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Cover image for Penny and her marble
Format:
Title:
Penny and her marble
ISBN:
9780062082039

9780062082046

9780062082053

9781480624399

9780606321518
Edition:
1st ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Greenwillow Books, ©2013.
Physical Description:
48 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm.
Series title(s):
Summary:
Penny feels guilty after taking a beautiful blue marble that she sees in Mrs. Goodwin's grass, but gets a pleasant surprise when she goes to return it the next day.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader LG 2.5 .5.

Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.5 0.5 156814.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.2 1 Quiz: 60044.

Accelerated Reader 2.5.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
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Henkes
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+ PRIMARY - HENKES (YELLOW)
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J LEVEL 3 - HENKES
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ER HENKES, K.
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JBB E/K HENKES
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EASY H (GREEN)
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ER HENKES
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READER HENKES
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JER Hen
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JER Hen
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JER Hen
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JER Hen
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JER HENKES
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JER HENKES
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JER Hen
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1-2 Henkes
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Caldecott Medalist Kevin Henkes's award-winning Penny returns in the third easy-to-read story about a sweet and curious mouse, perfect for fans Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse, Owen, and Chrysanthemum.

When Penny spots a marble in Mrs. Goodwin's front yard, she picks it up, puts it in her pocket, and takes it home. It's a beautiful marble--it's big, shiny, blue, smooth, and fast, and Penny loves it. But does the marble really belong to Penny? Penny and Her Marble was named a 2014 Geisel Honor book by the American Library Association. This annual award, given to the most distinguished books for beginning readers, is named for the world-renowned children's author Theodor Geisel, also known as Dr. Seuss.

Kevin Henkes is a master at creating beautifully illustrated books that resonate with young children. The Penny books are new classics for beginning readers and will appeal to fans of Frog and Toad, Little Bear, and Henry and Mudge.

Don't miss Penny's newest adventures in Penny and Her Sled, coming this fall!


Author Notes

Kevin Henkes was born in Racine, Wis. in 1960 and graduated from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. One of four children in his family, Henkes grew up with aspirations of being an artist. As a junior in high school, one of Henkes's teachers awakened his interest in writing. Falling in love with both writing and drawing, Henkes realized that he could do both at the same time as a children's book author and illustrator.

At the age of 19, Henkes went to New York City to get his first book, All Alone, published. Since that time, he has written and illustrated dozens of picture books including Chrysanthemum, Protecting Marie, and A Weekend with Wendell. A recurring character in several of Henkes's books is Lily, an outrageous, yet delightful, individualist. Lily finds herself the center of attention in the books Chester's Way, Julius, the Baby of the World, and Lily's Purple Plastic Purse.

A Weekend With Wendell was named Children's Choice Book by the Children's Book Council in 1986. He recieved the Elizabeth Burr Award for Words of Stone in 1993. Owen was named a Caldicott Honor in 1994. The Year of Billy Miller was named a Newbery Honor book in 2014.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 5

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-In the latest installment in the series, the young mouse is pushing her doll's stroller down the block when she spies a marble on her neighbor's lawn. After furtively looking around, Penny drops it in her pocket and races home. At first she delights in her new treasure, enjoying how smooth it feels between her fingers and how fast it rolls across the floor, but then she is overcome with guilt for taking something that doesn't belong to her. Henkes's nuanced watercolor and ink illustrations capture the shame-filled mouse hiding behind curtains. As she continues to worry, she loses her appetite: "The oranges in the bowl looked like big orange marbles. The peas on her plate looked like little green marbles." After a dream-filled night, Penny decides to put the marble back where she found it. When confronted by Mrs. Goodwin, Penny's "cheeks were hot. She could not speak," but her kind neighbor reassures her that she put the marble on the grass hoping someone would pick it up. Readers will empathize with Penny and her conflicted emotions. The short sentences with plenty of repetition and superb pacing make this title perfect for beginning readers. A treasure.-Linda Ludke, London Public Library, Ontario, Canada (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Henkes ups the emotional stakes in his third book starring Lily, in which guilt hangs heavily over the young mouse. Lily is instantly smitten with the blue marble she discovers on a neighbor's lawn, and she sneaks it into her pocket. Her backward-glancing eyes as she runs home clue readers in that she's ambivalent about her decision, something she considers for the next few chapters. Henkes crystallizes the way guilt worms its way into the mind of someone who suspects she's in the wrong, while putting his heroine at ease in the final pages. Ages 4-8. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

Library ed. 98-0-06-208204-6 $14.89 The jacket illustration signals a slight tonal change in this, Penny's third outing (Penny and Her Song, rev. 3/12; Penny and Her Doll, rev. 9/12). Her upbeat signature color (rose) is replaced by a more subdued robin's-egg blue; Penny looks downward with a pensive expression. Here, she's grappling with serious business: sins of commission and omission, accompanied by childlike guilt. That all three issues receive thoughtful examination without any heavy-handedness is to Henkes's considerable credit. When outside walking her doll, Penny spies a marble on Mrs. Godwin's lawn. "The marble seemed to say, Take me home.'" And Penny does. With just a turn of her head and a movement of her eye, the illustrations show that Penny clearly knows this is something she shouldn't do. She hides her marble and dreams about her furtive act with the imagined consequences escalating during the night. Unwilling to confess her deed to her parents, Penny asks for extra hugs, reinforcing the warmth and support in this close-knit family. But Penny, by herself, finds resolution. Beyond his hallmarks of natural language, illustrations that complement the text, and impeccable pacing, Henkes introduces a new aid for young readers. Thoughts, imaginings, and dreams appear in unboxed frames, while concrete action is shown within borders. That respect for the beginning reader's emerging skills beautifully matches Henkes's respect for Penny and this common crisis of childhood. betty carter(c) Copyright 2013. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Whose marble is it? In this third early reader about a little anthropomorphic mouse named Penny, Henkes continues to plumb the emotional world of childhood as few author/illustrators can. The story begins with Penny taking a walk and pushing her beloved doll, Rose, in a stroller. She heeds Mama's admonition that she "[o]nly go as far as Mrs. Goodwin's house," and when she arrives there, she spies a shiny blue marble at the edge of the lawn. Though unsure whether she should do so, Penny pockets the glinting little orb and scurries home. Later, Penny's conscience bothers her, and the marble hidden in her drawer adopts a presence akin to Poe's telltale heart. She can't bring herself to tell her concerned parents what is bothering her, and after a fitful night's sleep, she goes for another walk to return the marble. Hoping to make a quick getaway after surreptitiously replacing it, Penny is worried when her neighbor approaches. Will Mrs. Goodwin be angry that she took the marble? As it turns out, Mrs. Goodwin purposefully put the marble on her lawn in the hope that someone would find it and take it home as a little treasure. Reassured, Penny thanks Mrs. Goodwin and walks home, imagining herself beside a sea as blue as her new marble. Henkes' characteristically meticulous vignettes both expand the story and provide picture clues to help new readers along. Another gem. (Early reader. 5-8)]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

*Starred Review* One morning, while pushing her doll's stroller past Mrs. Goodwin's house, Penny spies a big, sky-blue marble in her neighbor's grass. After checking that no one is watching, she puts it in her pocket. Back at home, she enjoys playing with her new treasure until she sees Mrs. Goodwin in her yard exactly where Penny had found the marble. Suddenly Penny feels uncomfortable. That feeling grows, making it hard for her to eat or sleep. The next morning, after putting the marble back where she found it, she learns that her neighbor had placed it there in hopes that someone would find and love it. When Penny accepts the marble from Mrs. Goodwin and thanks her, all is well. Through his narratives, Henkes conveys shades of emotions that are common to the human experience yet hard to express in words. It's particularly impressive that he can do so in a book for beginning readers. Told in short sentences and simple words with a natural cadence, the story lays out a moral dilemma, lets the heroine find her own solution, and concludes with a reassuringly good outcome. Expressive ink-and-watercolor illustrations complement the text on every page. This small-scale yet immensely satisfying drama is a fine addition to the Penny series. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Henkes's second book for beginning readers is sure to be as well received as his first, Penny and Her Song (2012).--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2010 Booklist