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Cover image for Song and dance man
Format:
Title:
Song and dance man
ISBN:
9780394893303

9780394993300

9780679819950

9780758742261
Publication Information:
New York : Alfred A. Knopf, ©1988.
Distribution:
New York : Distributed by Random House, [1988]
Publication:
New York : Alfred A. Knopf, [1988]
Physical Description:
30 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm.
Series title(s):
General Note:
Art techniques used: Energizing pencil drawings in illuminating colors.
Summary:
Grandpa demonstrates for his visiting grandchildren some of the songs, dances, and jokes he performed when he was a vaudeville entertainer.
Reading Level:
780 Lexile.

Decoding indicator: 60 (middle) Semantic indicator: 70 (high) Syntactic indicator: 100 (high) Structure indicator: 90 (high) Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader LG 4.0 0.5.
Added Author:
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
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J PICTURE BOOK - ACKERMAN
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E ACKERMAN
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ACKERMAN 1989
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ACKERMAN
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J Ackerman
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JP ACKERMAN
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E ACKERMAN
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E ACK
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On Order

Summary

Summary

A beautifully nostalgic picture book about one grandfather's younger days that shows you're only as old as you feel!

"In this affectionate story, three children follow their grandfather up to the attic, where he pulls out his old bowler hat, gold-tipped cane, and his tap shoes. Grandpa once danced on the vaudeville stage, and as he glides across the floor, the children can see what it was like to be a song and dance man. Gammell captures all the story's inherent joie de vivre with color pencil renderings that leap off the pages. Bespectacled, enthusiastic Grandpa clearly exudes the message that you're only as old as you feel, but the children respond--as will readers--to the nostalgia of the moment. Utterly original."--(starred) Booklist.


Author Notes

Karen Ackerman has written over 25 books for young readers, including T he Night Crossing, A Brighter Garden illustrated by Tasha Tudor , and Bingleman's Midway illustrated by Barry Moser.

In addition to winning the Caldecott Award for his spirited illustrations in Song and Dance Man , Stephen Gammell is the illustrator of two Caldecott Honor Books, The Relatives Came by Cynthia Rylant and Where the Buffaloes Begin by Olaf Baker.


Reviews 5

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2 Gammell's animated, crisp, colored pencil line drawings enhance this story of Grandpa, who was famous for his vaudeville song and dance. Clever details of his and his grandchildrens' personalities are consciously delineated as he now performs on his attic stage. The shadow and the performer, transformed by his art, complement the text tenderly. The spirit of song and dance are reflected in the careful placement of drawings and text; five times they stretch voluminously across double-page spreads, although the text is always legible. It is also poetic at times. The accurate depiction of old age and the magic of the theater rhythmically combine like a dance with a solid beginning, middle, and end. It offers enchantment for children and for the person of any age who reads it to them. In its entirety, this glimpse into a unique, artistic personality offers a sweet reminder of the joy in the diversity of people, much like Blos' memorable Old Henry (Morrow, 1987). In boldness, realism, and linear strength, the illustrations are reminiscent of Steig's Amos and Boris (Farrar, 1971), which is also about individuality and acceptance. However, the persistence of memory and the acceptance of individuality are sophisticated concepts. The book's only weakness is that it may too often be set aside by adults looking for something easier to digest. Gratia Banta, Germantown Public Library, Dayton, Ohio (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Grandpa, once a song-and-dance man on the vaudeville stage, is invigorated by a visit from three grandchildren. They climb the stairs to the attic where mementoes of the past glitter invitingly through the dust. The reminders of days gone by beckon to Grandpa; he wants to show his grandchildren what made a song-and-dance man great. Throwing open an old trunk, he arranges a stage while the children try on hats and attempt a few steps of their own. At last the mesmerizing show begins: Grandpa plays the banjo and performs tricks; he tells the oldest of jokes and laughs until his eyes water. This tender story is charmingly told; Gammell's illustrations, particularly his portrayal of Grandpa, sparkle with personality. By working ingeniously in shadows and silhouettes that hint at a younger and more vibrant Grandpa and by using small explosions of color, the artist further enhances the blending of past and present. Ages 3-7. (Oct . ) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Horn Book Review

A former vaudeville performer, Grandpa can still set his feet to tapping, recall the favorite old songs, and chortle over ancient jokes before his three delighted grandchildren. Ackerman's quiet text is brought to warm and affectionate life by Gammell's superb artistry in this Caldecott medal winner and welcome reissue. From HORN BOOK Fall 2003, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Lucky kids--Grandpa used to be in vaudeville, and when he takes them to his attic, gets old costumes and tap shoes out of his trunk, and not only sings and dances but tells jokes and does magic tricks, ""the show is better than any show on TV."" Dumpy old Grandpa is comfortable in his modest retirement, but he can still enthrall his loving audience of three, bringing the past to life with a little improvisation and a lot of spirit. Though he's soon out of breath, ""his voice is as round and strong as a canyon echo""; and when he starts to tap-dance, the sounds ""are too many to make with only two feet."" Gammell's colors illuminate the uncommon joy of these homely folks and capture the ghostly images of Grandpa's memories as well as the ebullience he conveys to the children. A warm portrait of a grand old man at peace with his past. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. In this affectionate story, three children follow their grandfather up to the attic, where he pulls out his old bowler hat, gold- tipped cane, and, most importantly, his tap shoes. Grandpa once danced on the vaudeville stage, and as he glides across the floor, the children can see what it was like to be a song and dance man. As the enthralled children watch, Grandpa sings, pulls a silver dollar out of one child's hair, and tells jokes. For a grand finale, he performs a tap dance that has him leaping in the air, the children's applause ringing in his ears. Gammell captures all the story's inherent joie de vivre with color pencil renderings that fairly leap off the pages. Bespectacled, enthusiastic Grandpa clearly exudes the message that you're only as old as you feel, but the children respond-- as will readers-- to the nostalgia of the moment. Grandpa says he wouldn't trade a million good old days for those he spends with his grandchildren, but the way he glances up the attic stairs gives a hint of the depth of his feelings. Utterly original. IC.