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Cover image for Shakespeare's secret
Format:
Title:
Shakespeare's secret
ISBN:
9780805073874

9781415622018

9780312371326
Edition:
1st ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Henry Holt and Co., 2005.
Physical Description:
250 pages : portraits ; 21 cm.
Series title(s):
Summary:
Named after a character in a Shakespeare play, misfit sixth-grader Hero becomes interested in exploring this unusual connection because of a valuable diamond supposedly hidden in her new house, an intriguing neighbor, and the unexpected attention of the most popular boy in school.
Reading Level:
Middle School.

620 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader/Renaissance Learning MG 4.0 6.

Accelerated Reader 4.0.

Reading Counts! 6.1.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
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J FIC BROACH 2005
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+ FICTION - BROACH
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+ FICTION - BROACH
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J FICTION - BROACH
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Broach
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J FICTION BROACH
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J FICTION BROACH
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J Broach
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JF BROACH
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JF BROACH
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J Broach, E.
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Hero changed into a T-shirt, grabbed a book, and padded barefoot into her sister's room. The large windows overlooked the backyard. She could see the moonlight streaming over the trees and bushes, making long, crazy shadows across the grass. Was there a diamond hidden out there somewhere? She looked at Beatrice, already settled under the covers. She wanted to tell her about the Murphys, but at the same time, she didn't. She wanted to keep the secret. To have something that belonged only to her.

A missing diamond, a mysterious neighbor, a link to Shakespeare-can Hero uncover the connections?

When Hero starts sixth grade at a new school, she's less concerned about the literary origins of her Shakespearean name than about the teasing she's sure to suffer because of it. So she has the same name as a girl in a book by a dusty old author. Hero is simply not interested in the connections. But that's just the thing; suddenly connections are cropping up all over, and odd characters and uncertain pasts are exactly what do fascinate Hero. There's a mysterious diamond hidden in her new house, a curious woman next door who seems to know an awful lot about it, and then, well, then there's Shakespeare. Not to mention Danny Cordova, only the most popular boy in school. Is it all in keeping with her namesake's origin-just much ado about nothing? Hero, being Hero, is determined to figure it out.

In this fast-paced novel, Elise Broach weaves an intriguing literary mystery full of historical insights and discoveries.

A JUNIOR LIBRARY GUILD SELECTION


Author Notes

Elise Broach is the author of the acclaimed novel Shakespeare's Secret, as well as several picture books. Her newest book is entitled, Masterpiece. She lives in Easton, Connecticut, with her family.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-Elise Broach's debut mystery (Holt, 2005) is a gem. Hero has moved to Maryland with her mother, father, and beautiful older sister named Bernice. Hero's father is a professor of English literature and an expert on William Shakespeare. Hero, named after a character in Much Ado About Nothing, is a veteran of many moves and dreads starting sixth grade at a new school. While Bernice manages well in the new environment and quickly becomes popular, Hero doesn't quite fit in. She finds solace with kindly Mrs. Roth, an elderly neighbor, who informs her that Hero's new home may hold a mysterious million-dollar diamond. Hero grudgingly accepts the help offered by Danny, the police chief's son, and the three delve into Elizabethan history to locate the diamond. They are shocked to discover the jewel may have belonged to Anne Boleyn, but an even bigger revelation changes the trio's lives forever. Along the way, they question the true identity of William Shakespeare. Broach has created a nifty mystery for middle school readers. Her dialogue is realistic, and narrator Jennifer Ikeda gives each character a distinctive voice. An engrossing mystery that touches several historical elements.-Tricia Melgaard, Centennial Middle School, Broken Arrow, OK (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Horn Book Review

When sixth-grader Hero, daughter of a Shakespearian scholar, learns that a mysterious diamond is hidden in her new house, she teams up with eighth-grade heartthrob Danny and an elderly neighbor to find the treasure. Packed with coincidences, contrivances, and sixth-grade angst, this Shakespeare-laden mystery is absorbing until it strains credibility too far. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.


Kirkus Review

Sixth-grader Hero Netherfield knows she's in trouble when, on her first day at her new school in Maryland, a classmate unthinkingly announces that Hero is her dog's name. Despite the inevitable humiliations that ensue, things look up for Hero when she discovers that her family (including her beautiful older sister Beatrice, graphic-designer mom and Shakespeare-obsessed dad) has moved into the "Murphy Diamond House," where a centuries-old, million-dollar diamond might be hidden. Mrs. Roth, the kindly next-door neighbor, plies Hero with cinnamon toast and tantalizing information about said diamond, and they become fast friends with each other . . . and, interestingly, with the cutest, most popular boy in the eighth grade, Danny Cordova. The plot thickens as Mrs. Roth reveals that she is in possession of the Elizabethan necklace that once held the missing Murphy diamond, an artifact that may even help illuminate the much-debated identity of Shakespeare himself. More linear and traditionally evidence-driven than Blue Balliett's Chasing Vermeer (2004), this agreeable history-mystery may have even more appeal to budding sleuths. (author's note, historical timeline) (Fiction. 9-12) Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Gr. 6-9. As usual, sixth-grader Hero's Shakespearean name prompts teasing in her new school, and her loving parents are clueless about her difficulties. Then intriguing, elderly neighbor Mrs. Roth tells her about the enormous diamond rumored to be hidden in Hero's new house. Helped by Mrs. Roth and cute eighth-grader Danny, Hero launches into a stealthy search that unearths links between the diamond's original owner and Edward de Vere, a nobleman believed by some to be the original author of Shakespeare's plays. Broach is an Elizabethan scholar, and she follows the story's detailed historical references with an endnote that further explains the true, fascinating debate about de Vere. The frequent Shakespearean quotes often feel purposeful, and the connections between clues seem too far reaching. But Broach writes with an assured sense of family dynamics and middle-school anxieties, and sophisticated readers, particularly fans of Blue Balliett's Chasing Vermeer (2004), will appreciate the true emotions, the rich language, and the revelations of many-layered mysteries that tie the past to the present. --Gillian Engberg Copyright 2005 Booklist