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Cover image for A game of thrones : the illustrated edition. Book One of a Song of Ice and Fire
Format:
Title:
A game of thrones : the illustrated edition. Book One of a Song of Ice and Fire
ISBN:
9780553808049
Edition:
20th anniversary illustrated edition.
Publication:
New York : Bantam Books, [2016]
Physical Description:
xi, 880 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
Series title(s):
Number in series:
bk. 1.
General Note:
Originally published in slightly different form by Bantam Books in the United States, 1996.

Includes two maps covering the territory of A game of thrones on endpapers.
Summary:
A tale of court intrigues in the land of Seven Kingdoms, a country "blessed by golden summers that go on for years, and cursed by cruel winters that can last a generation." Treachery, murder, incest.

"Long ago, in a time forgotten, a preternatural event threw the seasons out of balance. In a land where summers can last decades and winters a lifetime, trouble is brewing. The cold is returning, and in the frozen wastes to the north of Winterfell, sinister and supernatural forces are massing beyond the kingdom's protective Wall. At the center of the conflict lie the Starks of Winterfell, a family as harsh and unyielding as the land they were born to. Sweeping from a land of brutal cold to a distant summertime kingdom of epicurean plenty, here is a tale of lords and ladies, soldiers and sorcerers, assassins and bastards, who come together in a time of grim omens. Here an enigmatic band of warriors bear swords of no human metal; a tribe of fierce wildlings carry men off into madness; a cruel young dragon prince barters his sister to win back his throne; and a determined woman undertakes the most treacherous of journeys. Amid plots and counterplots, tragedy and betrayal, victory and terror, the fate of the Starks, their allies, and their enemies hangs perilously in the balance, as each endeavors to win that deadliest of conflicts: the game of thrones"--Provided by publisher.
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FANTASY Martin, G.
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Summary

Summary

Published in celebration of the twentieth anniversary of George R. R. Martin's landmark series, this lavishly illustrated special edition of A Game of Thrones --featuring gorgeous full-page artwork as well as black-and-white illustrations in every chapter--revitalizes the fantasy masterpiece that became a cultural phenomenon. And now the mystery, intrigue, romance, and adventure of this magnificent saga come to life as never before.
 
A GAME OF THRONES
A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE: BOOK ONE
With a special foreword by John Hodgman
 
Winter is coming, and in the frozen wastes to the North, sinister and supernatural forces are massing beyond the kingdom's protective Wall. At the center of the conflict lie the Starks of Winterfell, a family as harsh and unyielding as the land they were born to. Sweeping from a region of brutal cold to a distant summertime kingdom of epicurean plenty, here is a tale rife with plots and counterplots, tragedy and betrayal, victory and terror, as each faction endeavors to win that deadliest of conflicts: the game of thrones.


Author Notes

George R. R. Martin was born on September 20, 1948 in Bayonne, New Jersey. He began writing at an early age, selling monster stories for pennies to neighborhood children. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Journalism from Northwestern University. In 1986, he worked as a story editor for the CBS series The Twilight Zone. He was also an executive story consultant, producer and co-supervising producer for CBS's Beauty and the Beast.

In 1970, he sold the story The Hero to Galaxy magazine. Since becoming a full-time writer in 1979, he has written many novels, stories, and series including A Song for Lya, Portraits of His Children, The Pear-Shaped Man, and the Song of Ice and Fire series. He has won numerous awards including five Locus Awards, three Hugo Awards and two Nebula awards. In 2013 he made The New York Times Best Seller List with his titles A Dance with Dragons and A Game of Thrones: a Clash of Kings, a Storm of Swords, a Feast for Crows. His title's Rogues and The Ice Dragon made the New York Times List in 2014. Martin's title, A Knight of Seven Kingdoms, A Song of Fire and Ice novel, made the New York Times bestseller list in 2015. He is number 4 on the Hollywood Reporter's '25 Most Powerful Authors' 2016 list.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 5

Publisher's Weekly Review

The first installment in the engrossing fantasy epic series, A Song of Ice and Fire, opens on a rigid feudal society in a world where the seasons are unpredictable-pleasant summers can last a decade and cruel winters could be scores of years long-creating a hardened and durable people. Up against the ice wall that separates the barbarians and mysterious wild things from civilization, the Stark family has held the north for generations. As the King's Hand, Stark must protect the king whose enemies covet the throne, and the most dangerous of these might be the queen and her family, the Lanisters. While the intricate, compelling story is told in many voices from many perspectives, Tony and Emmy award-winning narrator Roy Dotrice doesn't attempt to perform each of the hundreds of characters. Only occasionally using a different accent or intensity, the tale unfolds in the gruff voice of an old master storyteller enthralling an audience at a hearth. With his British accent and straightforward narration, Dotrice adds a ominous sense of intrigue and doom to the dark and fascinating tale. A Bantam paperback. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Kirkus Review

After a long silence (Portraits of his Children, stories, 1987), the author of the cult The Armageddon Rag (1983) returns with the first of a fantasy series entitled, insipidly enough, A Song of Ice and Fire. In the Seven Kingdoms, where the unpredictable seasons may last decades, three powerful families allied themselves in order to smash the ruling Targaryens and depose their mad king, Rhaegar. Robert Baratheon claimed the throne and took to wife Tywin Lannister's daughter, Cersei; Ned Stark returned north to gloomy Winterfell with its massive, ancient Wall that keeps wildings and unspeakable creatures from invading. Some years later, Robert, now drunk and grossly fat, asks Ned to come south and help him govern; reluctantly, since he mistrusts the treacherous Lannisters, Ned complies. Honorable Ned soon finds himself caught up in a whirl of plots, espionage, whispers, and double-dealing and learns to his horror that the royal heir, Joffrey, isn't Robert's son at all but, rather, the product of an incestuous union between the Queen and her brother Jaime--he murdered Rhaegar despite the latter's surrender. Ned attempts to bargain with Cersei and steels himself to tell Robert--but too late. Swiftly the Lannisters murder the King, consign Ned to a dungeon, and prepare to seize the throne, opposed only by the remaining Starks and Baratheons. On the mainland, meanwhile, the brutal and stupid Viserys Targaryen sells his sister Dany to a barbarian horse-warrior in return for a promise of armies to help him reconquer the Seven Kingdoms. A vast, rich saga, with splendid characters and an intricate plot flawlessly articulated against a backdrop of real depth and texture. Still, after 672 dense pages, were you expecting a satisfying resolution? You won't get it: Be prepared for a lengthy series with an indefinitely deferred conclusion.


Booklist Review

The first volume in Martin's first fantasy saga, A Song of Ice and Fire, combines intrigue, action, romance, and mystery in a family saga. The family is the Starks of Winterfell, a society in crisis due to climatic change that has created decades-long seasons, and a society almost without magic but with human perversity abundant and active. Martin reaches a new plateau in terms of narrative technique, action scenes, and integrating (or not injecting) his political views into the story. He does not avoid a dauntingly large cast and a daunting number of viewpoint shifts, but these are problems seemingly inseparable from the multivolume fantasy genre. Accordingly, one doubts there will be any other comfortable entry point into this example of the genre except at the beginning. Judging by this beginning, however, it promises to repay reading and rereading, from first volume to last, on account of its literacy, imagination, emotional impact, and superb world-building. --Roland Green


New York Review of Books Review

DRAWING THE CURTAIN: MAURICE SENDAK'S DESIGNS FOR opera and ballet, by Rachel Federman. (Prestel, with DelMonico Books and the Morgan Library & Museum, $40.) The late great children's book author may have been most famous for "Where the Wild Things Are," but it turns out he also harbored a passion for music and the stage, and designed sets for productions including "The Nutcracker" and Mozart's "The Magic Flute." A GAME OF THRONES, by George R.R. Martin. Illustrated by Jonathan Burton. (Folio Society, $195.) A slipcased collector's edition - in three lavishly illustrated books - of the first volume in Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" series, which Folio will be publishing in full. THE FLOWER WHISPERER, by Joel Grey. (powerHouse, $65.) The award-winning "Cabaret" actor reveals his lesser-known penchant for flora. This memoir-in-pictures recounts his discovery of his green thumb at the age of 10, and the ensuing lifelong love affair with the mysterious sexuality of flowers and plants that he continues to savor today. SPACE DOGS: THE STORY OF THE CELEBRATED CANINE COSMONAUTS, by Martin Parr and Richard Hollingham. (Laurence King, paper, $16.99.) The celebrated British photojournalist's 1950s images and memorabilia revivify Laika, the first dog to embark on the journey into the cosmos, and her successors, who paved the way for human astronauts during the U.S.-Soviet space race. LEGENDARY ARTISTS AND THE CLOTHES THEY WORE, by Terry Newman. (Harper Design, $35.) René Magritte's bowler hat, Frida Kahlo's vibrant-hued fabrics, Julian Schnabel's all-day pajamas: A veteran fashion journalist surveys 45 artists whose signature outfits were an extension of their work, deepening our impressions of their oeuvres.


Library Journal Review

A Hugo, Nebula, and World Fantasy Award nominee, writer Abraham is renowned for his own fantasy and horror writing as well as experience in adapting Martin's work to sequential art (as in Fevre Dream; "Skin Trade"). Basing their effort on the first novel in Martin's "A Song of Fire and Ice" series, Abraham and Patterson (Farscape) have created two volumes, with an anticipated third forthcoming, that contain half of Dynamite Entertainment's 24-issue comic book series, plus an array of extras, including a too-generous foreword for Volume 1 by Martin, preliminary drawings, and a scene's original-text-to-finished-artwork dissection in Volume 2. Unfortunately, each virtue reveals a vice. While the artwork is consistently handsome and vivid, it fails to convey the medieval grit of the books (and the TV series) when it should. The scripting respects the source text, and fans may enjoy comparing the similarities and differences of the adaptations to the originals. However, only readers already familiar with the material will understand the context of the larger work and the important developments to come, which is necessary to counter the frequent unpleasantness on display. Based on the first two volumes alone, casual readers will wonder what all the fuss is about rather than crave more; stick with the TV show or Martin's original books. Verdict Violence, gore, and sexual content; appropriate for older teens and up. Acceptable for curious fans of Martin and the TV series Game of Thrones and for collections looking to capitalize on their popularity or cross-promote their DVD/Blu-ray sets.-J. Osicki, Saint John Free P.L., NB (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.