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Cover image for The lying king
Format:
Title:
The lying king
Other title(s):
Tale from the watering hole
ISBN:
9781626345287
Edition:
First edition.
Publication:
Austin, Texas : Greenleaf Book Group Press, [2018]
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 32 cm
Summary:
"Can warthogs fly? Do tigers eat broccoli? For answers, follow along as Warthog lies his way to the throne in this timeless, yet most timely, Tale from the Watering Hole. Will the truth catch up with the king? Find out as Alex Beard's whimsical animals come to life to illuminate real world truths for children of all ages. With a nod to Aesop and Kipling, this funny and pointed parable has lessons for everyone, from the playground to the boardroom and beyond!"--Book flap.
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Summary

Summary

Can warthogs fly? Do tigers eat broccoli?

For answers, follow along as Warthog lies his way to the throne in this timeless, yet most timely, Tale from the Watering Hole.

Will the Truth catch up with the king?

​Find out as Alex Beard's whimsical animals come to life to illuminate real world truths for children of all ages. With a nod to Aesop and Kipling, this funny and pointed parable has lessons for everyone, from the playground to the boardroom and beyond!


Author Notes

Alex Beard is an artist and author. He lives in New Orleans' Garden District in The Pink Elephant with his wife and two children, two dogs, a cat, three turtles, a hedgehog, and a pair of finches.


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-Warthog is a liar. His boasts and lies start small and grow as he gets older. Warthog gets so good at telling lies that when it is time to choose a king, he lies his way to the crown. As king, he lies, cheats, distracts, steals, and is unjust. The other animals find it hard to stand up to his bullying. In time, the king gets so tied up in lies that his subjects finally rise up against him. Warthog, the lying pig, is banished. Consistent with the author's other watering hole picture books, stylized pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations are mainly of animals from continental Africa. White space and text take up most of the pages, with very little room for the illustrations. In conjunction with the conversational text, the narration is cleverly crafted with flowing rhymes and sometimes humorous quips. This combination works well, if somewhat too long for a lapsit book. While children may find a lesson in virtue in Warthog's tale, the book will resonate more with an adult audience and is steeped in allusions to the current political climate. VERDICT An entertaining addition in the vein of the fables of Aesop.-Mindy Hiatt, Salt Lake County Library Services © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Horn Book Review

There once was a king who liked to tell lies. / He said it was day beneath the night skies." The rise and fall of a prevaricating warthog king is illustrated with undistinguished savanna-set, animal-filled art. The story's rhymes are Seussian not in cleverness but in sentiment: they favorably recall the good doctor's championing of the power of the collective voice. (c) Copyright 2019. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

When other animals fail to take a stand, a lying warthog becomes their king with devastating results."A runt who wanted / to be a huge pig," the warthog "started off small," telling tall tales and lying "to feel big." Claiming night is day and rain is dry, the warthog brags how high he can fly, how great and handsome he is. Many find his behavior shameful but do nothing to stop him. As "his fibbing got bolder," the bullying warthog climbs "up on the backs of his lies" to become king, lying to fill his wallet, questioning "all that was right," and turning subjects against one another. But when "all that was false was spoken as true," his lies eventually ensnare him. Beard spins his relevant cautionary tale in droll verse that builds in intensity as the warthog's dishonesty expands. Signature ink-and-watercolor illustrations feature the warthog and his exotic subjects, drawn in neat, black outlines and filled with pale washes. The plain white background calls attention to the hand-lettered text and drama of the narcissistic warthog, who wears an officious sneer and absurd crown, strutting, posing, leaping, denouncing, and accusing his way across pages as stunned animals collapse beneath his lies.This witty, contemporary fable brilliantly champions truth in an era of fake news, alternative facts, and rampant lies. (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.