideas" volumes offers another eclectic dozen works that shaped society from the ancient Greeks to the 20th century. The books are fairly no frills, but the price isn't bad. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Introductionp. vii
Principal Dates in the Life of Marxp. xxx
The Communist Manifestop. 1
The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte (Selections)p. 47
The General Law of Capitalist Accumulation (Selections from Chapter 25, Volume I, Capital)p. 65
Bibliographyp. 95
Introductionp. vii
Principal Dates in the Life of Marxp. xxx
The Communist Manifestop. 1
The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte (Selections)p. 47
The General Law of Capitalist Accumulation (Selections from Chapter 25, Volume I, Capital)p. 65
Bibliographyp. 95