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Cover image for Alice in Wonderland ; & Through the looking glass
Format:
Title:
Alice in Wonderland ; & Through the looking glass
Author:
ISBN:
9781402754227

9781402794674
Publication Information:
New York : Sterling, ©2009.
Physical Description:
150 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm.
Series title(s):
Contents:
Alice in Wonderland -- Through the looking-glass.
Summary:
An abridged version of the stories that tell of Alice, who falls down a rabbit hole and steps through a mirror, thereby experiencing unusual adventures with a variety of nonsensical characters.
Added Title:
Through the looking glass.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
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J FIC CLASSIC 2009
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Nothing's more magical than going down the rabbit hole and through the looking glass with Alice. There, in worlds unlike any other ever created, conventional logic is turned upside down and wrong-way round to enchanting effect. Children will love reading Carroll's many humorous nonsense verses and meeting such unforgettable characters as the Mad Hatter, the Knave of Hearts who steals some tarts, and the grinning Cheshire Cat (in Alice in Wonderland ) and Tweedledee, Tweedledum, Humpty Dumpty, and the Jabberwock (in Through the Looking Glass ).


Author Notes

Charles Luthwidge Dodgson was born in Daresbury, England on January 27, 1832. He became a minister of the Church of England and a lecturer in mathematics at Christ Church College, Oxford. He was the author, under his own name, of An Elementary Treatise on Determinants, Symbolic Logic, and other scholarly treatises.

He is better known by his pen name of Lewis Carroll. Using this name, he wrote Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. He was also a pioneering photographer, and he took many pictures of young children, especially girls, with whom he seemed to empathize. He died on January 14, 1898.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Horn Book Review

These adaptations straightforwardly delineate plot but sacrifice atmosphere and language. The resultant retellings are, in the case of these already child-friendly stories, somewhat superfluous. Spot illustrations are more page-filler than enhancement, and the larger art is pleasant but bland (except for their outfits, Anne and Alice could be the same girl). Discussion questions and an afterword are appended to each story. [Review covers these Classic Starts titles: Alice in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass and Anne of Avonlea.] (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.