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Cover image for The Kill room : a Lincoln Rhyme novel
Format:
Title:
The Kill room : a Lincoln Rhyme novel
ISBN:
9781455517060

9781455573486

9781455517077

9781444757330

9781444757347

9781611132557

9781619696365
Edition:
First edition.
Publication:
New York : Grand Central Publishing, 2013.
Physical Description:
484 pages ; 24 cm
Series title(s):
Summary:
Renowned investigator and forensics expert Lincoln Rhyme is drafted to investigate the sniper-killing of a U.S. citizen in the Bahamas. While his partner, Amelia Sachs, traces the victim's steps in Manhattan, Rhyme leaves the city to pursue the sniper himself.
Holds:

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DEAVER, J. Lincoln Rhyme #10
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MYS DEAVER LINCOLN RHYME #10
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FICTION - DEAVER
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DEAVER
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MYSTERY - DEAVER
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M DEAVER, J LINCOLN BOOK 10
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M DEA
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Deaver, J.
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FIC (M) DEAVER 2013
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MYSTERY DEAVER
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Deaver Lincoln Rhyme v.10
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MYS DEAVER
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DEAVER, Jeffery
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MYSTERY Deaver, J.
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Deaver
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On Order

Summary

Summary

From the author of The Bone Collector, now an NBC TV series.
It was a "million-dollar bullet," a sniper shot delivered from over a mile away. Its victim was no ordinary mark: he was a United States citizen, targeted by the United States government, and assassinated in the Bahamas.
The nation's most renowned investigator and forensics expert, Lincoln Rhyme, is drafted to investigate. While his partner, Amelia Sachs, traces the victim's steps in Manhattan, Rhyme leaves the city to pursue the sniper himself. As details of the case start to emerge, the pair discovers that not all is what it seems.
When a deadly, knife-wielding assassin begins systematically eliminating all evidence--including the witnesses--Lincoln's investigation turns into a chilling battle of wits against a cold-blooded killer.


Author Notes

Jeffery Deaver was born on May 6, 1950 in Chicago, Illinois. He received a degree in journalism from the University of Missouri and a law degree from Fordham University. Before attending law school, he worked as a business writer. After law school, he worked for a Wall Street law firm practicing corporate law. In 1990, he decided to stop practicing law and become a full-time writer.

His first novel was a horror story entitled Voodoo. He is the author of more than 25 novels and has written some of those stories under the pseudonym William Jeffries. He writes the Lincoln Rhyme series and the Kathryn Dance series. A Maiden's Grave was adapted into a film by HBO called Dead Silence and The Bone Collector was adapted into a feature film starring Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie. He received the Steel Dagger and Short Story Dagger from the British Crime Writers' Association, the Ellery Queen Reader's Award for Best Short Story of the Year three times, and the British Thumping Good Read Award.

(Bowker Author Biography) Jeffery Deaver, the author of eighteen other novels of suspense, has been nominated for three Edgar Awards from the Mystery Writers of America & is a two-time recipient of the Ellery Queen Readers Award for Best Short Story of the Year. A lawyer who quit practicing to write full time, he lives in California & Virginia.

(Publisher Provided)


Reviews 5

Publisher's Weekly Review

Deaver returns to his popular Lincoln Rhyme series with this latest installment that finds Rhyme and his partner heading to the Bahamas to investigate the murder of an American citizen by the United States government. Narrated by the trio of Jay Snyder, January LaVoy, and Edoardo Ballerini, the novel comes to life via a series of inspired performances, each as convincing and entertaining as the last. Snyder shines in the lead role, but LaVoy and Ballerini also bend and twist their vocal cords to realistically portray the book's characters. This is a thoroughly enjoyable listen. A Grand Central hardcover. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Kirkus Review

Lincoln Rhyme goes geopolitical. A mile away from a high-caliber rifle, anti-American activist Roberto Moreno falls dead in his Bahamas retreat, along with his guard and a reporter who was interviewing him. Nance Laurel, the New York assistant district attorney who's convinced that the assassinations were the work of an undercover government agency, invites quadriplegic criminalist Lincoln Rhyme and his NYPD lover, Amelia Sachs, to investigate. As usual, the case poses special challenges. The murder scene, presumably awash in forensic evidence, is over a thousand miles from Rhyme's wheelchair, and the Bahamian police aren't eager to share their information. The sinister National Intelligence and Operations Service has already issued orders to liquidate its next target in only a week. NIOS hireling Jacob Swann and another unnamed killer are methodically eliminating evidence and witnesses before they can tell their stories. Even when Rhyme improbably decides to fly to the Bahamas and into a far more generic sort of adventure than his usual--getting stonewalled by uncooperative cops, getting waylaid by hired killers, getting suntanned--the rewards are slim, for he finds crime-scene tape gone from the room where Moreno and the others died; it is being cleaned and painted as he watches (a nice touch). And of course, Deaver, who can't resist any opportunity for ingenuity (XO, 2012, etc.), keeps mixing fastballs, curveballs and change-ups. Even though there are so few suspects, and the guilty parties are so obvious, veteran readers won't trust a single fact until it's been triple-checked, and maybe not even then. Deaver's sleight of hand, so effective on the homefront, carries less weight in a world of international counterterrorism in which it's a given that everybody's trying to kill or discredit everybody else. It's still magic, but it's harder to care when everyone is a magician.]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Lincoln Rhyme, the world-famous criminalist, finds himself in a tricky situation. A New York City assistant district attorney brings him a fascinating case: a man has been murdered, and, according to the prosecutor, the hit was masterminded by the National Intelligence and Operations Service (a sort of fictional version of the NSA). But here's the problem: the victim was assassinated in the Bahamas. To solve the case, Rhyme, a quadriplegic, must find a way to investigate a crime scene a thousand miles away. Deaver takes both Rhyme and Amelia Sachs, his partner, out of their comfort zones (Amelia stays behind in New York, overseeing the local investigation, but without Rhyme's reassuring presence and intellectual inspiration). We see Rhyme and Sachs from a different perspective, more vulnerable than they usually are. Fans of Deaver's tightly plotted thrillers will expect a few right-angle plot twists, and they won't be disappointed: the author leads us down one path, allows us to make certain assumptions, and then yanks us hard in another direction and then does the same thing again, and yet again. Another well-crafted, unpredictable novel from a master of the genre.--Pitt, David Copyright 2010 Booklist


New York Review of Books Review

Any fears that Carl Hiaasen might be mellowing are put to rest by BAD MONKEY (Knopf, $26.95), another rollicking misadventure in the colorful annals of greed and corruption in South Florida. As "the Medicare-fraud capital of America," this is the promised land for those erstwhile "mortgage brokers, identity thieves, arms dealers, inside traders and dope smugglers" who have found more lucrative careers in the health care racket. One swindler, Nicky Stripling, made millions billing Medicare for nonexistent motorized scooters he called Super Rollies. But his luck must have run out, because a tourist trolling for blackfin tuna near Key West has hauled in a hairy (and slightly chewed) human arm traceable via DNA to Stripling. The arm is duly delivered to Miami, "the floating-human-body-parts capital of America," but for reasons that make sense only in a Carl Hiaasen novel, it spends time among the Popsicles in Andrew Yancy's freezer. Smart but hotheaded, Yancy is on suspension from-the county sheriff's office, busted from detective to restaurant inspector. As Yancy sees it, his only hope of getting off "roach patrol" is to make the case, advanced by Stripling's avaricious daughter, that her father's death was no boating accident but a well-planned murder by her nowfilthy-rich stepmother. Meanwhile, Yancy's own homicidal impulses have been stimulated by the next-door neighbor who's building a monumental 7,000-square-foot spec house that will tower over every ramshackle habitat on modest Big Pine Key and, not incidentally, block Yancy's view of the sunset. So he periodically drops off a gift - a dead raccoon, a hive of angry bees, an ominous Santeria shrine, a homeless couple - calculated to scare off potential buyers. Another environmental disaster is under way on Andros Island, an unspoiled Caribbean paradise where the widow Stripling has been sighted in the company of her new boyfriend, a real estate developer intent on building a luxury resort on land snatched from a local fisherman named Neville Stafford. Hiaasen has a peculiar genius for inventing grotesque creatures - like the monstrous voodoo woman known as the Dragon Queen and Driggs, a scrofulous monkey "with a septic disposition" - that spring from the darkest impulses of the id. But he also writes great heroes like Yancy and Neville, who stand up to the "greedy intruders destroying something rare, something that couldn't be replaced." Every Jeffery Deaver thriller poses a daunting challenge - for his forensics expert Lincoln Rhyme as much as for the reader. In THE KILL ROOM (Grand Central, $28), the quadriplegic investigator is frustrated to find himself "a crime scene expert without a crime scene," stuck in his retrofitted Manhattan town-house crime lab while the political assassination he's been asked to investigate took place hundreds of miles away, on the Bahamian island of New Providence. Rhyme finds an ingenious solution to that problem, leaving his colleagues to wrestle with the ethical issue of why a government agency should be involved in a pre-emptive attack on a possible terrorist. Another hallmark of a Deaver novel is the creep factor - creating a villain worthy of becoming Rhyme's adversary. Here it's Jacob Swann, a sadistic killer who gets information from his victims by . . . never mind. What makes Swann such sick fun is that he's also a fantastic cook, full of helpful tips about making a roux or a rib-eye hash, as well as a practiced butcher who uses the same Japanese chef's knife to . . . never mind. Ace Atkins's killing honesty sets a new standard for Southern crime novels. Gone is the fuzzy nostalgia for the old hometown, switched out for a more authentic look at the modern "Mayberry of domestic violence, drug use, child endangerment and roadhouse brawls." That's the world Quinn Colson stepped into when he came home from tours of duty in Afghanistan and Iraq to Jericho, Miss., in rural Tibbehah County. In THE BROKEN PLACES (Putnam, $26.95), the former Army Ranger is now county sheriff and the go-to guy when a pair of inmates break out of Parchman prison and head for Jericho to reclaim the loot from a robbery. The locals are assertive people, vivid enough to hold their own in settings like Mr. Jim's barbershop and the River, the church started by a repentant convict who now "believed in everything he read from the Bible or learned from Johnny Cash." They're even strong enough to withstand a killer tornado. Now here's a quandary: should Jo Nesbo's American fans hang in there until his first novel, THE BAT (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard, paper, $14.95), finally comes out here next month? Or should we snatch up a later novel, THE REDEEMER (Knopf, $25.95), published in Norway before this hard-boiled writer became a global phenomenon? Written in Nesbo's distinctive fast-and-furious style, "The Redeemer" offers insight into the surly attitude that defines Harry Hole, Nesbo's abrasive Oslo detective, who functions best when he's flying solo. ("You can't be in the police for 12 years without being infected by the contempt for humanity that comes with the territory.") The plot is nice and tricky, involving the murder of a Salvation Army "soldier" at the height of the Christmas season and hanging on the identity of a villain known as "the little redeemer" during the fighting in Croatia. Whichever you choose, be assured that both books were translated by Don Bartlett, who seems to relish this tough stuff as much as we do. It's no surprise that Carl Hiaasen's Miami is 'the floating-human-body-parts capital of America.'


Library Journal Review

Deaver's (The Burning Wire) cerebral criminal expert, wheelchair-bound Lincoln Rhyme, here investigates the murder of a prominent anti-American radio commentator in the Bahamas, and all of the clues point to a government-sanctioned hit. As he gets closer to the truth, Rhyme finds himself in extreme danger, and the conclusion is convoluted, complex, and highly emotional. The ethics of drone strikes and the control of the government over virtually every aspect of our lives is hotly debated and highly relevant. This is Deaver at his best, and the trio of readers-Jay Snyder, January LaVoy, and Edoardo Ballerini-do an excellent job of voicing a multitude of characters and of keeping the suspense thrumming until the very end. VERDICT The built-in fan base for the series will welcome this selection; a high-interest item in all public libraries.- Joseph L. Carlson, Vandenberg Air Force Base Lib., Lompoc, CA (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.