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Cover image for John Muir : apostle of nature
Format:
Title:
John Muir : apostle of nature
ISBN:
9780806127125

9780806127972
Publication:
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, [1995]
Publication Information (alt. graph.):
��1995
Physical Description:
xxvii, 302 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Number in series:
v. 8.
Contents:
Dunbar days -- Fountain Lake and Hickory Hill -- Madison years -- Canada and Indianapolis -- The thousand-mile walk -- First summer in the Sierra -- Incomparable valley -- The sage of Concord -- Mountaineer-glaciologist of the Sierra -- "Studes in the Sierra" -- King Sequoia -- New directions -- First trip to Alaska -- Stickeen -- The cruise of the Corwin -- Fruit grower -- Yosemite National Park -- The Sierra Club -- The National Forestry Commission -- The Harriman-Alaska expedition -- Roosevelt, round the world, and recession -- The contest for Hetch Hetchy -- Home-going -- Lore of a literary naturalist.
Summary:
Nearly a century after John Muir's death, his works remain in print, his name is familiar, and his thought is much with us. How Muir's life made him a leader and brought him insights destined to resonate for decades is the central question underlying this biography by Thurman Wilkins. Born in Scotland, Muir came from a stern background of religious fundamentalism. Life grew sterner yet when the family immigrated to the United States and undertook the backbreaking task of developing a farm in Wisconsin, but Muir's fertile mind enabled him to escape farm drudgery by means of bizarre inventions. Armed with a university introduction to geology and botany, he became a consummate walker, tramping the Canadian forests, the southeastern woodlands, the Sierra Nevada, and several Alaskan glaciers until he had learned about wilderness at nature's own knee. Profoundly attached to dramatic wild places and plants, and to the Sierra and the redwoods in particular, Muir spearheaded efforts to protect forest areas and have some designated as national parks. Muir's wilderness ethic, as revealed in his books, letters, and journals, rests on his conception of the proper relationship between human culture and wild nature as one of humility and respect for all life. In the last decades of his life, John Muir was committed to preserving wild places for their own sake, because of their spiritual and aesthetic values. He became the acknowledged leader of the preservation wing of the conservation movement, and today the half-million-strong Sierra Club that he founded for mountain advocacy and headed until his death continues to shape legislation and public opinion regarding the wilds. John Muir's views seem scarcely to have aged; he is a vivid continuing presence in preservationism and remains its chief apostle. - Jacket flap.

Documenting his efforts on behalf of conservation and preservation, this biography of naturalist John Muir reveals why he remains a major figure in American environmental history nearly a century after his death.
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921 Muir, John 1995
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Summary

Summary

A biography which explores how Muir's life experiences led to his work in the preservation wing of the conservation movement, contributed to his founding of the Sierra Club, and gave him the insight into nature which has resonated with people for decades. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portlan


Summary

Nearly a century after John Muir's death, his works remain in print, his name is familiar, and his thought is much with us. How Muir's life made him a leader and brought him insights destined to resonate for decades is the central question underlying this biography by Thurman Wilkins.

Profoundly attached to dramatic wild places and plants, and to the Sierra and the redwoods in particular, Muir spearheaded efforts to protect forest areas and have some designated as national parks. Muir's wilderness ethic, as revealed in his books, letters, and journals, rests on his conception of the proper relationship between human culture and wild nature as one of humility and respect for all life.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Muir Wilderness Area, Muir Peak, and Muir Glacier are only a few of the commemorations to this pioneer preservationist, early biocentrist, cofounder of the Sierra Club, and the inspirational force in the successful campaign to protect the Yosemite Valley wilderness by means of national park designation. Wilkins follows Muir from his Scottish boyhood, clouded by a harsh, fundamentalist father, to an adolescence of arduous farmwork in Wisconsin to a lifelong career of exploration and study of wildernesses, particularly those of the western U.S., and vividly relates some of Muir's more perilous adventures on cliffside and snowfield. Muir was an ingenious inventor, an accomplished naturalist who reconstructed the glaciation that formed Yosemite Valley, and a persuasive writer. His religious passion for pristine wilderness, coupled with intelligence and eloquence, swayed many influential citizens, including Teddy Roosevelt, to take up preservation causes. An affectionate, uncluttered tale of an American folk hero. --Brenda Grazis


Choice Review

Wilkins's new biography of Muir is a distinguished contribution to this series. The study is based, as with others in the series, on published primary and secondary materials. Wilkins presents a balanced picture of Muir's Scotch Campbellite background and personal development, his pacifism, his inventive mind, his vital attachment to nature, and the evolution of his wilderness ethic. His role in the development of American conservation thought is discussed in detail, together with his writing, his family life, his triumphs, and his many personal and professional frustrations. Not the least of the merits of this book is the bibliographic essay, which effectively summarizes the enormous body of work published in the last century by and about Muir. Strongly recommended for high school and college students and for general readers who are seeking a relatively brief but comprehensive introduction to the subject. Undergraduate; two-year technical program students. K. B. Sterling; formerly, Harford Community College


Booklist Review

Muir Wilderness Area, Muir Peak, and Muir Glacier are only a few of the commemorations to this pioneer preservationist, early biocentrist, cofounder of the Sierra Club, and the inspirational force in the successful campaign to protect the Yosemite Valley wilderness by means of national park designation. Wilkins follows Muir from his Scottish boyhood, clouded by a harsh, fundamentalist father, to an adolescence of arduous farmwork in Wisconsin to a lifelong career of exploration and study of wildernesses, particularly those of the western U.S., and vividly relates some of Muir's more perilous adventures on cliffside and snowfield. Muir was an ingenious inventor, an accomplished naturalist who reconstructed the glaciation that formed Yosemite Valley, and a persuasive writer. His religious passion for pristine wilderness, coupled with intelligence and eloquence, swayed many influential citizens, including Teddy Roosevelt, to take up preservation causes. An affectionate, uncluttered tale of an American folk hero. --Brenda Grazis


Choice Review

Wilkins's new biography of Muir is a distinguished contribution to this series. The study is based, as with others in the series, on published primary and secondary materials. Wilkins presents a balanced picture of Muir's Scotch Campbellite background and personal development, his pacifism, his inventive mind, his vital attachment to nature, and the evolution of his wilderness ethic. His role in the development of American conservation thought is discussed in detail, together with his writing, his family life, his triumphs, and his many personal and professional frustrations. Not the least of the merits of this book is the bibliographic essay, which effectively summarizes the enormous body of work published in the last century by and about Muir. Strongly recommended for high school and college students and for general readers who are seeking a relatively brief but comprehensive introduction to the subject. Undergraduate; two-year technical program students. K. B. Sterling; formerly, Harford Community College