Learn more about CCRLS
Reading recommendations from Novelist
Online learning resources
Cover image for Aardvarks, disembark!
Format:
Title:
Aardvarks, disembark!
Author:
ISBN:
9780688072063

9780688072070
Edition:
1st ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Greenwillow Books, ©1990.
Physical Description:
40 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
After the flood, Noah calls out of the ark a variety of little-known animals, many of which are now endangered.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
Searching...
E/K JON
Searching...
Searching...
+ PRESCHOOL - JONAS
Searching...
Searching...
J PICTURE BOOK - JONAS
Searching...
Searching...
222.11 JONAS
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

After the flood, Noah calls out of the ark a variety of little-known animals, many of which are now endangered.


Summary

When Noah called the zebras out of the Ark, he thought it was empty, but he was wrong! There were still many unusual animals aboard--from zerens to aoudads. "Totally unique, innovative, and involving....This tour de force concludes with a list of the 132 species of animals pictured in the book, including a pronunciation of the difficult ones, along with a line of information about each. Those now extinct or endangered are indicated....From any perspective it's a masterpiece."--Horn Book.


Author Notes

Ann Jonas was born in Flushing, New York in 1932. She attended Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York. After graduation, she worked in graphic design and married fellow Cooper Union graduate and graphic artist Donald Crews. When her husband's military service took them to Frankfurt, Germany in 1963, she worked for a German advertising agency. They moved back to New York and started a freelance design business where she continued to focus on graphic design and her husband focused on illustrating children's books.

After being urged by her husband and his editor to try her hand at creating picture books, she wrote and illustrated When You Were a Baby in 1982. Her other works include Round Trip, Now Can We Go?, The Quilt, Color Dance, Aardvarks, Disembark!, Splash!, Watch William Walk, and Bird Talk. She died on September 29, 2013 at the age of 81.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Ann Jonas was born in Flushing, New York in 1932. She attended Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York. After graduation, she worked in graphic design and married fellow Cooper Union graduate and graphic artist Donald Crews. When her husband's military service took them to Frankfurt, Germany in 1963, she worked for a German advertising agency. They moved back to New York and started a freelance design business where she continued to focus on graphic design and her husband focused on illustrating children's books.

After being urged by her husband and his editor to try her hand at creating picture books, she wrote and illustrated When You Were a Baby in 1982. Her other works include Round Trip, Now Can We Go?, The Quilt, Color Dance, Aardvarks, Disembark!, Splash!, Watch William Walk, and Bird Talk. She died on September 29, 2013 at the age of 81.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 8

School Library Journal Review

Jonas begins her picture book at a point where most Noah's ark stories end. Once the dove returns with an olive branch, Noah begins the process of unloading the animals. Jonas accompanies Noah on his trip down the mountain past the disembarking animals. Past zebus and tuataras, past margays and aoudads, Noah joins the creatures ready to begin life on Earth again. Jonas' watercolor paintings are striking, introducing dozens of animals rarely seen in picture books. Page layout and design effectively enhance the feeling of descent since the pages open upward, creating a vertical orientation. As Noah proceeds through reverse alphabetical order, the animals increase in size, giving viewers the sensation of standing on the plain as the creatures approach. Adults called upon to read this book may tremble when faced with a daunting list of unfamiliar names to pronounce, but the guide to animals on the last page not only supplies pronunciation help but also provides a brief description of each animal. Growing attention to conservation and the increasingly popular concept of zoos and wildlife refuges as types of modern arks should extend this book's interest and usefulness to those well beyond preschool. As an alphabet book, an introduction to endangered species, and an example of impressive graphic design, Jonas' book brings new dimensions to the Noah story. --Kathy Piehl, Mankato State University, MN (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

From the start, when readers discover this book's pages open vertically instead of horizontally, it's obvious that Jonas ( Color Dance ; Round Trip ) is bent on taking a different approach to the tale of Noah and the Ark. After a brief recap of the familiar Bible story, Noah takes a roll call (aardvarks to zebras) and discovers that there are still many animals waiting to disembark. Readers are then treated to 13 spreads devoted to the more exotic leftovers--such unusual creatures as aurochs and gerenuks, lechwes, peludos and urumutums. Although Jonas's lucid artwork is appealing and her concept intriguing, interest ultimately flags as the book becomes merely a listing, with only a tenuous story line to hold it together. Ages 4-up. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Horn Book Review

Noah discovers many animals he does not recognize waiting to leave the ark. The book concludes with a list of the 132 species pictured and one line of information about each. Those now extinct or endangered are indicated. Realistic, accurate watercolors; an impressive, special book. From HORN BOOK 1990, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

The flood waters have receded, the dove has returned with the olive leaf, and Noah has sent the animals out as they came in, two by two in alphabetical order. But after he ticks off ""zebras,"" there are a lot of animals left, all strange to him. So he calls, ""Everyone, disembark!"" and when at last the Ark is empty, he hurries down the mountain, passing pairs of ""zebus. . . zerens. . .zorils. . .youyous. . .yaks. . .,"" etc.--a grand, labeled cavalcade of curiosities. The ten dozen names become a chant that increases in power as both type size and animals grow larger (""binturongs. . .boobies. . .bandicoots. . .""). The beasts, simply rendered in delicate line and clean watercolor, wend their way serenely down the slope, gather at Ararat's base, and peacefully disperse. A wonderful tour through less-traveled parts of the animal kingdom, and also a plea for conservation: Jonas closes with a list showing which creatures are endangered or extinct. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


School Library Journal Review

Jonas begins her picture book at a point where most Noah's ark stories end. Once the dove returns with an olive branch, Noah begins the process of unloading the animals. Jonas accompanies Noah on his trip down the mountain past the disembarking animals. Past zebus and tuataras, past margays and aoudads, Noah joins the creatures ready to begin life on Earth again. Jonas' watercolor paintings are striking, introducing dozens of animals rarely seen in picture books. Page layout and design effectively enhance the feeling of descent since the pages open upward, creating a vertical orientation. As Noah proceeds through reverse alphabetical order, the animals increase in size, giving viewers the sensation of standing on the plain as the creatures approach. Adults called upon to read this book may tremble when faced with a daunting list of unfamiliar names to pronounce, but the guide to animals on the last page not only supplies pronunciation help but also provides a brief description of each animal. Growing attention to conservation and the increasingly popular concept of zoos and wildlife refuges as types of modern arks should extend this book's interest and usefulness to those well beyond preschool. As an alphabet book, an introduction to endangered species, and an example of impressive graphic design, Jonas' book brings new dimensions to the Noah story. --Kathy Piehl, Mankato State University, MN (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

From the start, when readers discover this book's pages open vertically instead of horizontally, it's obvious that Jonas ( Color Dance ; Round Trip ) is bent on taking a different approach to the tale of Noah and the Ark. After a brief recap of the familiar Bible story, Noah takes a roll call (aardvarks to zebras) and discovers that there are still many animals waiting to disembark. Readers are then treated to 13 spreads devoted to the more exotic leftovers--such unusual creatures as aurochs and gerenuks, lechwes, peludos and urumutums. Although Jonas's lucid artwork is appealing and her concept intriguing, interest ultimately flags as the book becomes merely a listing, with only a tenuous story line to hold it together. Ages 4-up. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Horn Book Review

Noah discovers many animals he does not recognize waiting to leave the ark. The book concludes with a list of the 132 species pictured and one line of information about each. Those now extinct or endangered are indicated. Realistic, accurate watercolors; an impressive, special book. From HORN BOOK 1990, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

The flood waters have receded, the dove has returned with the olive leaf, and Noah has sent the animals out as they came in, two by two in alphabetical order. But after he ticks off ""zebras,"" there are a lot of animals left, all strange to him. So he calls, ""Everyone, disembark!"" and when at last the Ark is empty, he hurries down the mountain, passing pairs of ""zebus. . . zerens. . .zorils. . .youyous. . .yaks. . .,"" etc.--a grand, labeled cavalcade of curiosities. The ten dozen names become a chant that increases in power as both type size and animals grow larger (""binturongs. . .boobies. . .bandicoots. . .""). The beasts, simply rendered in delicate line and clean watercolor, wend their way serenely down the slope, gather at Ararat's base, and peacefully disperse. A wonderful tour through less-traveled parts of the animal kingdom, and also a plea for conservation: Jonas closes with a list showing which creatures are endangered or extinct. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.