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Cover image for Munich
Format:
Title:
Munich
ISBN:
9780091959203

9780525520269

9780091959197

9780091959210
Publication:
London, England : Hutchinson, 2018.
Physical Description:
303 pages : map ; 25 cm
Summary:
September 1938. Hitler is determined to start a war. Chamberlain is desperate to preserve the peace. The issue is to be decided in a city that will forever afterwards be notorious for what takes place there. Munich. As Chamberlain's plane judders over the Channel and the Fuhrer's train steams relentlessly south from Berlin, two young men travel with secrets of their own. Hugh Legat is one of Chamberlain's private secretaries; Paul Hartmann a German diplomat and member of the anti-Hitler resistance. Great friends at Oxford before Hitler came to power, they haven't seen one another since they were last in Munich six years earlier. Now, as the future of Europe hangs in the balance, their paths are destined to cross again. When the stakes are this high, who are you willing to betray? Your friends, your family, your country or your conscience?-- Adapted form dust jacket.
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FIC HARRIS 2018
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FICTION - HARRIS
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MCN HARRIS
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MCN HARRIS
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Harris, R.
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FICTION HARRIS
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Harris, R.
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Harris, R.
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Harris, R.
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FIC HARRIS
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HARRIS Robert
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Harris
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On Order

Summary

Summary

FROM THE BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF FATHERLAND , CONCLAVE AND AN OFFICER AND A SPY .

September 1938

Hitler is determined to start a war.

Chamberlain is desperate to preserve the peace.

The issue is to be decided in a city that will forever afterwards be notorious for what takes place there.

Munich.

As Chamberlain's plane judders over the Channel and the F hrer's train steams relentlessly south from Berlin, two young men travel with secrets of their own.

Hugh Legat is one of Chamberlain's private secretaries; Paul Hartmann a German diplomat and member of the anti-Hitler resistance. Great friends at Oxford before Hitler came to power, they haven't seen one another since they were last in Munich six years earlier. Now, as the future of Europe hangs in the balance, their paths are destined to cross again.

When the stakes are this high, who are you willing to betray? Your friends, your family, your country or your conscience?


Author Notes

Author Robert Harris was born in Nottingham, England in 1957. He attended King Edward VII College and Selwyn College. He has worked as a BBC journalist, the Political Editor of the Observer, and a columnist for The Sunday Times and Daily Telegraph. He was named Columnist of the Year by the British Press in 2003. He has written both fiction and nonfiction books and currently lives in Berkshire, England.

His works of fiction include; An Officer and a Spy, The Fear Index, Pompeii, Enigma, Fatherland, Dictator, and Conclave.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

The 1938 Munich peace negotiations form the backdrop for this intelligent novel. Thriller Award-winner Harris (Conclave) presents the diplomatic give-and-take through the perspectives of two friends who have fallen out of touch: Hugh Legat of His Majesty's Diplomatic Service and his Oxford schoolmate, Paul von Hartmann, who serves as a translator for the German Foreign Ministry. For Hugh, the international crisis coincides with the deterioration of his marriage. Paul is recruited by a group of conspirators hoping that Hitler's militarily unrealistic plans to attack Czechoslovakia will lead his generals to support an effort to topple him. Meanwhile, Neville Chamberlain holds vigorous discussions with his cabinet about what he could and should do to avert what he believes will be a civilization-shattering conflict that will cost many British lives over "a quarrel in a faraway country between people of whom we know nothing." Harris succeeds in not only transforming a familiar historical event into a novel of suspense but in making the derided Chamberlain sympathetic. 100,000-copy announced first printing. Agent: Michael Carlisle, Inkwell Management. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Kirkus Review

Old friends reunite in hopes of derailing Hitler's war machine.Harris (Conclave, 2016, etc.) returns to familiar territory in his 12th novel. Hugh Legat and Paul von Hartmann became friends as students at pre-World War II Oxford, where Hartmann, a German national, was a Rhodes scholar. Then each went into the service of his countryLegat is the British prime minister's most junior private secretary, and Hartmann is a member of the German diplomatic corps and one of a group of conspirators who would oust Hitler. The Fhrer's 1938 announcement that he intends to annex the Sudetenland, a German-speaking area of Czechoslovakia, brings the two together again. A German invasion of Czechoslovakia would cause a response from France, and a Franco-German war would necessarily involve the U.K. British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, determined to avoid such a war, calls for a diplomatic solution, and thus Legat and Hartmann become participants in the Conference of Munich. Chamberlain, pursuing a policy of appeasement, advocates the cession of the Sudetenland. Legat and Hartmann join together to try to avert the appeasementLegat because he believes no accommodation will deflect Hitler, and Hartmann because he hopes that if Hitler attempts war the army will move against him. Legat and Hartmann move among real historical characters, and Harris skillfully interpolates them into vivid and accurate settings and situations. In particular the portrayal of Chamberlain, often reviled as the man who brought "peace in our time" while Hitler's forges roared, is humane and sympatheticand the sly suggestion that he may have known full well what he was doing brightens an ending that is, after all, predetermined.Engaging, informative, and quietly suspenseful. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

September 1938. Adolf Hitler has announced that he will cross the Czechoslovakian border in the coming days and seize the Sudetenland. Neville Chamberlain, the British prime minister, is desperate to negotiate a peaceful surrender of the Sudeten territory and avoid an all-out war. Harris, the author of such first-rate historical thrillers as Fatherland (1992) and An Officer and a Spy (2014), tells this gripping story mostly through the eyes of two men: Hugh Legat, the prime minister's private secretary, and Paul von Hartmann, a German diplomat. Legat and Hartmann were friends once, several years ago; now their shared interest in peace may bring them together again, but stopping Hitler is a dangerous undertaking. Harris is a splendid storyteller whose ability to blend reality and fiction seamlessly is virtually unmatched. We know how Chamberlain's efforts to prevent war turned out, of course, but that doesn't stop us from being absolutely riveted to this tautly constructed, compellingly written story. Another surefire best-seller from a consistently fine author of historical fiction. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Expect to be seeing or hearing Harris pretty much everywhere in the new year, from national print and broadcast media to all manner of devices displaying bytes and pixels.--Pitt, David Copyright 2017 Booklist


New York Review of Books Review

IN EVERY MOMENT WE ARE STILL ALIVE, by Tom Malmquist. (Melville House, $25.99.) Based on a true story, this searing autobiographical novel, translated from the Swedish by Henning Koch, depicts a father struggling to cope with the tragic loss of his partner just as their daughter is born. EATING ETERNITY: Food, Art and Literature in France, by John Baxter. (Museyon, paper, $19.95.) A wide-ranging, lavishly illustrated guide to French gastronomy that broadens its subject into the fields of art and literature and the culture at large. Who ever suspected that Proust's famous madeleine almost lost out to a plain slice of toast? THE AFTERLIVES, by Thomas Pierce. (Riverhead, $27.) In Pierce's warm and inventive debut novel, about a heart attack victim who finds the world subtly changed, the feeling that nothing's quite real - that perhaps everything is a fever dream in the narrator's dying brain - nags at him, and at us. NINE CONTINENTS: A Memoir In and Out of China, by Xiaoli Guo. (Grove, $26.) Guo, a writer and filmmaker, grew up in China at a time of deprivation. The Beijing Film Academy introduced her to a more cosmopolitan world; now in London, she has been acclaimed one of Britain's best young novelists. THE WIZARD AND THE PROPHET: Two Remarkable Scientists and Their Dueling Visions to Shape Tomorrow's World, byCharlesC. Mann. (Knopf, $28.95.) The essential debate of environmentalism - to respect limits, or transcend them? - as seen through the lives of two men, William Vogt and Norman Borlaug. THE SABOTEUR: The Aristocrat Who Became France's Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando, by Paul Kix. (Harper/HarperCollins, $27.99.) Dashing and brave, Robert de La Rochefoucauld was a member of the French Resistance who came from an aristocratic family. Kix details his exploits and many death-defying escapes during the war. MUNICH, by Robert Harris. (Knopf, $27.95.) An expertly paced thriller featuring two junior diplomats, once friends at Oxford but now members of the opposing German and British delegations that would seal the fate of Czechoslovakia by permitting the Nazis to occupy it in 1938. RESERVOIR 13, by Jon McGregor. (Catapult, paper, $16.95.) McGregor's fourth novel opens with the disappearance of a teenage girl visiting an English village, but its deeper concern is the passage of time and its effect on local residents. MARTIN RISING: Requiem for a King, by Andrea David Pinkney. Illustrated by Brian Pinkney. (Scholastic, $19.99, ages 9 to 12.) A soaring, poetic account of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the last month of his life. The full reviews of these and other recent books are on the web: nytimes.com/books