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Cover image for Judy Moody declares independence
Format:
Title:
Judy Moody declares independence
ISBN:
9781419366444

9781419366451

9780763648527
Publication Information:
Prince Frederick, Md. : Recorded Books, ℗2005.
Physical Description:
2 audio discs (1 hr., 45 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Number in series:
06
General Note:
In container (17 cm.).

Title from container.

"Unabridged Fiction"--Container.

"With tracks every 3 minutes for easy book marking"--Container.

Compact disc.
Summary:
After learning about the American Revolution on a family trip to Boston, Massachusetts, Judy Moody makes her own Declaration of Independence and tries to prove that she is responsible enough to have more freedoms, such as a higher allowance and her own bathroom.-- (Source of description not identified).
Reading Level:
7 years and up.
Geographic Term:
Added Author:
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
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J CD FICTION McDonald
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Judy Moody Declares Independence


Summary

When a visit to Boston spurs Judy's interest in Revolutionary heroes and heroines, she's soon on a quest for more independence in this hilarious new episode from Megan McDonald and Peter H. Reynolds. Huzzah!

She, Judy Moody, would hereby, this day, make the Judy Moody Declaration of Independence. With alien rights and her own Purse of Happiness and everything.

Hear ye! Hear ye! Everyone knows that Judy Moody has a mood for every occasion, and now a visit to Boston has put our famous third grader in a revolutionary mood. When Judy meets an English girl named Tori at the Tea Party ship, she is gobsmacked to learn how many liberties her British friend enjoys -- her very own phone, private loo, and pounds of allowance. When a day of cheerfully doing her chores doesn't earn Judy Moody more rights, and staging a revolt in the form of a tea-throwing Boston Tub Party has her dad reading the riot act, Judy is forced into temporary retreat. Who would guess that a real-life crisis involving her brother, Stink, would finally give Judy a chance to show her courageous quick thinking - -and prove her independence, once and for all?


Author Notes

Megan McDonald was born February 28, 1959, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She grew up in the 1960s the youngest of five girls - which later became the inspiration of the Sister's Club. She attended Oberlin College and received a B.A. in English, then she went on to receive a Library Science degree at Pittsburgh University in 1986. Before becoming a full-time writer, McDonald had a variety of jobs working in libraries, bookstores, museums, and even as a park ranger.She was children's librarian, working at Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Minneapolis Public Library and Adams Memorial Library in Latrobe, Pennsylvania. She has received various awards for her storytelling including a Judy Blume Contemporary Fiction Award, a Children's Choice Book award, and a Keystone State Award among others. McDonald has also written many picture books for younger children and continues to write. Her most recent work was the "Julie Albright" series of books for the American public. She currently resides in Sebastopol, California with her husband and pets.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Megan McDonald was born February 28, 1959, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She grew up in the 1960s the youngest of five girls - which later became the inspiration of the Sister's Club. She attended Oberlin College and received a B.A. in English, then she went on to receive a Library Science degree at Pittsburgh University in 1986. Before becoming a full-time writer, McDonald had a variety of jobs working in libraries, bookstores, museums, and even as a park ranger.She was children's librarian, working at Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Minneapolis Public Library and Adams Memorial Library in Latrobe, Pennsylvania. She has received various awards for her storytelling including a Judy Blume Contemporary Fiction Award, a Children's Choice Book award, and a Keystone State Award among others. McDonald has also written many picture books for younger children and continues to write. Her most recent work was the "Julie Albright" series of books for the American public. She currently resides in Sebastopol, California with her husband and pets.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Megan McDonald was born February 28, 1959, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She grew up in the 1960s the youngest of five girls - which later became the inspiration of the Sister's Club. She attended Oberlin College and received a B.A. in English, then she went on to receive a Library Science degree at Pittsburgh University in 1986. Before becoming a full-time writer, McDonald had a variety of jobs working in libraries, bookstores, museums, and even as a park ranger.She was children's librarian, working at Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Minneapolis Public Library and Adams Memorial Library in Latrobe, Pennsylvania. She has received various awards for her storytelling including a Judy Blume Contemporary Fiction Award, a Children's Choice Book award, and a Keystone State Award among others. McDonald has also written many picture books for younger children and continues to write. Her most recent work was the "Julie Albright" series of books for the American public. She currently resides in Sebastopol, California with her husband and pets.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 8

School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-Judy Moody and her family follow the Freedom Trail in Boston and learn cool facts about the American Revolution in this novel by Megan McDonald (Candlewick, 2005). Judy has a great time and makes friends with a girl from England. Judy wants more freedoms like her new friend, so when she gets home she writes her own Declaration of Independence, insisting on certain "alien rights" like more allowance and getting to stay up later. Her parent's won't go along with it, so Judy tries to show that she is more grown up and responsible by doing her chores and being nice to her brother, Stink. When that doesn't work, she has her own Boston Tea Party in the bathtub which only results in a mess and more trouble. Stink falls asleep on the school bus and Judy makes a heroic bike ride to rescue him. Her parents are finally convinced that she has earned a little more freedom. Actress Kate Forbes narrates all the characters' voices with humor, giving them distinct personalities. Youngsters will enjoy Judy's exploits and her quest for the "purse of happiness" while they learn a little bit about the American Revolution along the way.-Teresa Wittmann, Westgate Elementary School, Edmonds, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Favorite characters and unfolding plot lines will draw kids into a host of summer titles. Celebrating the 4th of July, Judy Moody Declares Independence by Megan McDonald, illus. by Peter H. Reynolds. Where else to set a tale about our nation's beginnings than in "Bean Town... the Cradle of Liberty, Birthplace of Ben Famous Franklin and Paul Revere.... `Boston rules,' " says Judy. Fans get a history lesson delivered with humor, as Judy petitions for her own freedoms-such as more allowance. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Horn Book Review

After a trip to Boston's Freedom Trail, Judy proclaims her own independence; meanwhile, her parents question her maturity and Judy struggles to prove she's responsible. When her brother Stink forgets to get off the bus, Judy's quick thinking saves him and earns her the increased freedom she wants. The comical, fast-paced story includes bits of Revolutionary War history. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

Gr. 2-4. Judy Moody's family vacation to historical Boston prompts an epiphany: If the founding fathers didn't want some grumpy old king to be the boss of them, why should Judy put up with dictatorial parents? Back at home she campaigns for her alien rights, among them a higher allowance and freedom from brushing her hair. Staging a bathtub Boston Tea Party backfires, but shortly after Judy learns about Revolutionary War hero Sybil Ludington--Paul Revere's female counterpart--she finds herself instinctively performing a gutsy act that earns her parents' trust. A subplot involving a British acquaintance seems mostly a vehicle for humorous misinterpretations of slang (Judy assumes two pounds of allowance means a very heavy load of money), and not all the factual references are fully explained. But Judy's petitioning for parental concessions will spark recognition in many readers, and in both McDonald's charismatic narrative and Reynolds' line drawings the characterization of a dauntless, endearingly notional third-grader is as spot-on as ever. --Jennifer Mattson Copyright 2005 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-Judy Moody and her family follow the Freedom Trail in Boston and learn cool facts about the American Revolution in this novel by Megan McDonald (Candlewick, 2005). Judy has a great time and makes friends with a girl from England. Judy wants more freedoms like her new friend, so when she gets home she writes her own Declaration of Independence, insisting on certain "alien rights" like more allowance and getting to stay up later. Her parent's won't go along with it, so Judy tries to show that she is more grown up and responsible by doing her chores and being nice to her brother, Stink. When that doesn't work, she has her own Boston Tea Party in the bathtub which only results in a mess and more trouble. Stink falls asleep on the school bus and Judy makes a heroic bike ride to rescue him. Her parents are finally convinced that she has earned a little more freedom. Actress Kate Forbes narrates all the characters' voices with humor, giving them distinct personalities. Youngsters will enjoy Judy's exploits and her quest for the "purse of happiness" while they learn a little bit about the American Revolution along the way.-Teresa Wittmann, Westgate Elementary School, Edmonds, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Favorite characters and unfolding plot lines will draw kids into a host of summer titles. Celebrating the 4th of July, Judy Moody Declares Independence by Megan McDonald, illus. by Peter H. Reynolds. Where else to set a tale about our nation's beginnings than in "Bean Town... the Cradle of Liberty, Birthplace of Ben Famous Franklin and Paul Revere.... `Boston rules,' " says Judy. Fans get a history lesson delivered with humor, as Judy petitions for her own freedoms-such as more allowance. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Horn Book Review

After a trip to Boston's Freedom Trail, Judy proclaims her own independence; meanwhile, her parents question her maturity and Judy struggles to prove she's responsible. When her brother Stink forgets to get off the bus, Judy's quick thinking saves him and earns her the increased freedom she wants. The comical, fast-paced story includes bits of Revolutionary War history. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

Gr. 2-4. Judy Moody's family vacation to historical Boston prompts an epiphany: If the founding fathers didn't want some grumpy old king to be the boss of them, why should Judy put up with dictatorial parents? Back at home she campaigns for her alien rights, among them a higher allowance and freedom from brushing her hair. Staging a bathtub Boston Tea Party backfires, but shortly after Judy learns about Revolutionary War hero Sybil Ludington--Paul Revere's female counterpart--she finds herself instinctively performing a gutsy act that earns her parents' trust. A subplot involving a British acquaintance seems mostly a vehicle for humorous misinterpretations of slang (Judy assumes two pounds of allowance means a very heavy load of money), and not all the factual references are fully explained. But Judy's petitioning for parental concessions will spark recognition in many readers, and in both McDonald's charismatic narrative and Reynolds' line drawings the characterization of a dauntless, endearingly notional third-grader is as spot-on as ever. --Jennifer Mattson Copyright 2005 Booklist