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Cover image for The hard way : a Jack Reacher novel
Format:
Title:
The hard way : a Jack Reacher novel
Author:
ISBN:
9780385336697

9780440241034

9780440246008

9780440423027
Publication Information:
New York : Delacorte Press, ©2006.
Physical Description:
371 pages ; 24 cm
Series title(s):
Number in series:
10.
Summary:
Jack Reacher comes to the aid of Edward Lane, the head of an illegal soldiers-for-hire operation, who enlists Reacher's assistance to find and stop a kidnapper who has abducted Lane's wife and child.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
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M CHILD
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MYS CHILD Jack Reacher #10
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CHILD
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MYSTERY - CHILD
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MYSTERY - CHILD
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M CHILD
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CHILD, L. Jack Reacher #10
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MYS CHILD
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CHILD, Lee
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On Order

Summary

Summary

In Lee Child's astonishing new thriller, ex--military cop Reacher sees more than most people would...and because of that, he's thrust into an explosive situation that's about to blow up in his face. For the only way to find the truth--and save two innocent lives--is to do it the way Jack Reacher does it best: the hard way….

Jack Reacher was alone, the way he liked it, soaking up the hot, electric New York City night, watching a man cross the street to a parked Mercedes and drive it away. The car contained one million dollars in ransom money. And Edward Lane, the man who paid it, will pay even more to get his family back. Lane runs a highly illegal soldiers-for-hire operation. He will use any amount of money and any tool to find his beautiful wife and child. And then he'll turn Jack Reacher loose with a vengeance--because Reacher is the best man hunter in the world.

On the trail of a vicious kidnapper, Reacher is learning the chilling secrets of his employer's past…and of a horrific drama in the heart of a nasty little war. He's beginning to realize that Edward Lane is hiding something. Something dirty. Something big. But Reacher also knows this: he's already in way too deep to stop now.


Author Notes

Lee Child is the pen name of Jim Grant, who was born in Coventry, England on October 29, 1954. He attended law school at Sheffield University, worked in the theater, and finally worked as a presentation director for Granada Television. After being laid off in 1995 because of corporate restructuring, he decided to write a book. The Killing Floor won the Anthony Award for Best First Novel and became the first book in the Jack Reacher series. In 2012, the first Jack Reacher film was released starring Tom Cruise. His book's, Worth Dying For and Past Tense, made the bestseller list in 2018.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

In bestseller Child's 10th novel to feature ex-army MP Jack Reacher (after 2005's One Shot), a sidewalk cafe encounter in New York City plunges Reacher into one of his most challenging-and thoroughly engrossing-adventures to date. Acting out of "reflex and professional curiosity" (and the promise of a generous fee), Reacher agrees to help sinister ex-army officer Edward Lane, whose posse of six Special Forces veterans are even more ominous than he, track down his kidnapped daughter and trophy wife. Since the kidnapping of wife number one five years earlier ended in her death, Lane cautions Reacher that he will not brook police interference ("You break your word, I'll put your eyes out"). From Lane's quarters in the West Side's venerable Dakota apartment building to the shady sections of SoHo and Greenwich Village, the author's atmospheric descriptions make Manhattan a leading player, with menace lurking at every intersection. The inevitable showdown, on a farm outside a tiny English village, ranks as one of Child's most thrilling finales. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Kirkus Review

In this slick, swift, sexy thriller, it's Jack Reacher, the thinking man's Rambo, against a band of hand-picked, combat-hardened, armed-to-the-teeth, ex-special services guys, but, hey, there are only eight of them. We're talking Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, Green Beret, British SAS and the like, all now free from their savage services but never from their training. Which is to render people dead without wasted motion or mercy. They're commanded by an ex-U.S. Army colonel who has formed these wacko killers into a group called Operational Security Consultants (read mercenaries), and who may be considerably off-kilter himself. Reacher comes into contact with them all by happenstance. Sitting in a favorite caf, sipping espresso, he notices something odd about a certain parked car--and is noticed noticing. What he's seen, it turns out, is a car full of ransom money. It belongs to ex-Colonel Edward Lane, whose wife and step-child--Kate and Jade--have been kidnapped. In Reacher's world, however, it's a truism that kidnappings are not always what they appear. Kate, Reacher soon learns, is not Lane's first wife. Nor is she his first wife to be kidnapped. Reacher learns this from a young woman with vengeance on her mind. For four years, Patti Joseph, the first Mrs. Lane's sister, has kept Lane under personal surveillance, convinced that he murdered her sister, intent on making him pay for it. From private eye Lauren Pauling--green-eyed and elegant--Reacher learns more about Lane, none of it redeeming. In and out of bed, Reacher and Pauling form an effective team, mounting a search-and-destroy operation that eventually takes them across the Atlantic to what amounts to an English O.K. Corral. Quintessential Child (One Shot, 2005, etc.)--preposterous as always, but oh, how those pages keep turning. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Child's last two Jack Reacher novels ( One Shot0 , 2005, and The Enemy0 , 2004) have emphasized procedural detail rather than the high-octane action that gave the series its identity. There's still plenty of procedure, but this time the gearshift is back in overdrive: "Reacher, alone in the dark. Armed and dangerous. Coming back." Former military cop Reacher does his level best not to come back: he lives off the grid (no address, no belongings), but his instincts keep driving him toward solving other people's problems, the kind that won't stay solved without violence. Here, he's having an espresso in Greenwich Village when a man walks across the street, gets in a car, and drives away. It happens every day, but it's not always a kidnapper picking up the ransom. Soon Reacher is involved in helping a ruthless mercenary find his wife and stepdaughter before the kidnappers tie up loose ends. There's a lot more to it than that, though, and it takes three-fourths of the novel before Reacher figures out who the bad guys are. Like all the best thrillers, this one is about more than pace: yes, the narrative propels you forward with a locomotive's thrust, but Child never loses sight of the small detail or the human fabric--not unlike Reacher in the dark, armed and dangerous, intent on the action in front of him but always aware of the sights and sounds to his sides and behind him. --Bill Ott Copyright 2006 Booklist


Library Journal Review

With it's sparse yet keenly observant prose, plenty of action, and underlying knowledge that wrongs will be righted and true justice served, The Hard Way clearly demonstrates why Child (The Enemy) is not only a best-selling author but one who clearly will have thinking listeners eager for his thrillers for years to come. Our flawed hero, ex-army military police major Jack Reacher, is called upon by the mysterious head of a private military corporation to use his bravery, intelligence, dogged investigative skills, and ruthless use of controlled violence to find a kidnapped woman and her daughter in New York City. The listener will be tempted to indulge in the whole work in one sitting after being taken on a roller coaster ride that ends with an unexpected conclusion. Dick Hill's narration is like the characters-real and multidimensional. Highly recommended.-Scott R. DiMarco, Mansfield Univ. of Pennsylvania (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.