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Cover image for A dog in King Arthur's court
Format:
Title:
A dog in King Arthur's court
Other title(s):
Cavall in Camelot : a dog in King Arthur's court
ISBN:
9780062494481
Edition:
First edition.
Publication:
New York : Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, [2018]
Physical Description:
240 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
Series title(s):
Number in series:
1.
Summary:
In Camelot, King Arthur's dog encounters a world of danger and magic follow Cavall as he embarks on a quest that will put the unbreakable bond between a dog and his person to the ultimate test. When Cavall and his older brother, Glessic, leave the comfort of their simple barn to join the lavish court of Camelot, Cavall wants nothing more than to prove he's a good dog to the great knights and dogs of the castle--especially to King Arthur. But Gless says only the best dogs are worthy of greatness, and Cavall has never been as strong, brave, or fast as his brother. Meanwhile, malevolent forces lurk in Camelot, and Cavall must figure out how to protect his person. To make matters worse, Arthur's mysterious nightmares are threatening to shake his grip on reality and undermine his authority as king. To fight back against the dangers of the dream world, Cavall will need help from some loyal hounds and the enchanting, sometimes frightening creatures who call themselves the fay. In this captivating debut from Audrey Mackaman, Cavall will have to prove not only that he can be a good dog for his person, but that he is capable of a greatness all his own.-- Publisher's description.
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Available:*

Library
Call Number
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JF MACKAMAN
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J Mackaman, A.
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On Order

Summary

Summary

In Camelot, King Arthur's dog encounters a world of danger and magic...

Follow Cavall as he embarks on a quest that will put the unbreakable bond between a dog and his person to the ultimate test.

When Cavall and his older brother, Glessic, leave the comfort of their simple barn to join the lavish court of Camelot, Cavall wants nothing more than to prove he's a good dog to the great knights and dogs of the castle--especially to King Arthur.

But Gless says only the best dogs are worthy of greatness, and Cavall has never been as strong, brave, or fast as his brother.

Meanwhile, malevolent forces lurk in Camelot, and Cavall must figure out how to protect his person. To make matters worse, Arthur's mysterious nightmares are threatening to shake his grip on reality and undermine his authority as king.

To fight back against the dangers of the dream world, Cavall will need help from some loyal hounds and the enchanting, sometimes frightening creatures who call themselves the fay.

In this captivating debut from Audrey Mackaman, Cavall will have to prove not only that he can be a good dog for his person, but that he is capable of a greatness all his own.

Please note that this book has deckle edges (the edges of the paper are purposely rough).


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-In this smart romp, the young deerhound Cavall and his brother Glessic navigate the adventure and intrigue of King Arthur's court. Danger lurks as King Arthur dotes on Cavall and the arrogant Glessic shadows Mordred. Through his escapades and with help from mentors like Merlin and Lancelot's scent-hound, Cavall learns the difference between privilege and entitlement, and between aggression that stems from self-defense, need, or "evil." Mackaman skillfully shapes her dog-characters through their sensory experiences. They "talk" through whines and yips as well as through the slant of a tail or the lowering of a head. Readers recognize Cavall's curiosity and emotional intelligence as he literally sniffs out Arthur and Gwenevere's affection through their mingled smells, or recognizes the scent of maternal fear coming off an attacking bear. Alongside the canine excitement, Mackaman is equally sensitive in representing humans. Arthur comes off as kind and secretly anxious about his leadership, while the pack mentality of the kennels is mirrored at the Round Table. Despite Arthur's goodwill and Cavall's loyalty, the hound wonders why Morgana lives in a scary forest when her son lives in the palace. Emotionally volatile Mordred is full of affection for his mother, resentment for his father, and ambition to be recognized as a ruler. Cavall's curiosity about Mordred promises further adventures to come. Watch for sly references to T.H. White's The Sword in the Stone. VERDICT Dog lovers and fans of medieval adventure will devour this tale (or tail) of King Arthur's court.-Katherine Magyarody, Texas A&M University, College Station © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Cavall is a deerhound puppy who can't keep up with his skilled and boastful brother, Glessic. After both are adopted, Cavall by King Arthur and Glessic by Mordred, they are drawn into the mysterious and sinister world of Camelot. Good-hearted Cavall wants only to protect Arthur and is helped by both Merlin and the Lady of the Lake, whose advice offers wisdom for readers, as well. Gless is bound to Mordred by Morgana, which puts the pups on opposite sides as Mordred tries to drive Arthur mad through a potion that brings terrible nightmares. Relying on his pack and the creatures who advise him, Cavall tries to save Arthur. Debut author Mackaman seamlessly weaves myths of Camelot together with universal lessons, including the best way to defend those one cares about and the merits of cooperation. Cavall's confusion about complicated events and his unintentional blunders make him a relatable and entertaining narrator. This warm and action-packed series kickoff will leave readers eager to see what adventures Cavall stumbles into next. Ages 8-12. Agent: Lauren Galit, LKG Agency. (Aug.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Kirkus Review

A series opener offers a dog's-eye look at Arthurian legend.When readers say, "I had no idea what was going to happen next," it's usually a compliment. Sometimes, though, they mean that the book was rambling and difficult to follow. This fantasy novel falls into both categories. The first quarter of the book is a sort of tourist's guide to Camelot. CavallKing Arthur's dogwanders around the kingdom meeting his new master, chasing deer, and chatting about philosophy with the Lady of the Lake. (The book never challenges the modern, mistaken notion that the major Arthurian characters were white.) When the plot begins to take shape, it centers on Arthur's bad dreams, which makes a strange premise for an adventure story. How can even the bravest dog fight off a dream? But the appeal of the book is that it doesn't always rely on battles or chase scenes to draw readers in. In the tradition of T.H. White, it's about the moral questions that lead people into battle or make them walk away. Cavall says, "I don't think we should hurt people," and "it's important to understand why someone or something wants to hurt you." These sorts of ideas are a surprising and satisfying contrast to the big battles and chase scenes near the end. But some readers might have appreciated a little more foreshadowing before the battle starts, just enough to hint at what happens next. Godbey supplies the chapter heads.The characters are good company; here's hoping Book 2 offers more of a story. (Fantasy. 8-12) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.