Learn more about CCRLS
Reading recommendations from Novelist
Online learning resources
Cover image for Black dragon
Format:
Title:
Black dragon
ISBN:
9780312017743
Edition:
1st ed.
Publication Information:
New York : St. Martin's Press, ©1988.
Physical Description:
410 pages ; 24 cm
General Note:
"A Thomas Dunne book."
Summary:
In addition to being a fast-paced thriller laced with intrigue and murder, this is also a provocative look at the shameful treatment of Japanese-Americans during World War II. In 1944, Lt. Jared Campbell, head of military police at the Manzanar, Calif., internment camp, finds the body of issei (Japan-born) Masao Shido, apparently a case of seppuku (ritual suicide). Campbell then discovers the headless corpse of the camp's Quaker director. With the help of camp police-chief Hank Fukuda, an American-trained criminologist, Campbell tries to solve the mystery. Suspicion centers on Maj. Tadashi (Eddie) Nitta, a one-armed veteran of the Italian campaign. Some complications arise (an aqueduct near Manzanar is bombed by Japanese explosives) and some are built in (Campbell and Nitta's wife Kimiko are in love). Outsiders Campbell, an Okie escaping from the Dust Bowl, and Fukuda, a nisei torn by two cultures, team up to uncover a land-grab scheme directed against Japanese-American property owners. Fighting powers high in the Fourth Army, Campbell becomes a fugitive in a race to save both Fukuda and Kimiko from the insane killer. This is a bleak and effective book that does not gild the sorry racism of the times.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
Searching...
Mitchell, K.
Searching...

On Order

Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

In addition to being a fast-paced thriller laced with intrigue and murder, this is also a provocative look at the shameful treatment of Japanese-Americans during World War II. In 1944, Lt. Jared Campbell, head of military police at the Manzanar, Calif., internment camp, finds the body of issei (Japan-born) Masao Shido, apparently a case of seppuku (ritual suicide). Campbell then discovers the headless corpse of the camp's Quaker director. With the help of camp police-chief Hank Fukuda, an American-trained criminologist, Campbell tries to solve the mystery. Suspicion centers on Maj. Tadashi (Eddie) Nitta, a one-armed veteran of the Italian campaign. Some complications arise (an aqueduct near Manzanar is bombed by Japanese explosives) and some are built in (Campbell and Nitta's wife Kimiko are in love). Outsiders Campbell, an Okie escaping from the Dust Bowl, and Fukuda, a nisei torn by two cultures, team up to uncover a land-grab scheme directed against Japanese-American property owners. Fighting powers high in the Fourth Army, Campbell becomes a fugitive in a race to save both Fukuda and Kimiko from the insane killer. This is a bleak and effective book that does not gild the sorry racism of the times. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Kirkus Review

A grisly murder/suicide at a Japanese internment camp sets off an investigation that leads to the Hearst castle at San Simeon, a gang of aristocratic land thieves, and the corrupt heart of the US Army. The suicide is the menacing head of the criminal element among the Japanese in the California concentration camp at Manzanar. He has disemboweled himself, but who administered the botched coup de grace? The murder victim, on the other hand, is the camp's administrator, a gentleman sympathetic to the plight of the interned American citizens. Who has separated his head from his shoulders? The investigation lands in the lap of Lt. Jared Campbell--a brilliant, poorly educated, slow-talking Okie who heads the camp's detachment of military police. Assisting is Hank Fukuda, a forensic investigator, late of Los Angeles, now interned for his ancestry. Lt. Campbell and Mr. Fukuda at first agree that all signs point to the guilt of Major Eddie Nitta, who has rejoined his family after losing his arm in action with the Rainbow Battalion in Italy. Major Nitta has been heard to threaten both of the dead men. But fortunately for Major Nitta, Lt. Campbell and Mr. Fukuda are not only capable investigators but honest as well, and--contrary to the expectations and desires of the unpleasant Col. Bleecher of Army intelligence--the investigators begin to demolish the pretty bits of evidence against Nitta that Bleecher and his associates have provided. In the meantime, confusing the issue for Lt. Campbell is his deep love for Maj. Nitta's intelligent and lovely wife Nimiko. In Mitchell's hard-cover debut, California seems as menacing as Prussia--all in all, an intriguing and quickly paced WW II thriller. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.