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Cover image for Big chickens
Format:
Title:
Big chickens
ISBN:
9780525475750

9781415655702

9780756989132

9780142410578
Edition:
1st ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Dutton Children's Books, ©2006.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 23 cm
Summary:
While trying to escape from a wolf, four frightened chickens keep getting themselves into the very predicaments they are trying to avoid.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader/Renaissance Learning LG 2.6 0.5.
Added Author:
Holds:

Available:*

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HELAKOSKI
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J PICTURE BOOK - HELAKOSKI
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E/K HEL
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HELAKOSKI
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HELAKOSKI
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E HELAKOSKI
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HELAKOSKI
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HELAKOSKI
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E HELAKOSKI
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E HELAKOSKI
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On Order

Summary

Summary

When four big chickens see a wolf sneaking near their coop, they run into the woods to hide. But for a bunch of big chickens, running away from danger isn't as easy as it looks. As they continue on their way, they wonder:What if they get stuck in a ditch? What if they hit an iceberg in the lake? What if they step into a cow patty? Ewww!

Brimming with silliness and the kind of slapstick humor small children love, here's a rollicking read-aloud with an uplifting message and a very satisfying ending. Henry Cole's hilarious artwork captures all the sly humor.


Author Notes

Leslie Helakoski lives in Lawton, Michigan. Henry Cole lives in Washington, D.C.


Reviews 4

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Helakoski gives a new twist to the old story about a henhouse and a furry predator in this funny story. These four suggestible hens are "chicken" in more ways than one. When they first spy a wolf, they run off to hide in the woods, but are soon frightened by a ditch, and then by a peaceful-looking group of cows, and on and on, until they end up in a cave, where an encounter with actual danger leaves them feeling brave for the first time. Bright pictures convey the comic events with an exaggerated style just right for the story line. There's a satisfying amount of silliness that will leave children giggling at the panic-stricken fowl and the chaos they produce wherever they go. Predictable patterns in the language and in the narrative structure add appeal as well. As fluffy as the hens' tail feathers, this selection will be an enjoyable read-aloud for kids on a lap or in a group.-Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Horn Book Review

When a wolf approaches, four cowardly chickens panic and run into the woods. Then they worry about other dangers such as falling into a ditch or getting chased by cows. They ""squeaked, squirmed, and squealed...until one by one"" they talk themselves into more catastrophes. This silly story with its humorous illustrations ends happily, however, when the chicken's hysteria terrifies the wolf. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.


Kirkus Review

With wordplay reminiscent of Margie Palatini at her best, Helakoski takes four timorous chickens into, then out of, the literal and figurative woods. Fleeing the henhouse after catching sight of a wolf, the pusillanimous pullets come to a deep ditch: " 'What if we can't jump that far?' 'What if we fall in the ditch?' 'What if we get sucked into the mud?' The chickens tutted, putted, and flutted. They butted into themselves and each other, until one by one . . . " they do fall in. But then they pick themselves up and struggle out. Ensuing encounters with cows and a lake furnish similar responses and outcomes; ultimately they tumble into the wolf's very cave, where they "picked, pecked, and pocked. They ruffled, puffled, and shuffled. They shrieked, squeaked, and freaked, until . . . " their nemesis scampers away in panic. Fluttering about in pop-eyed terror, the portly, partly clothed hens make comical figures in Cole's sunny cartoons (as does the flummoxed wolf)--but the genuine triumph in their final strut--" 'I am a big, brave chicken,' said one chicken. 'Ohh . . . ' said the others. 'Me too.' 'Me three.' 'Me four' "--brings this tribute to chicken power to a rousing close. (Picture book. 6-8) Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 2. Four cautious, careful chickens conquer their fears in this lighthearted tale. After spotting a wolf in the barnyard, the birds flee their coop, and then are afraid to return home. Everything scares them--a muddy ditch, a pasture filled with cows, a lake. But they persevere and manage each obstacle--until they arrive, dirty, dusty, dripping, and dazed, at a cave, where they stumble upon the wolf who set off the chain of events. The surprise? This time, it's the wolf that flees, and the triumphant chickens swagger back home with newfound confidence. Helakoski bolsters the slim story with infectious repetition and rhyme that will encourage young listeners to chant along. Cole exaggerates the chickens' bug-eyed terror and smug triumph in expressive, full-page ink-and-watercolor pictures that are sure to provoke giggles, and children will delight in the powerful role reversal as the timid chickens realize that bullies aren't always what they seem and that the scariest fears can be overcome. --Gillian Engberg Copyright 2006 Booklist