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Cover image for The baby beebee bird
Format:
Title:
The baby beebee bird
ISBN:
9780060280833

9780060280840
Publication Information:
New York : HarperCollins World ; London : Hi Marketing, 2001.
Physical Description:
32 pages : chiefly color illustrations ; 31 cm
Summary:
The zoo animals find a way to keep the baby beebee bird awake during the day so that they can get some sleep at night.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.5 0.5 43022.
Added Author:
Holds:

Available:*

Library
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MASSIE
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+ PRESCHOOL - MASSIE
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J PICTURE BOOK - MASSIE
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MASSIE
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MASSIE
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MASSIE
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E MASSIE
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JP Massie
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JP Massie
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E MASSIE
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On Order

Summary

Summary

It is nighttime at the zoo. The animals are asleep. All is still, until. . .

beebeebobbibobbi beebeebobbibobbi beebeebobbibobbi beebeebobbibobbi

The baby beebee bird, new to the zoo, is singing his song. . .ALL NIGHT LONG! Nothing the animals do or say will stop him. Until, that is, they come up with a plan to teach the baby beebee bird that nighttime is really best for sleeping -- especially for little birds.

The Baby BeeBee Bird, originally published in 1963, has been beloved by readers for generations. In this new-sized, full-color edition, Diane Redfield Massie's delectable story has been lovingly reillustrated by Steven Kellogg, creating a captivating bedtime story that is almost as much fun as a visit to the zoo!

Children's Books 2000-NY Public Lib.


Reviews 5

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-First published in 1963 and long out of print, this delightful story has been reborn in a large format and newly illustrated edition. The beebee bird is new to the zoo and sings his song all night long, keeping the other animals awake. They concoct a plan to ensure nighttime quiet so they can sleep. The recasting of the original book from the tiny, petite size with simple cut-out animal shapes and a sweet little bird into this outsized, raucous rendering with an ungainly, gawkish, redheaded beebee retains its appeal and magnifies the playfulness. Kellogg's familiar style is a perfect foil for the frolicking turnabout tale. Creative use of large type exaggerates the noises, and the sounds match the big and tall animals' images and generate boisterous fun. This newly hatched effort is bound to invite enthusiastic participation. Welcome back, beebee bird!-Julie Cummins, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

The zoo animals wish the beebee bird would stop making so much noise and let them get some sleep. First published in 1963, now with all-new illustrations by Kellogg, "the beebee's insistent song shows up here in hot pink type, issuing an irresistible invitation to join in," said PW. Ages 3-6. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Horn Book Review

The baby beebee bird's boisterous nonstop chorus of beebee bobbi beebee bobbi results in a sleepless night for all inhabitants of the zoo. But when the other animals retaliate by raising the roof all day, everyone happily begins sleeping on the same schedule. Kellogg's animals are as gleeful and expressive as ever, and the sweet story and riotous hooting combine for a winning bedtime tale. From HORN BOOK Fall 2001, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Massie's zoo tale from 1963 gets a colorful remake, thanks to a set of typically effervescent illustrations from Kellogg (The Three Sillies, 1999, etc.). Just as the zoo's drowsy denizens are beginning to drift off after closing time, a piercing "beebee bobbibobbi beebee bobbibobbi" rings through the night from the newly arrived baby beebee bird. Cheerfully ignoring a collective roar to PIPE DOWN, the nocturnal singer keeps everyone sleepless until dawn. Weariness and annoyance are writ hilariously large on the faces of Kellogg's rumpled menagerie the morning after. Eager to prevent another long night, the animals bellow out their own "BEEBEEBOBBI" chorus to keep the beebee bird awake all day, so that by nightfall everyone, bird included, is ready for slumber land. Changes in typeface, size, and color add visual interest as well as cues for volume and pacing; simplified backgrounds, often just a large disk representing the sun or moon, will help keep the more easily distracted viewers' attention on the animals. The new oversized format is a distinct improvement, too, since the original was difficult to use in a group setting. Young listeners will find the invitation to chime in on the Beebee Bird's irritating continuo utterly irresistible, but this makes an eminently suitable candidate for bedtime reading nonetheless. Hooray for the return of the baby beebee bird. (Picture book. 4-7) Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Ages 3^-7. This lively bedtime story, first published in 1963, gets a worthy revival in this enlarged edition. The animals at the zoo are tuckered out from a full day of growling, roaring, hissing, and meowing. However, the newest addition to the zoo, the baby beebee bird, has been snoozing all day and is intent on shrilly singing ("beebeebobbi, beebeebobbi") all night long. When the annoying newcomer refuses to hush, the exhausted animals hatch a plan to prevent another nocturnal concert. The animals proceed to declaim "beebeebobbi!" incessantly while the bird attempts, unsuccessfully, to sleep. When night falls, all, including the baby beebee bird, finally rest. The facial expressions on Kellogg's animals loom large, extending (and only occasionally overwhelming) the simple story and giving visual voice to a story big on child appeal. The text has been adapted slightly in the new edition for clarity and to fit the new illustrations. Here's a gentle message with a boisterous refrain. --Amy Brandt