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Cover image for Brideshead revisited
Format:
Title:
Brideshead revisited
ISBN:
9780754053705

9780792757948
Publication Information:
Bath [England] : Chivers Audio Books ; [Hampton, NH] : [Chivers North America], ℗1989?
Physical Description:
10 audio discs (11 hr., 21 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
"Complete & unabridged."

In one container.
Summary:
A story about the aristocratic Catholic family of Lord Marchmain, set in the period between World War I and World War II.-- (Source of description not identified).
Geographic Term:

Added Author:
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Library
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Status
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Waugh
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CD Waugh, E.
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Charles Ryder's friendship with Sebastian Flyte begins at Oxford in 1923. Carefree days of drinking champagne and driving in the country soon end, however, as Sebastian's health deteriorates. Questions about morality and religion are raised as the radiant tone gives way to a bleak atmosphere of shattered illusion.


Author Notes

Born in Hampstead and educated at Oxford University, Evelyn Waugh came from a literary family. His elder brother, Alec was a novelist, and his father, Arthur Waugh, was the influential head of a large publishing house. Even in his school days, Waugh showed sings of the profound belief in Catholicism and brilliant wit that were to mark his later years.

Waugh began publishing his novels in the late 1920's. He joined the Royal Marines at the beginning of World War II and was one of the first to volunteer for commando service. In 1944 he survived a plane crash in Yugoslavia and, while hiding in a cave, corrected the proofs of one of his novels.

Waugh's early novels, Decline and Fall (1927), Vile Bodies (1930), and A Handful of Dust (1934), established him as one of the funniest and most brilliant satirists the British had seen in years. He was particularly skillful at poking fun at the scramble for prominence among the upper classes and the struggle between the generations. He lived for a while in Hollywood, about which he wrote The Loved One (1948), a scathing attack on the United States's overly sentimental funeral practices. His greatest works, however, are Brideshead Revisited (1945), which has been made into a highly popular television miniseries, and the trilogy Sword of Honor (1965), composed of Men at Arms (1952), Officers and Gentlemen (1955), and The End of the Battle (1961).

(Bowker Author Biography)


Born in Hampstead and educated at Oxford University, Evelyn Waugh came from a literary family. His elder brother, Alec was a novelist, and his father, Arthur Waugh, was the influential head of a large publishing house. Even in his school days, Waugh showed sings of the profound belief in Catholicism and brilliant wit that were to mark his later years.

Waugh began publishing his novels in the late 1920's. He joined the Royal Marines at the beginning of World War II and was one of the first to volunteer for commando service. In 1944 he survived a plane crash in Yugoslavia and, while hiding in a cave, corrected the proofs of one of his novels.

Waugh's early novels, Decline and Fall (1927), Vile Bodies (1930), and A Handful of Dust (1934), established him as one of the funniest and most brilliant satirists the British had seen in years. He was particularly skillful at poking fun at the scramble for prominence among the upper classes and the struggle between the generations. He lived for a while in Hollywood, about which he wrote The Loved One (1948), a scathing attack on the United States's overly sentimental funeral practices. His greatest works, however, are Brideshead Revisited (1945), which has been made into a highly popular television miniseries, and the trilogy Sword of Honor (1965), composed of Men at Arms (1952), Officers and Gentlemen (1955), and The End of the Battle (1961).

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

In this classic tale of British life between the World Wars, Waugh parts company with the satire of his earlier works to examine affairs of the heart. Charles Ryder finds himself stationed at Brideshead, the family seat of Lord and Lady Marchmain. Exhausted by the war, he takes refuge in recalling his time spent with the heirs to the estate before the warÄyears spent enthralled by the beautiful but dissolute Sebastian and later in a more conventional relationship with Sebastian's sister Julia. Ryder portrays a family divided by an uncertain investment in Roman Catholicism and by their confusion over where the elite fit in the modern world. Although Waugh was considered by many to be more successful as a comic than as a wistful commentator on human relationships and faith, this novel was made famous by a 1981 BBC TV dramatization. Irons's portrayal of Ryder catapulted Irons to stardom, and in this superb reading his subtle, complete characterizations highlight Waugh's ear for the aristocratic mores of the time. Fervent Anglophiles will be thrilled by this excellent rendition of a favorite; Irons's reading saves this dinosaur from being suffocated by its own weight. (Dec. 2000) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Jeremy Irons starred in the Emmy Award- and Golden Globe-winning 1981 miniseries based on this, Waugh's 1945 tragicomic novel about the aristocratic Flyte family. So it is only fitting that he narrates this audiobook version, whose publication coincides with the film adaptation (in limited release) starring Emma Thompson and Michael Gambon. Already intimately familiar with the nuances of the text, Irons does great justice to the material, adding dramatic and humorous touches throughout. An excellent work recommended for all audio collections. [Watch the movie trailer at brideshead.notlong.com.--Ed.]--Stephen L. Hupp, West Virginia Univ. Lib., Parkersburg (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this classic tale of British life between the World Wars, Waugh parts company with the satire of his earlier works to examine affairs of the heart. Charles Ryder finds himself stationed at Brideshead, the family seat of Lord and Lady Marchmain. Exhausted by the war, he takes refuge in recalling his time spent with the heirs to the estate before the warÄyears spent enthralled by the beautiful but dissolute Sebastian and later in a more conventional relationship with Sebastian's sister Julia. Ryder portrays a family divided by an uncertain investment in Roman Catholicism and by their confusion over where the elite fit in the modern world. Although Waugh was considered by many to be more successful as a comic than as a wistful commentator on human relationships and faith, this novel was made famous by a 1981 BBC TV dramatization. Irons's portrayal of Ryder catapulted Irons to stardom, and in this superb reading his subtle, complete characterizations highlight Waugh's ear for the aristocratic mores of the time. Fervent Anglophiles will be thrilled by this excellent rendition of a favorite; Irons's reading saves this dinosaur from being suffocated by its own weight. (Dec. 2000) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Jeremy Irons starred in the Emmy Award- and Golden Globe-winning 1981 miniseries based on this, Waugh's 1945 tragicomic novel about the aristocratic Flyte family. So it is only fitting that he narrates this audiobook version, whose publication coincides with the film adaptation (in limited release) starring Emma Thompson and Michael Gambon. Already intimately familiar with the nuances of the text, Irons does great justice to the material, adding dramatic and humorous touches throughout. An excellent work recommended for all audio collections. [Watch the movie trailer at brideshead.notlong.com.--Ed.]--Stephen L. Hupp, West Virginia Univ. Lib., Parkersburg (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.