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Cover image for Maddi's fridge
Format:
Title:
Maddi's fridge
ISBN:
9781936261291
Publication:
Brooklyn, NY : Flashlight Press, [2014]
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Summary:
Maddi's fridge is almost empty, while Sophia's fridge is full of food. How can Sophia help her friend Maddi without breaking her promise not to tell anyone?

With humor and warmth, this children's picture book raises awareness about poverty and hunger. Best friends Sofia and Maddi live in the same neighborhood, go to the same school, and play in the same park, but while Sofia's fridge at home is full of nutritious food, the fridge at Maddi's house is empty. Sofia learns that Maddi's family doesn't have enough money to fill their fridge and promises Maddi she'll keep this discovery a secret. But because Sofia wants to help her friend, she's faced with a difficult decision: to keep her promise or tell her parents about Maddi's empty fridge. Filled with colorful artwork, this storybook addresses issues of poverty with honesty and sensitivity while instilling important lessons in friendship, empathy, trust, and helping others. A call to action section, with six effective ways for children to help fight hunger and information on antihunger groups, is also included.
Reading Level:
Elementary Grade.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader 2.6.
Added Author:
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
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Brandt
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JP Bra
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JP BRANDT
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Winner of: 2014 Christopher Award, Books for Young People 2014 ILA Primary Fiction Award 2015 MLA Mitten Award Honor Human Rights in Children's Literature Honor With humor and warmth, this children's picture book raises awareness about poverty and hunger Best friends Sofia and Maddi live in the same neighborhood, go to the same school, and play in the same park, but while Sofia's fridge at home is full of nutritious food, the fridge at Maddi's house is empty. Sofia learns that Maddi's family doesn't have enough money to fill their fridge and promises Maddi she'll keep this discovery a secret. But because Sofia wants to help her friend, she's faced with a difficult decision: to keep her promise or tell her parents about Maddi's empty fridge. Filled with colorful artwork, this storybook addresses issues of poverty with honesty and sensitivity while instilling important lessons in friendship, empathy, trust, and helping others. A call to action section, with six effective ways for children to help fight hunger and information on antihunger groups, is also included.


Author Notes

Lois Brandt is a writing teacher who served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Cameroon, West Africa. She lives in Issaquah, Washington. Vin Vogel is a Brazilian illustrator and designer who has illustrated more than 45 children's and young adult books in his native Portuguese and French. He lives in New York City.


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-In her debut picture book, Brandt addresses an important issue: childhood hunger. Sofia's best friend does not have food at home. After taking on the climbing wall at the park, the girls go to Maddi's apartment. A hungry Sofia looks for a snack and is surprised to find a lone carton of milk in the refrigerator. Maddi admits that her mom does not have enough money to go to the grocery store and makes Sofia promise to keep it secret. At home, Sofia's mother serves a delicious supper of fish and rice. The refrigerator is filled with good things to eat, including her brother's favorite treat, Cheesy Pizza Bombs. Worried about her friend, Sofia smuggles food to school, but fish and eggs are "not good for backpacks." Each afternoon, Sofia tries to follow the nimble Maddi to the top of the climbing wall, but it's too high for her. Maddi encourages her, lending her a hand, and Sofia finally climbs the wall. Wanting to do something for Maddi, Sofia tells her mother about the empty fridge. Together, they go to the store to buy groceries. To Sofia's relief, Maddi is not angry about the broken promise, and the two families share a supper of Cheesy Pizza Bombs. Vogel's digital illustrations portraying the smiling, wide-eyed girls in their city neighborhood are filled with warmth and a sense of community. An endnote provides suggestions for helping friends who have empty refrigerators and directs young readers to a companion website, MaddisFridge.com.-Linda L. Walkins, Saint Joseph Preparatory High School, Boston, MA (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Hungry after playing in the park, Sofia opens the fridge in Maddi's apartment and finds only a carton of milk inside. Maddi explains that her mom doesn't have enough money for much else. Sofia is surprised but promises to keep her friend's secret. Sofia is troubled. Her family's fridge is filled to the brim with food. Even their dog gets treats each night as the family sits down to dinner. She decides to help Maddi but discovers the hard way that some foods, such as fish and eggs, do not travel well in a backpack. After several days, knowing her friend is going hungry is too much to bear, and Sofia decides to tell her mom Maddi's secret. Speaking up releases Sofia from her burden of secrecy. The adults respond appropriately to the challenge, allowing Sofia and Maddi to go back to being kids. Though undeniably purposive, this title is notable. The bright, friendly illustrations soften the topic while still conveying the characters' difficult feelings, such as worry and embarrassment. Gentle, age-appropriate humor releases the tension, keeping readers engaged as Sofia discovers how to best help her friend. A note at the end offers suggestions for helping others in need. A thoughtful and well-executed look at the challenge of childhood hunger. (author's note) (Picture book. 5-8) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Best friends share secrets, but they're also supposed to help each other. While Sofia is the faster runner, Maddi can scale the rock wall, no problem. What is a problem is when the girls go to Maddi's house for a snack and find only milk in the fridge. Maddi, embarrassed, explains that her mom can't afford to buy food and asks Sofia to promise not to tell anyone. Sofia tries to keep her promise, and each night after dinner, she puts leftovers in her backpack for Maddi. Both girls learn that some foods, like fish and eggs, don't travel well. Eventually, Sofia realizes that to be a good friend, she must tell a grown-up to help Maddi and her family. Cartoon-style illustrations, depicting a vibrant and diverse city neighborhood, help soften the difficult issues raised. The final page includes suggestions on how to help others in need and a link to a site for more information on fighting hunger. Food insecurity, childhood hunger, and poverty are treated with tenderness and humor.--Mazza, April Copyright 2015 Booklist