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Cover image for Abe Lincoln : his wit and wisdom from A to Z
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Title:
Abe Lincoln : his wit and wisdom from A to Z
ISBN:
9780823424207
Publication:
New York : Holiday House, 2015.
Physical Description:
pages cm
Summary:
Abe Lincoln is known for his many memorable adages. As the sixteenth president he needed all the wisdom he could muster to guide the country through the Civil War, preserve the union, and end slavery. This nontraditional tribute to the president who brought the homespun humor of his humble beginnings to the White House uses the alphabet to organize informat ion about his life and accomplishments.
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J 921 Lincoln, Abraham 2015
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Summary

Summary

Abe Lincoln spoke many memorable adages. As the sixteenth president, he needed great wisdom to guide the country through the Civil War, preserve the Union, and end slavery. This nontraditional tribute to the president who brought the homespun demeanor and humor of his humble beginnings to the White House uses the alphabet to organize a wealth of information about his life and accomplishments. Filled with Lincoln's often humorous proverbs and witty cartoons by John O'Brien, this colorful book takes a thought-provoking look at Old Abe.


Author Notes

Alan Schroeder is the author of acclaimed books such as Ragtime Tumpie, which was an ALA Notable Children's Book, a Booklist Children's Editors' Choice, and a Parents' Choice Award winner, and Minty, an ALA Notable Children's Book and a Time Magazine Best Children's Book of the Year. He lives in California.

John O'Brien is a cartoonist whose work appears in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and other publications. He is the creator of many children's picture books and the illustrator of many more, including Red, White, Blue, and Uncle Who? by Teresa Bateman. He lives in New Jersey.


Reviews 4

School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-This fun picture book offers an upbeat, alphabet book-style look at our 16th president. Along with historical facts about Abraham Lincoln and his times, modish and often comical pen and watercolor illustrations fill the pages of this book. For each leter of the alphabet, there are several related people or concepts; for instance, under M, Schroeder lists Lincoln's wife, Mary Todd, the Mexican War, and the word map (it's explained that Lincoln "tracked the Civil War's progress on a large map on his office wall"). Readers will learn fascinating facts about Lincoln's boyhood, his career as a lawyer and politician in Illinois, and his family. The presidential years focus on legislation signed by Lincoln, such as the Homestead Act and the Transcontinental Railroad Act. Though the Civil War is explored, there is little mention of specific battles. Inserted throughout are witty quotes attributed to Lincoln. Each page is brimming with text and drawings, and readers are sure to linger over the details. However, teachers and librarians should note that there are no citations or sources here, making it less than suitable for essays or reports. VERDICT A light and intriguing introduction to Lincoln, but stick with other sources when directing students to research.-Patricia Ann Owens, formerly with Illinois Eastern Community Colls., Mt. Carmel (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

In a droll companion to a similarly alphabetic title about Benjamin Franklin, Schroeder provides an overview of the 16th president's legacy, his predilections, and some significant events of his era. Each letter introduces several ideas: U stands for union, Uncle Tom's Cabin, and unfinished ("When Lincoln became president in 1861, the Capitol building and the Washington Monument were still unfinished," the explanation reads). O'Brien's ink-and-watercolor art has a farcical sensibility that plays on the mythology surrounding Lincoln. In one image, he boosts a large chicken house over his head, chickens and all: "Lincoln was surprisingly strong. One friend in Indiana recalled seeing him 'carry a chicken house... that weighed at least six hundred pounds.' " With quotations from Lincoln incorporated throughout, it's an amusing and educational portrait of Honest Abe. Ages 6-10. (Feb.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

O'Brien's whimsical ink and watercolor illustrations set the tone for this collection of facts about our sixteenth president. Presented in alphabetical order, with minimal internal connection, facts range from the significant to the quirky: A is for amendment (the thirteenth); autobiography (Lincoln penned a short one); ax (he began clearing land at age seven); and aloud (Lincoln habitually read aloud to better remember ideas). (c) Copyright 2015. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

From Ben Franklin: His Wit and Wisdom from A-Z (2011), the dynamic duo of Schroeder and O'Brien here turn their talents to Abe Lincoln. The alphabetic approach allows them to zero in on fascinating tidbits about both Lincoln himself and historical information pertinent to his past. Each letter is given from two to five entries. For A, Amendment, Autobiography, Ax and Aloud (as in reading) are cited. Many choices are obvious, but others may surprise readers. J is for Jack, a soldier doll that his sons played with. O is for Our American Cousin, the play Lincoln was watching when he was shot. Q is for Quincy (where he debated Douglas), Quorum and Quick (the Gettysburg Address). X is for Xenia, Ohio, where he made one of his railroad stops; the people swarmed the train and ate his lunch. Z is probably the most unusual one, standing for Zouaves, units of volunteer soldiers known for their colorful uniforms. O'Brien's signature style lends the tableaux enormous flair, humor and zing. Comical tiny details are mischievous and clever. On the A page: A boy wearing a fringed shirt is holding an ax next to a gargantuan tube of Lincoln Logs filled with chopped-down trees. The book quotes Lincoln as saying, "Whatever you are, be a good one." This team goes beyond good; they excel at making history real, enjoyable and memorable. (Informational picture book. 5-9) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.