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Cover image for "The good war" : an oral history of World War Two
Format:
Title:
"The good war" : an oral history of World War Two
ISBN:
9780394531038

9781565843431
Publication Information:
New York : Pantheon Books, ©1984.
Physical Description:
xv, 589 pages ; 24 cm
Contents:
TABLE OF CONTENTS -- A Sunday morning -- John Garcia -- Ron Veenker -- Dennis Keegan -- Peter Ota -- Mayor Tom Bradley -- Yuriko Hohri -- Frank Keegan -- A chance encounter -- Robert Rasmus -- Richard M. (Red) Prendergast -- Tales of the Pacific -- E.B. (Sledgehammer) Sledge -- Maurice E. (Jack) Wilson -- Robert Lekachman -- Peter Bezich -- Anton Bilek -- The good Reuben James -- Bill Bailey -- David Milton -- Rosie -- Peggy Terry -- Pauline Kael -- Sarah Killingsworth -- Evelyn Fraser -- Dellie Hahne -- Betty Basye Hutchinson -- Neighborhood boys -- Mike Royko -- Mayor Tom Bradley -- Paul Pisicano -- Mickey Ruiz -- Jack Short -- Dempsey Travis -- Don McFadden -- Win Stracke -- Johnny DeGrazio -- Reflections on machismo -- John H. Abbott -- Roger Tuttrup -- Ted Allenby -- High Rank -- Admiral Gene LaRocque -- General William Buster -- The bombers and the bombed -- John Ciardi -- Akira Miura -- John Kenneth Galbraith -- Eddie Costello and Ursula Bender -- Jean Wood -- Growing up: here and there -- John Baker -- Sheril Cunning -- Yasuko Kurachi Dower -- Galatea Berger -- Werner Burckhardt -- Jean Bartlett -- Oleg Tsakumov -- Marcel Ophuls -- D-day and all that -- Elliott Johnson -- Joe Hanley -- Charles A. Gates -- Timuel Black -- Rosemary Hanley -- Dr. Alex Shulman -- Frieda Wolf -- Boogie woogie bugle boy -- Maxene Andrews -- Sudden money -- Ray Wax -- George C. Page -- A quiet little boom town -- Lee Oremont -- The big panjandrum -- Thomas G. (Tommy the Cork) Corcoran -- James Rowe -- Hamilton Fish -- John Kenneth Galbraith -- Virginia Durr -- Joe Marcus -- Joseph L. Rauh, Jr. -- W. Averell Harriman -- Earl B. Dickerson -- Flying high -- Lowell Steward -- Up front with pen, camera, and mike -- John Houseman -- Herman Kogan -- Henry Hatfield -- Alfred Duckett -- Milton Caniff -- Garson Kanin -- Bill Mauldin -- Richard Leacock -- Walter Rosenblum -- Crime and punishment -- Alvin (Tommy) Bridges -- Joseph Small -- Hans Gobeler and James Sanders -- Charlie Miller -- Jacques Raboud -- Walter and Olga Nowak -- Erich Luth -- Vitaly Korotich -- Joseph Levine -- A turning point -- Joseph Polowsky -- Galina Alexeyeva -- Mikhail Nikolaevich Alexeyev -- Viktor Andreyevich Kondratenko -- Grigori Baklanov -- Chilly winds -- Telford Taylor -- Eileen Barth -- Arno Mayer -- Anthony Scariano -- Erhard Dabringhaus -- Irving Goff -- Milton Wolff -- Hans Massaquoi -- Is you is or is you ain't my baby? -- Philip Morrison -- John H. Grove -- Marnie Seymour -- Bill Barney -- Father George Zabelka -- Hajimi Kito and Hideko Tamura (Tammy) Friedman -- Victor Tolley -- John Smitherman -- Joseph Stasiak -- Remembrance of things past -- Nancy Arnot Harjan -- Paul Edwards -- Epilogue: boom babies and other new people -- Nora Watson -- Joachim Adler and Marlene Schmidt -- Steve McConnell -- Debbie Cooney -- George Seymour -- Street-corner kids.
Summary:
The dean of oral history evokes the innocent idealism, as well as the terror and horror, of ordinary Americans at home and abroad during World War II.
Conference Subject:
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Library
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940.54 Terkel
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940.54 TERKEL
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940.54 T27
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940.5 TER
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940.54 TERKEL
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940.54 TERKEL
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On Order

Summary

Summary

PULITZER PRIZE WINNER OVER FIVE MONTHS ON THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER LIST


Summary

"The Good War" , for which Studs Terkel won the Pulitzer Prize, is a testament not only to the experience of war but to the extraordinary skill of Terkel as interviewer. As always, his subjects are open and unrelenting in their analyses of themselves and their experiences, producing what People magazine has called "a splendid epic history of World War II." With this volume Terkel expanded his scope to the global and the historical, and the result is a masterpiece of oral history.


Author Notes

Studs Terkel was an actor, writer, and radio host. He was born Louis Terkel on May 16, 1912 in New York City. He took his name from the James T. Farrell novel, Studs Lonigan. Terkel attended the University of Chicago and graduated with a law degree in 1934.

Terkel acted in local stage productions and on radio dramas until he began one of the first television programs, an unscripted show called Studs Place in the early 1950s. In 1952, Terkel began Studs Terkel's Almanac on radio station WFMT in Chicago.

Terkel compiled a series of books based on oral histories that defined America in the 20th Century. Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do received a National Book Award nomination in 1975. The Good War: An Oral History of World War II won the Pulitzer Prize in nonfiction in 1985. Working was turned into a hit musical in 1978. Terkel was named the Communicator of the Year by the University of Chicago in 1969. He also won a Peabody Award for excellence in journalism in 1980 and the National Book Foundation Medal for contributions to American letters in 1997. He died on October 31, 2008 at the age of 96.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Studs Terkel was an actor, writer, and radio host. He was born Louis Terkel on May 16, 1912 in New York City. He took his name from the James T. Farrell novel, Studs Lonigan. Terkel attended the University of Chicago and graduated with a law degree in 1934.

Terkel acted in local stage productions and on radio dramas until he began one of the first television programs, an unscripted show called Studs Place in the early 1950s. In 1952, Terkel began Studs Terkel's Almanac on radio station WFMT in Chicago.

Terkel compiled a series of books based on oral histories that defined America in the 20th Century. Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do received a National Book Award nomination in 1975. The Good War: An Oral History of World War II won the Pulitzer Prize in nonfiction in 1985. Working was turned into a hit musical in 1978. Terkel was named the Communicator of the Year by the University of Chicago in 1969. He also won a Peabody Award for excellence in journalism in 1980 and the National Book Foundation Medal for contributions to American letters in 1997. He died on October 31, 2008 at the age of 96.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Kirkus Review

In World War II memories, Terkel has found a great, untold story--with fore-shadowings of Vietnam and aftershocks of atomic warfare. Terkel explains the title, matter-of-factly, as the Vietnam, nuclear-war contrast; the testimony--even from those whose lives peaked in WW II--exposes the irony of the phrase. First witness is ""Hawaiian""-Californian John Garcia: in December 1941, as a pipefitter apprentice at Pearl Harbor, he retrieved live and dead bodies from the water and hulls; his girlfriend was killed by misfired American shells, he petitioned FDR to get into service, then was asked his race (great-grandparents?) and, as ""Caucasian,"" separated from ""the other Hawaiians""; on Okinawa, ""I'd get up each day and start drinking. . . . They would show us movies. Japanese women didn't cry. They accepted the ashes stoically. I knew different. They went home and cried."" In that same lead-off section appear the Nisei, uprooted and interned; a child-witness to, and a-participant in, the hysteria; an American-born Japanese, trapped in Japan on a visit. One of the last sections has to do with the Bomb. In an Indiana farm kitchen, Terkel talks with Bill Harney, radar operator on the plane that bombed Nagasaki. In a New York hotel lobby, he talks to Marnie Seymour who, with her husband, worked at Oak Ridge. ""Out of the eighteen couples at the motel we lived in, most have never been able to have children. We are rather fortunate. We have four children. Two have birth defects."" (Later, living in ""very swish"" New Canaan, she'd see the Hiroshima Maidens, brought over by Norman Cousins, at the supermarket.) There are several things to be said about Terkel, and his material. He has sought out people with real, unpredictable, history-brushing (sometimes history-revising) stories--but also persons whose experiences could be called typical, who become archetypal (like Chicago business executive Robert Ramos, ""the skinny nineteen-year-old kid who's gonna prove that he can measure up""). He has a light intermix, too, of onlookers and leaders--yielding comments from both Pauline Kael and a retired admiral on the vacuousness of WW II films (but contrast, as well, between Kael's approval of The Clock and a war bride's contempt). He doesn't, however, construct his groupings mechanically, to make obvious points: blacks, for instance, turn up everywhere; under the rubric ""Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy"" we hear only from Marine Andrews; pronouncements on Vietnam differ, one after another Pacific veteran attests to gratitude for the Bomb. What is inescapable, though, is the recognition of war as brutal, and brutalizing; the reservations about ""the Good War"" utterable only in Vietnam-and-after retrospect. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus Review

In World War II memories, Terkel has found a great, untold story--with fore-shadowings of Vietnam and aftershocks of atomic warfare. Terkel explains the title, matter-of-factly, as the Vietnam, nuclear-war contrast; the testimony--even from those whose lives peaked in WW II--exposes the irony of the phrase. First witness is ""Hawaiian""-Californian John Garcia: in December 1941, as a pipefitter apprentice at Pearl Harbor, he retrieved live and dead bodies from the water and hulls; his girlfriend was killed by misfired American shells, he petitioned FDR to get into service, then was asked his race (great-grandparents?) and, as ""Caucasian,"" separated from ""the other Hawaiians""; on Okinawa, ""I'd get up each day and start drinking. . . . They would show us movies. Japanese women didn't cry. They accepted the ashes stoically. I knew different. They went home and cried."" In that same lead-off section appear the Nisei, uprooted and interned; a child-witness to, and a-participant in, the hysteria; an American-born Japanese, trapped in Japan on a visit. One of the last sections has to do with the Bomb. In an Indiana farm kitchen, Terkel talks with Bill Harney, radar operator on the plane that bombed Nagasaki. In a New York hotel lobby, he talks to Marnie Seymour who, with her husband, worked at Oak Ridge. ""Out of the eighteen couples at the motel we lived in, most have never been able to have children. We are rather fortunate. We have four children. Two have birth defects."" (Later, living in ""very swish"" New Canaan, she'd see the Hiroshima Maidens, brought over by Norman Cousins, at the supermarket.) There are several things to be said about Terkel, and his material. He has sought out people with real, unpredictable, history-brushing (sometimes history-revising) stories--but also persons whose experiences could be called typical, who become archetypal (like Chicago business executive Robert Ramos, ""the skinny nineteen-year-old kid who's gonna prove that he can measure up""). He has a light intermix, too, of onlookers and leaders--yielding comments from both Pauline Kael and a retired admiral on the vacuousness of WW II films (but contrast, as well, between Kael's approval of The Clock and a war bride's contempt). He doesn't, however, construct his groupings mechanically, to make obvious points: blacks, for instance, turn up everywhere; under the rubric ""Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy"" we hear only from Marine Andrews; pronouncements on Vietnam differ, one after another Pacific veteran attests to gratitude for the Bomb. What is inescapable, though, is the recognition of war as brutal, and brutalizing; the reservations about ""the Good War"" utterable only in Vietnam-and-after retrospect. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.