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Cover image for Seventeenth summer.
Format:
Title:
Seventeenth summer.
ISBN:
9780396023227

9780671619312
Publication Information:
New York, Dodd, Mead, 1942.
Physical Description:
255 pages 21 cm
Summary:
Seventeen-year-old Angie finds herself in love for the first time the summer after high school graduation.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
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822 DAL
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On Order

Summary

Summary

The Little Women of our time--a vivid portrayal of a girl's first love told in the first person . . .--Booklist.


Summary

What better time than summer for a little romance? Except for Angie, who doesn't really date.Didn'tdate, that is -- until she saw Jack Duluth's cerw cut peeking out over a booth in McKnight's drugstore one night.He looked over at me, smiled, and then sat down again.Thus starts a summer Angie will never forget -- one full of spine chills, total bliss, heartache, and confusion...all the feelling that spell love.


Reviews 6

Publisher's Weekly Review

In the summer between high school and college, 17-year-old Angie falls in love for the first time with local boy Jack Duluth. Their summer romance blossoms, but separation looms. In the fall, Jack's family will move out of state and Angie will leave for college. Julia Whelan's narration hits all the right notes. Her rendition of Angie perfectly conveys the innocence, naivete, yearning, anxiety, and rapture of a young girl discovering love for the first time. She is equally adept at capturing Jack, with his deeper voice, humble honesty, and "aw-shucks" country twang. Whelan also ably responds to directions in the text, e.g., when Angie's sister is described as speaking in a falsely bright, overly casual voice, Whelan nails her tone exactly. This audio is as breezy, touching, and enjoyable as a summer romance. Ages 12-up. A Simon Pulse paperback. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

Often casually lumped with the formula teen romances it inspired, Maureen Daly's novel of more than sixty years ago was and remains a true original. The story of Angie's first love is richly textured by the evocation of its small-town Wisconsin setting; Angie's relationships with her parents and sisters also add depth. While references clearly reveal the book to be an artifact from another era, the writing is lyrical but spare, not florid but intensely romantic. From HORN BOOK Spring 2003, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

A small Wisconsin town is the background for a story that transcends its 1940s aura in its depiction of the angst and awe of a teenage girl's first love.


Publisher's Weekly Review

In the summer between high school and college, 17-year-old Angie falls in love for the first time with local boy Jack Duluth. Their summer romance blossoms, but separation looms. In the fall, Jack's family will move out of state and Angie will leave for college. Julia Whelan's narration hits all the right notes. Her rendition of Angie perfectly conveys the innocence, naivete, yearning, anxiety, and rapture of a young girl discovering love for the first time. She is equally adept at capturing Jack, with his deeper voice, humble honesty, and "aw-shucks" country twang. Whelan also ably responds to directions in the text, e.g., when Angie's sister is described as speaking in a falsely bright, overly casual voice, Whelan nails her tone exactly. This audio is as breezy, touching, and enjoyable as a summer romance. Ages 12-up. A Simon Pulse paperback. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

Often casually lumped with the formula teen romances it inspired, Maureen Daly's novel of more than sixty years ago was and remains a true original. The story of Angie's first love is richly textured by the evocation of its small-town Wisconsin setting; Angie's relationships with her parents and sisters also add depth. While references clearly reveal the book to be an artifact from another era, the writing is lyrical but spare, not florid but intensely romantic. From HORN BOOK Spring 2003, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

A small Wisconsin town is the background for a story that transcends its 1940s aura in its depiction of the angst and awe of a teenage girl's first love.


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