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Cover image for A know-nothing Halloween
Format:
Title:
A know-nothing Halloween
ISBN:
9780060281854

9780060281861

9780006281856

9780064442527
Edition:
1st ed.
Publication Information:
New York : HarperCollins, 2000.
Physical Description:
48 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm.
Series title(s):
Contents:
Halloween tricks -- Hiding from Halloween -- Where is Doris?
Summary:
Four easily confused friends find their own way to celebrate Halloween.
Added Author:
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
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HALLOWEEN EASY READER SPIRN
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HALLOWEEN EASY READER SPIRN
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JER Spi
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JER Spi
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1-2 SPIRN
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On Order

Summary

Summary

It's Halloween and the Know-Nothings want to celebrate. They want to trick-or-treat and bob for apples, but they don't know anyone named Bob and they don't know " any tricks!

The four silly friends' adventures on Halloween night and their comic interpretations of the popular holiday make this book a perfect treat for beginning readers.


Reviews 4

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-The Know-Nothings are back for more wacky fun. In the first title, Boris, Morris, Norris, and Doris try to celebrate Halloween, but misunderstandings turn ordinary events into humorous escapades. They never do find "Bob" of "bob for apples" fame, and the best trick they can muster is for Floris the dog to stand on four legs. Their misadventures continue in the second book as they plan a parade and dinner in honor of Thanksgiving. Children will especially enjoy the foursome's attempts to catch a wild turkey by acting wild themselves as well as their unsuccessful attempts to "serve" it. The large print and simple texts are just right for new readers and the three short chapters in each book are perfectly paced with action and humor. The cartoonlike illustrations suit the foolish friends' zany antics. Filled with the silliness that many youngsters love, these easy-readers will serve as additional holiday fare.-Maura Bresnahan, Shawsheen School, Andover, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Horn Book Review

The outrageously foolish friends, Boris, Morris, Doris, and Norris, are at it again. They try to celebrate Halloween but can't bob for apples because they don't know anyone named Bob. They try to serve Thanksgiving dinner, but the turkey won't sit still long enough for them to serve him. The whimsical illustrations add visual puns, making these books enjoyable for newly independent readers. From HORN BOOK Spring 2001, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

In the wake of A Know-Nothing Birthday (1997), noodleheads Boris, Morris, Doris and Norris—and their puzzled puppy Floris—begin rambling around the holidays. Here, while Doris is out shopping, the men discuss such activities as bobbing for apples—only they don’t know any Bobs, and they soon tire of waiting for him to bring in the apples. Then a bit of trick-or-treating ends when a sheet-clad ghost sends them fleeing home in panic-stricken rout. Terror temporarily turns to tears when they find a “witch” in the house, and decide that she’s turned Doris into a chair. Even Doris takes off her mask and begins to weep. Readers will cry too, from laughter, at the antics of this addlepated quartet, depicted by Alley in tongue in-cheek-cartoon style. On to Thanksgiving (see below). (Easy reader. 6-8)


Booklist Review

Gr. 1^-2. Boris, Norris, Doris, and Morris (and, of course, the dog, Floris) don't know much, "but they [know] they're friends." In these comical holiday entries in the I Can Read series, the friends show just how goofy they really are. In Talk Turkey, the better of the two books, the friends decide to "serve a turkey for Thanksgiving," so the bird becomes the guest of honor. In Halloween, the buddies learn some tricks and scare themselves. A portrait gallery at the beginning of each book will help new readers keep the characters straight as the conversations heat up and the slapstick begins. Most kids will get the wordplay, the sentence structure is pleasantly uncomplicated, and there's an abundance of action words and sound repetition to enliven the goings-on and make reading them easier. R. W. Alley's cartoon-style artwork adds a layer of inspired mayhem. --Stephanie Zvirin