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Cover image for A new coat for Anna
Format:
Title:
A new coat for Anna
ISBN:
9780394874265

9780394974262

9780394898612

9780738316697

9780590416689

9780329108632

9781442013889

9780758732521

9780833512451
Publication:
New York : Alfred A. Knopf, ©1986.
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm.
General Note:
"Distributed by Random House ; Manufactured in the United States of America"--Title page verso.
Summary:
Even though there is no money, Anna's mother finds a way to make Anna a badly needed winter coat.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader LG 3.5 0.5 27478.
Added Author:
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
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JP ZIEFERT
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E ZIEFERT
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E/K ZIE
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On Order

Summary

Summary

A fresh and moving story of a mother's dedication to acquire a coat for her daughter in post WWII hard times. Anna's mother decides to trade the few valuables she has for wool (and for the services of a spinner), a weaver, and a tailor. Lobel's pictures do a tremendous job of evoking the period.--Booklist. ALA Notable Children's Book.


Summary

Even though there is no money, Anna's mother finds a way to make Anna a badly needed winter coat.


Summary

Illus. in full color. "A fresh and moving story of a mother's dedication to acquire a coat for her daughter in post-World War II hard times. Anna's mother decides to trade the few valuables she has left for wool and for the services of a spinner, a weaver, and a tailor. Lobel's pictures do a tremendous job of evoking the period. Insightful and informative, this may make children consider how precious the ordinary can become in times of turmoil."--(starred) Booklist.


Author Notes

Harriet Ziefert is a children's author born in 1941 in New Jersey. She has written several hundred children's books, including the Little Hippo series. Ziefert and illustrator Emilie Bon have collaborated on a series of "Little Hippo" books, the first of which was published in 1988 by Viking Penguin. The books are written for children between 1 1/2 to 5 years-of-age. They are intended to help children deal with change, like the addition of a new baby to the family or moving to a new house.

Her titles include Little Hippo's New Baby, Little Hippo's New Friend, Little Hippo's New School and Grandpa, Will You Play With Me?

(Bowker Author Biography)


Harriet Ziefert is a children's author born in 1941 in New Jersey. She has written several hundred children's books, including the Little Hippo series. Ziefert and illustrator Emilie Bon have collaborated on a series of "Little Hippo" books, the first of which was published in 1988 by Viking Penguin. The books are written for children between 1 1/2 to 5 years-of-age. They are intended to help children deal with change, like the addition of a new baby to the family or moving to a new house.

Her titles include Little Hippo's New Baby, Little Hippo's New Friend, Little Hippo's New School and Grandpa, Will You Play With Me?

(Bowker Author Biography)


Harriet Ziefert is a children's author born in 1941 in New Jersey. She has written several hundred children's books, including the Little Hippo series. Ziefert and illustrator Emilie Bon have collaborated on a series of "Little Hippo" books, the first of which was published in 1988 by Viking Penguin. The books are written for children between 1 1/2 to 5 years-of-age. They are intended to help children deal with change, like the addition of a new baby to the family or moving to a new house.

Her titles include Little Hippo's New Baby, Little Hippo's New Friend, Little Hippo's New School and Grandpa, Will You Play With Me?

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 12

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2 In the tradition of Beskow's Pelle's New Suit (Harper, 1929), Ziefert tells the story of Anna's new coat. In contrast to the warmth of Pelle's Swedish mountain village is the war-torn town in post-World War II Eastern Europe in which Anna and her mother live. While Pelle trades chores for the making of his suit, Anna's mother trades treasured possessions from better daysa gold watch, a teapot, a lamp, and a necklace. Ziefert's writing is clear and succinct, but it is in Lobel's brightly colored paintings that the story truly unfolds. From crumbling rooms cluttered with mementos of a better life to the charm of the tiny sheep farm, the illustrations bring to life another time, another place, and a little girl whose delight in her new coat is just as great as that of many a young reader of this book. The expressiveness of the faces in Lobel's paintings brings life to the story. Ziefert's tale, based on a true story, carries a simple lesson that will be understood and cherished by all ages. Susan Scheps, Bertram Woods Library, Shaker Heights, Ohio (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

A rebuilding of the country after war and the gradual attainment of a much-needed new coat are deftly woven themes, luminously portrayed by Lobel. Ages 4-8. (April) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Kirkus Review

Beskow's classic Pelle's New Suit told the story of outgrown clothing replaced by bartering labor for wool, spinning, weaving, and sewing; now Ziefert sets it in postwar Europe, where Anna's mother trades cherished possessions--a gold watch, a garnet necklace--to acquire the much-needed garment. The war is over, but shops are still empty, even of food, and no one has money. This coat is a year in the making: the wool must grow all winter while Anna shivers in her old coat, the lingonberries for the dye must ripen all summer. When the new red coat is ready at last, Anna, like Pelle, shows it off to everyone who helped make it, and on Christmas Day she returns to thank the sheep. With its boarded-up windows and winter landscapes, this is more sober than most of Lobel's work, although her flair for decorative repetition appears in subtle ways: in the herd of sheep, the hanks of yam, scenes repeated in a mirror. Pictured details, such as the shabby, cozy garret home crowded with surviving treasures and family pictures, add substantial information to the text. A warmly satisfying variation on a familiar story. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Lacking money following World War II, a mother barters with local artisans to secure a badly needed winter coat for her daughter Anna. (D 15 86)


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2 In the tradition of Beskow's Pelle's New Suit (Harper, 1929), Ziefert tells the story of Anna's new coat. In contrast to the warmth of Pelle's Swedish mountain village is the war-torn town in post-World War II Eastern Europe in which Anna and her mother live. While Pelle trades chores for the making of his suit, Anna's mother trades treasured possessions from better daysa gold watch, a teapot, a lamp, and a necklace. Ziefert's writing is clear and succinct, but it is in Lobel's brightly colored paintings that the story truly unfolds. From crumbling rooms cluttered with mementos of a better life to the charm of the tiny sheep farm, the illustrations bring to life another time, another place, and a little girl whose delight in her new coat is just as great as that of many a young reader of this book. The expressiveness of the faces in Lobel's paintings brings life to the story. Ziefert's tale, based on a true story, carries a simple lesson that will be understood and cherished by all ages. Susan Scheps, Bertram Woods Library, Shaker Heights, Ohio (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

A rebuilding of the country after war and the gradual attainment of a much-needed new coat are deftly woven themes, luminously portrayed by Lobel. Ages 4-8. (April) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Kirkus Review

Beskow's classic Pelle's New Suit told the story of outgrown clothing replaced by bartering labor for wool, spinning, weaving, and sewing; now Ziefert sets it in postwar Europe, where Anna's mother trades cherished possessions--a gold watch, a garnet necklace--to acquire the much-needed garment. The war is over, but shops are still empty, even of food, and no one has money. This coat is a year in the making: the wool must grow all winter while Anna shivers in her old coat, the lingonberries for the dye must ripen all summer. When the new red coat is ready at last, Anna, like Pelle, shows it off to everyone who helped make it, and on Christmas Day she returns to thank the sheep. With its boarded-up windows and winter landscapes, this is more sober than most of Lobel's work, although her flair for decorative repetition appears in subtle ways: in the herd of sheep, the hanks of yam, scenes repeated in a mirror. Pictured details, such as the shabby, cozy garret home crowded with surviving treasures and family pictures, add substantial information to the text. A warmly satisfying variation on a familiar story. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Lacking money following World War II, a mother barters with local artisans to secure a badly needed winter coat for her daughter Anna. (D 15 86)


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2 In the tradition of Beskow's Pelle's New Suit (Harper, 1929), Ziefert tells the story of Anna's new coat. In contrast to the warmth of Pelle's Swedish mountain village is the war-torn town in post-World War II Eastern Europe in which Anna and her mother live. While Pelle trades chores for the making of his suit, Anna's mother trades treasured possessions from better daysa gold watch, a teapot, a lamp, and a necklace. Ziefert's writing is clear and succinct, but it is in Lobel's brightly colored paintings that the story truly unfolds. From crumbling rooms cluttered with mementos of a better life to the charm of the tiny sheep farm, the illustrations bring to life another time, another place, and a little girl whose delight in her new coat is just as great as that of many a young reader of this book. The expressiveness of the faces in Lobel's paintings brings life to the story. Ziefert's tale, based on a true story, carries a simple lesson that will be understood and cherished by all ages. Susan Scheps, Bertram Woods Library, Shaker Heights, Ohio (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

A rebuilding of the country after war and the gradual attainment of a much-needed new coat are deftly woven themes, luminously portrayed by Lobel. Ages 4-8. (April) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Kirkus Review

Beskow's classic Pelle's New Suit told the story of outgrown clothing replaced by bartering labor for wool, spinning, weaving, and sewing; now Ziefert sets it in postwar Europe, where Anna's mother trades cherished possessions--a gold watch, a garnet necklace--to acquire the much-needed garment. The war is over, but shops are still empty, even of food, and no one has money. This coat is a year in the making: the wool must grow all winter while Anna shivers in her old coat, the lingonberries for the dye must ripen all summer. When the new red coat is ready at last, Anna, like Pelle, shows it off to everyone who helped make it, and on Christmas Day she returns to thank the sheep. With its boarded-up windows and winter landscapes, this is more sober than most of Lobel's work, although her flair for decorative repetition appears in subtle ways: in the herd of sheep, the hanks of yam, scenes repeated in a mirror. Pictured details, such as the shabby, cozy garret home crowded with surviving treasures and family pictures, add substantial information to the text. A warmly satisfying variation on a familiar story. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Lacking money following World War II, a mother barters with local artisans to secure a badly needed winter coat for her daughter Anna. (D 15 86)