Learn more about CCRLS
Reading recommendations from Novelist
Online learning resources
Cover image for Interrupting chicken
Format:
Title:
Interrupting chicken
ISBN:
9780763641689

9780763689032

9781406340310

9780545391474
Publication Information:
Cambridge, Mass. : Candlewick Press, 2010.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations
Summary:
Little Red Chicken wants Papa to read her a bedtime story, but interrupts him almost as soon as he begins each tale.
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Status
Searching...
+ PRESCHOOL - STEIN
Searching...
Searching...
Stein
Searching...
Searching...
STEIN
Searching...
Searching...
E STEIN
Searching...
Searching...
STEIN
Searching...
Searching...
STEIN
Searching...
Searching...
JP Ste
Searching...
Searching...
J White (Stein)
Searching...
Searching...
JP STEIN
Searching...
Searching...
E STEIN
Searching...
Searching...
JP Ste
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Awarded a 2011 Caldecott Honor! A favorite joke inspires this charming tale, in which a little chicken's habit of interrupting bedtime stories is gleefully turned on its head.

It's time for the little red chicken's bedtime story--and a reminder from Papa to try not to interrupt. But the chicken can't help herself! Whether the tale is Hansel and Gretel or Little Red Riding Hood or even Chicken Little , she jumps into the story to save its hapless characters from doing some dangerous or silly thing. Now it's the little red chicken's turn to tell a story, but will her yawning papa make it to the end without his own kind of interrupting? Energetically illustrated with glowing colors--and offering humorous story-within-a-story views--this all-too-familiar tale is sure to amuse (and hold the attention of ) spirited little chicks.


Author Notes

David Ezra Stein is an author-illustrator whose previous books include Leaves, winner of an Ezra Jack Keats New Writer Award. He lives in Kew Gardens, New York.


Reviews 5

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-It's bedtime for little red chicken, but she is more interested in saving the characters in the fairy tales that Papa is reading than in relaxing and going to sleep in this picture book (Candlewick, 2010) by David Ezra Stein. As Papa reads, Little Chicken can't help interrupting the stories to warn Hansel and Gretel and Little Red Riding Hood of impending dangers, and to reassure Chicken Little that a falling acorn is not the end of the world. Thus, she ends each story prematurely, until Papa runs out of tales, and suggests that Little Chicken tell him a story. Ironically, her story succeeds in putting Papa to sleep, and ends this tale. Andrew Watts does a good job of differentiating between Papa's mellow voice, Little Chicken's lighter interjections, and the screechy witch's and the gruff wolf's voices. Page-turn signals are optional. Stein's humorous, vivid illustrations contrast the classic tales with the ongoing story-so be sure to have the book available. Youngsters will want to hear this story again and again.-MaryAnn Karre, Horace Mann Elementary School, Binghamton, NY (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Stein's earlier books did not foretell an ability to pull off broad comedy, but this father-and-daughter bedtime banter is all the better for being a surprise. A little red chicken, lying in bed in her pajamas, can't help slamming on the brakes when Papa's read-aloud stories get too tense: "Out jumped a little red chicken," she cuts in as Papa reads Hansel and Gretel, "and she said, ¿DON'T GO IN! SHE'S A WITCH!' So Hansel and Gretel didn't. THE END!" Stein's spreads are thickly and energetically worked, the colors intense, and the lighting and shadows dramatic. For Papa's bedtime stories, Stein (Leaves) shifts styles, inking each scene in spindly ink; when the chicken interrupts, she bursts onto the sepia pages in full color. And when, after cutting short three of Papa's stories, she starts in on a tale of her own, Stein switches again to preschooler crayon, as her sleepy father interrupts in his own way. The delivery is Catskill perfect; readers will fall hard for the antics of this hapless pair. Ages 4-8. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Horn Book Review

A "little red chicken" keeps interrupting Papa's bedtime stories in order to save the day (e.g., telling Chicken Little, "It was just an acorn!"). With a reversal of roles, the little chicken discovers exactly how it feels to be interrupted. Humorously repetitive text draws readers in with just enough variation, while the lush mixed-media illustrations exude warmth and love. (c) Copyright 2011. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

(Picture book. 4-6)]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

At bedtime, Papa prepares to read an old favorite to the little red chicken, but before beginning, he reminds her not to interrupt the story. Reassured, he begins Hansel and Gretel, but just as the two children approach the witch's house, up pops the little red chicken, exclaiming DON'T GO IN! SHE'S A WITCH!' . . . THE END! Two more attempted bedtime stories end abruptly with the little red chicken saving Little Red Riding Hood and Chicken Little. The childlike humor of this wonderfully illustrated picture book will bring belly laughs from kids, particularly those who know the original stories. Stein uses page turns dramatically to build tension, which is released each time the chicken interrupts and amends a fairy tale. Differences in medium and style differentiate between scenes taking place in the folktales and in the main story. Created with watercolor, water-soluble crayon, and pen and ink, the illustrations are vivid and dramatic. Great fun for reading aloud.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2010 Booklist